John Skelton doesnt really see it that way I d

first_imgJohn Skelton doesn’t really see it that way.“I don’t think you can say that this is a ‘bigger’ game; I don’t think anyone’s pressing or anything to that effect,” he said after practice in Flagstaff Tuesday. “It is an important game in the fact that we haven’t done well in the last two and we need to kind of show something here.”So there you go, it is a big game, just not how you may have thought.Skelton is absolutely correct when he says the offense as a whole must show something more than it did the previous games. Moving the ball has been a struggle with both Skelton and Kolb under center, and everyone would feel better if the team scored some points early against the Raiders.“It goes without saying,” Skelton said. “Everyone knows we need to start fast. No one’s content with the way we’ve been playing.”Skelton, though, said no one is panicking and that the offense is not far from being where it needs to be. Adding that he feels the issues are being “amplified” by people outside of the organization, the QB is confident “we will be fine.”Time will tell, and the Cardinals still have three preseason games left to right the ship — including Friday’s which, remember, Skelton said isn’t that big of a deal as it pertains to the QB battle. Nevada officials reach out to D-backs on potential relocation What an MLB source said about the D-backs’ trade haul for Greinke “One game is not going to make or break someone,” he said. “I think this game, I don’t think Kevin and I are approaching it any differently from the competition standpoint.”Arizona Sports’ Kyndra de St. Aubin contributed to this report – / 24 Comments   Share   Cardinals expect improving Murphy to contribute right away Top Stories The belief that Friday’s preseason game against the Raiders will be the turning point — if not the tipping point — in the Cardinals QB competition is starting to gain some steam.From the Adam Schefter report that John Skelton is the current favorite to CBS Sports’ Jason LaCanfora saying Kevin Kolb will be given every opportunity to win the job, it could be that plenty will be on the line at University of Phoenix Stadium. D-backs president Derrick Hall: Franchise ‘still focused on Arizona’last_img read more

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first_imgJohn Skelton doesn’t really see it that way.“I don’t think you can say that this is a ‘bigger’ game; I don’t think anyone’s pressing or anything to that effect,” he said after practice in Flagstaff Tuesday. “It is an important game in the fact that we haven’t done well in the last two and we need to kind of show something here.”So there you go, it is a big game, just not how you may have thought.Skelton is absolutely correct when he says the offense as a whole must show something more than it did the previous games. Moving the ball has been a struggle with both Skelton and Kolb under center, and everyone would feel better if the team scored some points early against the Raiders.“It goes without saying,” Skelton said. “Everyone knows we need to start fast. No one’s content with the way we’ve been playing.”Skelton, though, said no one is panicking and that the offense is not far from being where it needs to be. Adding that he feels the issues are being “amplified” by people outside of the organization, the QB is confident “we will be fine.”Time will tell, and the Cardinals still have three preseason games left to right the ship — including Friday’s which, remember, Skelton said isn’t that big of a deal as it pertains to the QB battle. Nevada officials reach out to D-backs on potential relocation What an MLB source said about the D-backs’ trade haul for Greinke “One game is not going to make or break someone,” he said. “I think this game, I don’t think Kevin and I are approaching it any differently from the competition standpoint.”Arizona Sports’ Kyndra de St. Aubin contributed to this report – / 24 Comments   Share   Cardinals expect improving Murphy to contribute right away Top Stories The belief that Friday’s preseason game against the Raiders will be the turning point — if not the tipping point — in the Cardinals QB competition is starting to gain some steam.From the Adam Schefter report that John Skelton is the current favorite to CBS Sports’ Jason LaCanfora saying Kevin Kolb will be given every opportunity to win the job, it could be that plenty will be on the line at University of Phoenix Stadium. D-backs president Derrick Hall: Franchise ‘still focused on Arizona’last_img read more

Elephant poaching falls dramatically in Africa

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Colin Beale Email Elephants at Tarangire National Park in Tanzania Elephant poaching in Africa has dropped significantly from a peak in 2011, according to a new analysis of annual surveillance data. The progress seems to have resulted in large part from declining demand for ivory in China, which has banned the trade, and government action in some African countries. But even with the “vast improvements,” the problem isn’t solved yet, says ecologist George Wittemyer of Colorado State University in Fort Collins, who was not involved in the study. “The pressure is still high, and the species is under threat.”The illegal killing of elephants in sub-Saharan Africa began to rise in 2005. Many scientists suspected the rise was due to growing demand for ivory in China, where carved ivory has long been treasured and a growing middle class was flush with cash. It developed into a “huge poaching problem,” says Colin Beale, an ecologist at the University of York in the United Kingdom. By 2014, the continental population of savanna elephants had dropped by almost a third to an estimated 352,000. To figure out which elephants were killed by poachers—and which died of natural causes—rangers working with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora examined carcasses found at 53 sites in parks across the continent. Their annual reports cover about half the African elephant population.Beale and colleagues took these raw data from 2002 to 2017 and, after adjusting for various biases, found that illegal killing peaked in 2011, when 10% of all elephants fell victim to poaching. That number has now fallen to about 4%, they report today in Nature Communications. Wittemyer calls the study “a pretty sophisticated analysis.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img To figure out the reason for the decline, Beale and his colleagues turned to the ivory trade, looking at its price as a proxy for demand. Because selling elephant ivory is illegal, price data aren’t publicly available; instead, the researchers analyzed the cost of ivory from an extinct relative, the mammoth, which is legal to trade. The poaching rate closely followed the ups and downs in those prices, they found. In the major Chinese markets, mammoth ivory—which sells for far less than elephant ivory—ranged from $22 per kilogram wholesale in 2002 to more than $90 in 2011.Many conservation groups credit the Chinese government’s 2017 ban on the ivory trade—and its 2016 announcement—for the decline in elephant poaching. Celebrity ads in which actor Jackie Chan and basketball star Yao Ming condemned the ivory business may have helped as well. But Beale isn’t convinced that cultural tastes have completely changed; he thinks the fall-off may be because of a slowdown in economic growth. If China’s economy catches fire again, demand for ivory might also increase, he worries. “It’s too early to be complacent,” he says.In addition to ivory prices, the researchers found three other factors that seemed to affect poaching rates. From most to least influential, they are: the amount of corruption in a country, the poverty rate in villages near elephant populations, and the adequacy of law enforcement, as reported by rangers in the wildlife parks. To Beale, those factors suggest fighting poverty may be a better way to protect elephants than shoring up law enforcement.But he cautions against any cuts to such enforcement. As Wittemyer notes, much of the progress in reducing poaching, especially in East Africa, was thanks to Tanzania and other East African countries improving protection. “That’s been the biggest shift we’ve seen on the continent,” Wittemyer says. “It’s a big improvement.”It’s not clear whether elephant populations can survive in the long run with the current, lower level of poaching. Beale and his Ph.D. student Severin Hauenstein are planning to study that question. Wittemyer suspects a significant threat persists. “We’re not out of the risk zone yet.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Elephant poaching falls dramatically in Africa By Erik StokstadMay. 28, 2019 , 11:00 AMlast_img read more

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first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Colin Beale Email Elephants at Tarangire National Park in Tanzania Elephant poaching in Africa has dropped significantly from a peak in 2011, according to a new analysis of annual surveillance data. The progress seems to have resulted in large part from declining demand for ivory in China, which has banned the trade, and government action in some African countries. But even with the “vast improvements,” the problem isn’t solved yet, says ecologist George Wittemyer of Colorado State University in Fort Collins, who was not involved in the study. “The pressure is still high, and the species is under threat.”The illegal killing of elephants in sub-Saharan Africa began to rise in 2005. Many scientists suspected the rise was due to growing demand for ivory in China, where carved ivory has long been treasured and a growing middle class was flush with cash. It developed into a “huge poaching problem,” says Colin Beale, an ecologist at the University of York in the United Kingdom. By 2014, the continental population of savanna elephants had dropped by almost a third to an estimated 352,000. To figure out which elephants were killed by poachers—and which died of natural causes—rangers working with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora examined carcasses found at 53 sites in parks across the continent. Their annual reports cover about half the African elephant population.Beale and colleagues took these raw data from 2002 to 2017 and, after adjusting for various biases, found that illegal killing peaked in 2011, when 10% of all elephants fell victim to poaching. That number has now fallen to about 4%, they report today in Nature Communications. Wittemyer calls the study “a pretty sophisticated analysis.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img To figure out the reason for the decline, Beale and his colleagues turned to the ivory trade, looking at its price as a proxy for demand. Because selling elephant ivory is illegal, price data aren’t publicly available; instead, the researchers analyzed the cost of ivory from an extinct relative, the mammoth, which is legal to trade. The poaching rate closely followed the ups and downs in those prices, they found. In the major Chinese markets, mammoth ivory—which sells for far less than elephant ivory—ranged from $22 per kilogram wholesale in 2002 to more than $90 in 2011.Many conservation groups credit the Chinese government’s 2017 ban on the ivory trade—and its 2016 announcement—for the decline in elephant poaching. Celebrity ads in which actor Jackie Chan and basketball star Yao Ming condemned the ivory business may have helped as well. But Beale isn’t convinced that cultural tastes have completely changed; he thinks the fall-off may be because of a slowdown in economic growth. If China’s economy catches fire again, demand for ivory might also increase, he worries. “It’s too early to be complacent,” he says.In addition to ivory prices, the researchers found three other factors that seemed to affect poaching rates. From most to least influential, they are: the amount of corruption in a country, the poverty rate in villages near elephant populations, and the adequacy of law enforcement, as reported by rangers in the wildlife parks. To Beale, those factors suggest fighting poverty may be a better way to protect elephants than shoring up law enforcement.But he cautions against any cuts to such enforcement. As Wittemyer notes, much of the progress in reducing poaching, especially in East Africa, was thanks to Tanzania and other East African countries improving protection. “That’s been the biggest shift we’ve seen on the continent,” Wittemyer says. “It’s a big improvement.”It’s not clear whether elephant populations can survive in the long run with the current, lower level of poaching. Beale and his Ph.D. student Severin Hauenstein are planning to study that question. Wittemyer suspects a significant threat persists. “We’re not out of the risk zone yet.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Elephant poaching falls dramatically in Africa By Erik StokstadMay. 28, 2019 , 11:00 AMlast_img read more