Not Even Sam Hinkie Could Outsmart The NBA Draft

Hot Takedown Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (April 12, 2016), we explore the pain of Jordan Spieth’s collapse in the final round of the 2016 Masters with Golf Digest’s Shane Ryan, we argue about Sam Hinkie’s legacy with the Philadelphia 76ers and ask whether his resignation is a referendum on tanking in the NBA, and we preview the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Plus, a significant digit on the Detroit Tigers fan who caught five foul balls at a home game against the Pittsburgh Pirates.Stream the episode by clicking the play button, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to above. Links to what we discuss are here:ESPN’s Ian O’Connor says Jordan Spieth’s collapse was the most shocking in golf’s history.Neil Paine explains why Spieth’s choke also required a great comeback from Englishman Danny Willett.Here is Sam Hinkie’s 13-page letter to the Philadelphia 76ers’ investors.And here’s Albert Burneko of Deadspin telling us why Hinkie’s words are self-congratulatory and borderline incoherent.On the other side, 76ers’ blogger Andrew Unterberger says Hinkie gave Philly hope.The Washington Post’s Fancy Stats blog outlines the fatal flaws of this year’s NHL playoff teams.And Kevin Allen in USA Today says there are no favorites on the way to the Stanley Cup.Significant Digit: about 1 in 262 trillion. That’s the estimated likelihood of catching five foul balls at the home of the Detroit Tigers, Comerica Park — a feat achieved by Tigers’ fan Bill Dugan at a game on Monday. Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

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Hot Takedown Welcome to the latest episode of Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast. On this week’s show (April 12, 2016), we explore the pain of Jordan Spieth’s collapse in the final round of the 2016 Masters with Golf Digest’s Shane Ryan, we argue about Sam Hinkie’s legacy with the Philadelphia 76ers and ask whether his resignation is a referendum on tanking in the NBA, and we preview the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Plus, a significant digit on the Detroit Tigers fan who caught five foul balls at a home game against the Pittsburgh Pirates.Stream the episode by clicking the play button, or subscribe using one of the podcast clients we’ve linked to above. Links to what we discuss are here:ESPN’s Ian O’Connor says Jordan Spieth’s collapse was the most shocking in golf’s history.Neil Paine explains why Spieth’s choke also required a great comeback from Englishman Danny Willett.Here is Sam Hinkie’s 13-page letter to the Philadelphia 76ers’ investors.And here’s Albert Burneko of Deadspin telling us why Hinkie’s words are self-congratulatory and borderline incoherent.On the other side, 76ers’ blogger Andrew Unterberger says Hinkie gave Philly hope.The Washington Post’s Fancy Stats blog outlines the fatal flaws of this year’s NHL playoff teams.And Kevin Allen in USA Today says there are no favorites on the way to the Stanley Cup.Significant Digit: about 1 in 262 trillion. That’s the estimated likelihood of catching five foul balls at the home of the Detroit Tigers, Comerica Park — a feat achieved by Tigers’ fan Bill Dugan at a game on Monday. Embed Code More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed If you’re a fan of our podcasts, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts and leave a rating/review. That helps spread the word to other listeners. And get in touch by email, on Twitter or in the comments. Tell us what you think, send us hot takes to discuss and tell us why we’re wrong. read more

Are The Giants Sneaking Up On Us Again

It’s easy to dismiss the success of the 7-3 New York Giants. The team ranks 23rd in scoring, tied with the 49ers, and is 11th in points allowed; overall, the Giants have outscored opponents by only 4 points all year. In fact, the Giants haven’t won a single game by more than 7 points. Meanwhile, they rank 20th in yards per game and 16th in yards allowed per game and have benefited from a favorable schedule: The team has played only three true road games this year.1The Giants have played six games at home; they also played one game in London, against the Rams.Ahead of Week 11’s games, the Giants ranked 16th in both ESPN’s NFL Power Rankings and Football Outsiders’ Defense-adjusted Value Over Average, and their 6-point home win against a bad Bears team is unlikely to move those needles. And even after Sunday’s win, the Giants rank only 17th in FiveThirtyEight’s NFL Elo ratings.So the Giants are just an average team that has lucked into a good record, right? That’s an easy conclusion, but the Giants have a history of sneaking up on the rest of the NFL, as they did in 2007 and 2011:In 2007, New York was 7-3 through 10 games but imploded in the team’s 11th game. Against Minnesota, Eli Manning threw three pick sixes (he would finish the year with 20 picks, tied for the league lead).In 2011, the Giants through 10 games had scored 228 points and allowed 228 points, leading to a 6-4 record.At the time, neither of those teams seemed very noteworthy, and they finished with 10-6 and 9-7 records, respectively. Our current simulations have this year’s Giants finishing with 9.9 wins, which would put them right in line with those other good but not great Giants teams.Of course, both of those Giants teams wound up winning the Super Bowl. Is there any reason to think this year’s team could similarly surprise in the playoffs? To find out, let’s use expected points added to measure how the Giants have fared in every season (through 10 games) going back to 2006.2The first year for which we have EPA data. And while EPA does not adjust for era, we have adjusted those numbers on a per-play basis to account for those differences. I took an average of the per-play EPA for passing and rushing plays from 2006 to 2016 and then adjusted each season of team EPA data based on how the per-play average in a given season differed from the per-play average overall.Pass offense The 2007 and 2011 Giants were both strong against the run, but this year’s squad is even stronger. The Giants currently rank eighth in rushing yards allowed per game and fifth in yards per carry allowed. The additions of Harrison and Vernon have transformed the defensive line, after the defense ranked in the bottom half of the league in most rushing categories last year.ConclusionThe defense is the clear strength of this year’s Giants team, and it’s in a better position through 10 games than the defenses were during those Super Bowl-winning seasons. That’s a good thing, because unlike in those championship seasons, Eli Manning and the Giants offense are playing at or below league average — not exactly in position to carry a team on a late-season winning streak. So if the Giants make a run for the Super Bowl, it may be less likely to resemble Eli Manning’s two Super Bowl teams and more likely to resemble Eli’s brother’s team last year.Check out our latest NFL predictions. In 2007, the Giants’ offense was centered around Brandon Jacobs and Derrick Ward, with spot appearances by Reuben Droughns and rookie Ahmad Bradshaw. The ground game ranked fourth in yards and yards per carry.But even though the Earth, Wind and Fire Giants carried over their rushing success into 2008, the running game has been more of a weakness than a strength in more recent years. In 2011, the Giants finished dead last in both yards and yards per carry. And once again, the Giants can’t seem to piece together a running game. This season, New York ranks 31st in yards and 30th in yards per carry, with the underwhelming Rashad Jennings the leader in an unimpressive committee. The veteran back is averaging an anemic 3.40 yards per carry, 38th out of 43 qualifying rushers.With this year’s Giants featuring a mediocre passing game and a bad running game, you’ve probably figured out that it’s not the offense carrying the team.Pass defense In 2007, the Giants’ passing attack through 10 games wasn’t very good (and it would only get worse: The team finished the regular season at 22nd in adjusted net yards per attempt and 24th in passer rating). The running game (more on this in a minute) is what powered the team. But Eli Manning had some of his best games in the playoffs, particularly in the first two games.In 2011, the Giants were defined by the passing offense: Manning had one of his best seasons, teaming with wide receivers Victor Cruz and Hakeem Nicks. Manning again played better in the postseason, particularly in the early rounds.This year? Despite highlights from Manning and Odell Beckham Jr. and the success of rookie Sterling Shepard, the Giants have had a mediocre passing attack. They rank 19th in passing EPA and 16th in ANY/A. There’s obvious upside with Manning and Beckham, but if the Giants go on a Super Bowl run, the data suggests that the passing offense won’t be behind it.Rushing offense The most enduring image of the 2007 Giants is likely the beating that the team gave Tom Brady and the undefeated New England Patriots, but it’s easy to forget that through 10 games, that team was below average against the pass. Same goes for the 2011 version, which was among the worst teams in the league at defending the pass until it got its act together down the stretch.Last year, the pass defense was the Giants’ downfall — the team ranked 28th in EPA and 29th in ANY/A allowed, factors that led to the team finishing 30th in points allowed and last in yards allowed. The Giants finished 6-10, with opposing quarterbacks leading five fourth-quarter comebacks against them and a sixth loss involving another blown lead in the final minute.In the offseason, the Giants spent a ton of money to improve the defense. The team re-signed Jason Pierre-Paul; added Olivier Vernon, Janoris Jenkins and Damon Harrison; and drafted cornerback Eli Apple in the first round. Those additions have paid dividends, and safety Landon Collins, selected 33rd overall last year, has been a huge part of the team’s turnaround. This year, the Giants rank eighth in pass EPA and fifth in ANY/A allowed, and the pass defense is the strength of the team in a way it hasn’t been in years.Rush defense read more

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It’s easy to dismiss the success of the 7-3 New York Giants. The team ranks 23rd in scoring, tied with the 49ers, and is 11th in points allowed; overall, the Giants have outscored opponents by only 4 points all year. In fact, the Giants haven’t won a single game by more than 7 points. Meanwhile, they rank 20th in yards per game and 16th in yards allowed per game and have benefited from a favorable schedule: The team has played only three true road games this year.1The Giants have played six games at home; they also played one game in London, against the Rams.Ahead of Week 11’s games, the Giants ranked 16th in both ESPN’s NFL Power Rankings and Football Outsiders’ Defense-adjusted Value Over Average, and their 6-point home win against a bad Bears team is unlikely to move those needles. And even after Sunday’s win, the Giants rank only 17th in FiveThirtyEight’s NFL Elo ratings.So the Giants are just an average team that has lucked into a good record, right? That’s an easy conclusion, but the Giants have a history of sneaking up on the rest of the NFL, as they did in 2007 and 2011:In 2007, New York was 7-3 through 10 games but imploded in the team’s 11th game. Against Minnesota, Eli Manning threw three pick sixes (he would finish the year with 20 picks, tied for the league lead).In 2011, the Giants through 10 games had scored 228 points and allowed 228 points, leading to a 6-4 record.At the time, neither of those teams seemed very noteworthy, and they finished with 10-6 and 9-7 records, respectively. Our current simulations have this year’s Giants finishing with 9.9 wins, which would put them right in line with those other good but not great Giants teams.Of course, both of those Giants teams wound up winning the Super Bowl. Is there any reason to think this year’s team could similarly surprise in the playoffs? To find out, let’s use expected points added to measure how the Giants have fared in every season (through 10 games) going back to 2006.2The first year for which we have EPA data. And while EPA does not adjust for era, we have adjusted those numbers on a per-play basis to account for those differences. I took an average of the per-play EPA for passing and rushing plays from 2006 to 2016 and then adjusted each season of team EPA data based on how the per-play average in a given season differed from the per-play average overall.Pass offense The 2007 and 2011 Giants were both strong against the run, but this year’s squad is even stronger. The Giants currently rank eighth in rushing yards allowed per game and fifth in yards per carry allowed. The additions of Harrison and Vernon have transformed the defensive line, after the defense ranked in the bottom half of the league in most rushing categories last year.ConclusionThe defense is the clear strength of this year’s Giants team, and it’s in a better position through 10 games than the defenses were during those Super Bowl-winning seasons. That’s a good thing, because unlike in those championship seasons, Eli Manning and the Giants offense are playing at or below league average — not exactly in position to carry a team on a late-season winning streak. So if the Giants make a run for the Super Bowl, it may be less likely to resemble Eli Manning’s two Super Bowl teams and more likely to resemble Eli’s brother’s team last year.Check out our latest NFL predictions. In 2007, the Giants’ offense was centered around Brandon Jacobs and Derrick Ward, with spot appearances by Reuben Droughns and rookie Ahmad Bradshaw. The ground game ranked fourth in yards and yards per carry.But even though the Earth, Wind and Fire Giants carried over their rushing success into 2008, the running game has been more of a weakness than a strength in more recent years. In 2011, the Giants finished dead last in both yards and yards per carry. And once again, the Giants can’t seem to piece together a running game. This season, New York ranks 31st in yards and 30th in yards per carry, with the underwhelming Rashad Jennings the leader in an unimpressive committee. The veteran back is averaging an anemic 3.40 yards per carry, 38th out of 43 qualifying rushers.With this year’s Giants featuring a mediocre passing game and a bad running game, you’ve probably figured out that it’s not the offense carrying the team.Pass defense In 2007, the Giants’ passing attack through 10 games wasn’t very good (and it would only get worse: The team finished the regular season at 22nd in adjusted net yards per attempt and 24th in passer rating). The running game (more on this in a minute) is what powered the team. But Eli Manning had some of his best games in the playoffs, particularly in the first two games.In 2011, the Giants were defined by the passing offense: Manning had one of his best seasons, teaming with wide receivers Victor Cruz and Hakeem Nicks. Manning again played better in the postseason, particularly in the early rounds.This year? Despite highlights from Manning and Odell Beckham Jr. and the success of rookie Sterling Shepard, the Giants have had a mediocre passing attack. They rank 19th in passing EPA and 16th in ANY/A. There’s obvious upside with Manning and Beckham, but if the Giants go on a Super Bowl run, the data suggests that the passing offense won’t be behind it.Rushing offense The most enduring image of the 2007 Giants is likely the beating that the team gave Tom Brady and the undefeated New England Patriots, but it’s easy to forget that through 10 games, that team was below average against the pass. Same goes for the 2011 version, which was among the worst teams in the league at defending the pass until it got its act together down the stretch.Last year, the pass defense was the Giants’ downfall — the team ranked 28th in EPA and 29th in ANY/A allowed, factors that led to the team finishing 30th in points allowed and last in yards allowed. The Giants finished 6-10, with opposing quarterbacks leading five fourth-quarter comebacks against them and a sixth loss involving another blown lead in the final minute.In the offseason, the Giants spent a ton of money to improve the defense. The team re-signed Jason Pierre-Paul; added Olivier Vernon, Janoris Jenkins and Damon Harrison; and drafted cornerback Eli Apple in the first round. Those additions have paid dividends, and safety Landon Collins, selected 33rd overall last year, has been a huge part of the team’s turnaround. This year, the Giants rank eighth in pass EPA and fifth in ANY/A allowed, and the pass defense is the strength of the team in a way it hasn’t been in years.Rush defense read more

Another big game another big struggle

Ohio State fans thought they could rest easy: The Buckeyes’ big game woes seemed to be over with wins against Oregon in January’s Rose Bowl and Miami (Fla.) at home in September. But alas, Tressel and his boys could not overcome the Camp Randall hoopla and OSU lost Saturday’s game, and its short-lived No. 1 spot, 31-18 against No. 18 Wisconsin. Quarterback Terrelle Pryor looked like he was unable to complete a meaningful pass. The defense allowed Wisconsin to run the ball at will. Special teams gave up a 97-yard touchdown on the opening kickoff. To put it simply, the Buckeyes’ preparation just didn’t pan out. “We’ve got to stop taking stuff for granted,” Pryor said, unwilling to look anyone in the eye after the game. “I wanted to make sure that we stayed focused … and those things I talked about, it happened today.” There were many x-factors reminiscent of recent big-game losses for the Buckeyes, one of which is the 50-percent completion rate for Pryor, who was 14 for 28. In the 2009 Fiesta Bowl, Pryor went 5 for 13 passes, after splitting snaps with then-senior and former starter Todd Boeckman. The then-No. 3 Texas Longhorns beat then-No. 10 OSU 24-21. As a Heisman hopeful and junior leader of the Buckeye squad, Pryor said he felt the weight of the loss on his shoulders after stating he had fully recovered from an injury he suffered during the Illinois game. “I can’t use the quad as an excuse, I had enough that I could run a little bit,” Pryor said. “That’s no excuse at all, I mean, the quad is fine.” It was the Buckeye defense that couldn’t come back from star safety Tyler Moeller’s injury against Illinois, as it gave up 104 yards to Wisconsin running back John Clay. The last time the Buckeyes allowed an opponent more than 100 rushing yards was in another No. 1 matchup on Sept. 13, 2008, when then-No. 5 OSU visited No. 1, Southern California and Joe McKnight racked up 105 yards. In Saturday’s game, the Buckeyes made a run with 18 unanswered points, beginning in the second quarter. But the attempt turned out to be in vain when the Badgers added a touchdown and a field goal in the last seven minutes of the game. “It’s hard to have momentum in somebody else’s house but we had a little bit of momentum,” said coach Jim Tressel about the beginning of the second half. “But, you know, (Wisconsin) delivered.” The loss in momentum, however, that allowed Wisconsin to score the final points was not unlike the loss in momentum with minutes left against USC on Sept. 12, 2009. USC started with the ball on its own 5-yard line and managed to march down the field for a touchdown and 2-point conversion to make the final score 18-15 USC. Running back Brandon Saine, who didn’t see much action until late in the game, said there hadn’t been a mental block for him or his teammates. “I think people were thinking the right things, but you know, coming into the stadium and trying to pull off a win is always hard,” Saine said. “This is one of the toughest places to play ever.” Despite their disappointment, Pryor said the Buckeyes have no reason to give up. “It was a team loss, but we’ll live to fight another day,” Pryor said. read more

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Ohio State fans thought they could rest easy: The Buckeyes’ big game woes seemed to be over with wins against Oregon in January’s Rose Bowl and Miami (Fla.) at home in September. But alas, Tressel and his boys could not overcome the Camp Randall hoopla and OSU lost Saturday’s game, and its short-lived No. 1 spot, 31-18 against No. 18 Wisconsin. Quarterback Terrelle Pryor looked like he was unable to complete a meaningful pass. The defense allowed Wisconsin to run the ball at will. Special teams gave up a 97-yard touchdown on the opening kickoff. To put it simply, the Buckeyes’ preparation just didn’t pan out. “We’ve got to stop taking stuff for granted,” Pryor said, unwilling to look anyone in the eye after the game. “I wanted to make sure that we stayed focused … and those things I talked about, it happened today.” There were many x-factors reminiscent of recent big-game losses for the Buckeyes, one of which is the 50-percent completion rate for Pryor, who was 14 for 28. In the 2009 Fiesta Bowl, Pryor went 5 for 13 passes, after splitting snaps with then-senior and former starter Todd Boeckman. The then-No. 3 Texas Longhorns beat then-No. 10 OSU 24-21. As a Heisman hopeful and junior leader of the Buckeye squad, Pryor said he felt the weight of the loss on his shoulders after stating he had fully recovered from an injury he suffered during the Illinois game. “I can’t use the quad as an excuse, I had enough that I could run a little bit,” Pryor said. “That’s no excuse at all, I mean, the quad is fine.” It was the Buckeye defense that couldn’t come back from star safety Tyler Moeller’s injury against Illinois, as it gave up 104 yards to Wisconsin running back John Clay. The last time the Buckeyes allowed an opponent more than 100 rushing yards was in another No. 1 matchup on Sept. 13, 2008, when then-No. 5 OSU visited No. 1, Southern California and Joe McKnight racked up 105 yards. In Saturday’s game, the Buckeyes made a run with 18 unanswered points, beginning in the second quarter. But the attempt turned out to be in vain when the Badgers added a touchdown and a field goal in the last seven minutes of the game. “It’s hard to have momentum in somebody else’s house but we had a little bit of momentum,” said coach Jim Tressel about the beginning of the second half. “But, you know, (Wisconsin) delivered.” The loss in momentum, however, that allowed Wisconsin to score the final points was not unlike the loss in momentum with minutes left against USC on Sept. 12, 2009. USC started with the ball on its own 5-yard line and managed to march down the field for a touchdown and 2-point conversion to make the final score 18-15 USC. Running back Brandon Saine, who didn’t see much action until late in the game, said there hadn’t been a mental block for him or his teammates. “I think people were thinking the right things, but you know, coming into the stadium and trying to pull off a win is always hard,” Saine said. “This is one of the toughest places to play ever.” Despite their disappointment, Pryor said the Buckeyes have no reason to give up. “It was a team loss, but we’ll live to fight another day,” Pryor said. read more

Ohio State defense ready for upsetminded Bison

OSU coach Thad Matta looks on during a game against Bryant Dec. 11 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 86-48. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorOhio State coach Thad Matta preaches team defense to his players every single day, a doctrine of success that has helped him lead the Buckeyes to 259 victories, a pair of Final Fours and four straight trips to the Sweet Sixteen.OSU’s defensive prowess has shown through even more this season, as the Buckeyes rank second in the country in scoring defense at 53.8 points per game, just a touch behind Clemson (53.6).“Coach Matta talks about it a lot, about every game, that we’re the best defense in the country,” junior guard Shannon Scott said Friday. “We really want to have that in our heads that nobody should be able to score on us. We want to make sure we’re the aggressor while we’re on offense and defense.”The Buckeyes (9-0, 0-0) have recorded 70 steals so far this season, with Scott and senior guard Aaron Craft swiping 21 and 23, respectively. The team also has 48 blocks through nine games, half of which are from junior center Amir Williams. Consistency on defense all over the floor is leading to the success, Scott said.“I feel like we’re all really connected right now,” Scott said.The Buckeyes are set to take on the North Dakota State Bison (7-3, 0-0) Saturday, who are fresh off of a 73-69 win at Notre Dame.“I think that was the best thing for us honestly,” Scott said, referring to the Bison’s win against the Irish. “We know they’re coming in as a great team, they just beat a great Notre Dame team. The fact that they’re coming in the way they are really puts us … backs us up on our toes where we can’t just go into the game expecting them to hand us the game because we’re Ohio State and they’re North Dakota State.”Bison senior forward Marshall Bjorklund scored 26 points against the Irish, and is one of four players who averages double figures in scoring.“(Bjorklund) shoots a very high percentage, so we have to try to get him outside the box, outside his comfort zone and not (let) him get the looks he’s been getting,” junior center Trey McDonald said Friday. “And also rely on some of the help from the guards with our pressure defense on the ball.”Matta said Bjorklund is “right there” in the discussion of best post player his team has faced all season, but has been pleased with what McDonald and Williams have done so far on defense, particularly in the team’s win against Bryant.“I’ve been very pleased, and I thought both guys Wednesday night had great awareness, great energy,” Matta said. “They made some plays out of their area, be it helping along the baseline or Amir blocking shots … That’s what we want those guys to do is to really plug the middle for us down there.”McDonald said he and Williams see playing against Bjorklund as an opportunity.“Although it is a team, it is team defense, we look at it as a personal challenge,” McDonald said. “Someone shooting that high of a field goal percentage and averaging that many points, we definitely look to Amir to try and shut them down and play our defensive game as we have been doing.”Shutting down Bjorklund and the rest of the Bison will be a challenge for the Buckeye defense, and even though there is always room to improve, Matta likes where they’re at currently.“I think that we’ve got some guys that are underrated defenders. I love what guys are bringing to the table,” Matta said. “Are we perfect? No, we’re not perfect. But we have guys dialed in and connected and tuned into scouting.”Tipoff between the Buckeyes and Bison is set for 8:15 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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OSU coach Thad Matta looks on during a game against Bryant Dec. 11 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 86-48. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorOhio State coach Thad Matta preaches team defense to his players every single day, a doctrine of success that has helped him lead the Buckeyes to 259 victories, a pair of Final Fours and four straight trips to the Sweet Sixteen.OSU’s defensive prowess has shown through even more this season, as the Buckeyes rank second in the country in scoring defense at 53.8 points per game, just a touch behind Clemson (53.6).“Coach Matta talks about it a lot, about every game, that we’re the best defense in the country,” junior guard Shannon Scott said Friday. “We really want to have that in our heads that nobody should be able to score on us. We want to make sure we’re the aggressor while we’re on offense and defense.”The Buckeyes (9-0, 0-0) have recorded 70 steals so far this season, with Scott and senior guard Aaron Craft swiping 21 and 23, respectively. The team also has 48 blocks through nine games, half of which are from junior center Amir Williams. Consistency on defense all over the floor is leading to the success, Scott said.“I feel like we’re all really connected right now,” Scott said.The Buckeyes are set to take on the North Dakota State Bison (7-3, 0-0) Saturday, who are fresh off of a 73-69 win at Notre Dame.“I think that was the best thing for us honestly,” Scott said, referring to the Bison’s win against the Irish. “We know they’re coming in as a great team, they just beat a great Notre Dame team. The fact that they’re coming in the way they are really puts us … backs us up on our toes where we can’t just go into the game expecting them to hand us the game because we’re Ohio State and they’re North Dakota State.”Bison senior forward Marshall Bjorklund scored 26 points against the Irish, and is one of four players who averages double figures in scoring.“(Bjorklund) shoots a very high percentage, so we have to try to get him outside the box, outside his comfort zone and not (let) him get the looks he’s been getting,” junior center Trey McDonald said Friday. “And also rely on some of the help from the guards with our pressure defense on the ball.”Matta said Bjorklund is “right there” in the discussion of best post player his team has faced all season, but has been pleased with what McDonald and Williams have done so far on defense, particularly in the team’s win against Bryant.“I’ve been very pleased, and I thought both guys Wednesday night had great awareness, great energy,” Matta said. “They made some plays out of their area, be it helping along the baseline or Amir blocking shots … That’s what we want those guys to do is to really plug the middle for us down there.”McDonald said he and Williams see playing against Bjorklund as an opportunity.“Although it is a team, it is team defense, we look at it as a personal challenge,” McDonald said. “Someone shooting that high of a field goal percentage and averaging that many points, we definitely look to Amir to try and shut them down and play our defensive game as we have been doing.”Shutting down Bjorklund and the rest of the Bison will be a challenge for the Buckeye defense, and even though there is always room to improve, Matta likes where they’re at currently.“I think that we’ve got some guys that are underrated defenders. I love what guys are bringing to the table,” Matta said. “Are we perfect? No, we’re not perfect. But we have guys dialed in and connected and tuned into scouting.”Tipoff between the Buckeyes and Bison is set for 8:15 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

Former Ohio State football player Bradley Roby pleads guilty to having physical

Then-redshirt-junior cornerback Bradley Roby (1) lines up in coverage during a game against Penn State Oct. 26 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 63-14.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorFormer Ohio State football player Bradley Roby pleaded guilty to having “physical control” of a vehicle while impaired, reduced from a charge of operating a vehicle under the influence, Tuesday.According to the Franklin County court report, Roby was fined $375 in addition to court fees.Roby was also sentenced to 180 days in jail, a sentence that was suspended on the condition that Roby participate in a three-day driver intervention program. He was given 30 days of probation as well.The former OSU cornerback was charged with OVI April 20.Roby’s agent Michael Perrett issued the following statement to The Lantern following Roby’s plea deal Tuesday.“Though my client, Bradley Roby, maintains his innocence and feels he would have been completely exonerated had he taken this matter to trial, Bradley has accepted the prosecutor’s offer of a reduced charge to ‘physical control’ to bring closure and finality to this situation ahead of next week’s NFL draft,” Perrett said in an email.“A ‘physical control’ citation is a non-moving violation that will not result in any points being added to his driving record and there will be no license suspension. Bradley is scheduled to complete a three-day alcohol educational class this week which will effectively terminate the case. This plea was accepted by the judge and entered into the record today … Bradley is very focused and is excited about starting his NFL career.”Roby, who was a three-year starter for the Buckeyes, voiced his frustration with the matter last week.“I was not driving . I did not get arrested . Was not in a cell . No finger prints . No mugshot,” Roby tweeted April 25 from his personal account, @BradRoby_1.Roby did not immediately respond an email requesting comment Tuesday.He was suspended the first game of the 2013 season after an incident at a bar in Bloomington, Ind., in July. The charges in that case were later dropped.Roby, who redshirted the 2010 season, recorded eight interceptions and 179 total tackles in his time at OSU and was named an All-American by ESPN in 2012. He is one of 30 NFL prospects scheduled to attend the NFL Draft in New York May 8. read more

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Then-redshirt-junior cornerback Bradley Roby (1) lines up in coverage during a game against Penn State Oct. 26 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 63-14.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorFormer Ohio State football player Bradley Roby pleaded guilty to having “physical control” of a vehicle while impaired, reduced from a charge of operating a vehicle under the influence, Tuesday.According to the Franklin County court report, Roby was fined $375 in addition to court fees.Roby was also sentenced to 180 days in jail, a sentence that was suspended on the condition that Roby participate in a three-day driver intervention program. He was given 30 days of probation as well.The former OSU cornerback was charged with OVI April 20.Roby’s agent Michael Perrett issued the following statement to The Lantern following Roby’s plea deal Tuesday.“Though my client, Bradley Roby, maintains his innocence and feels he would have been completely exonerated had he taken this matter to trial, Bradley has accepted the prosecutor’s offer of a reduced charge to ‘physical control’ to bring closure and finality to this situation ahead of next week’s NFL draft,” Perrett said in an email.“A ‘physical control’ citation is a non-moving violation that will not result in any points being added to his driving record and there will be no license suspension. Bradley is scheduled to complete a three-day alcohol educational class this week which will effectively terminate the case. This plea was accepted by the judge and entered into the record today … Bradley is very focused and is excited about starting his NFL career.”Roby, who was a three-year starter for the Buckeyes, voiced his frustration with the matter last week.“I was not driving . I did not get arrested . Was not in a cell . No finger prints . No mugshot,” Roby tweeted April 25 from his personal account, @BradRoby_1.Roby did not immediately respond an email requesting comment Tuesday.He was suspended the first game of the 2013 season after an incident at a bar in Bloomington, Ind., in July. The charges in that case were later dropped.Roby, who redshirted the 2010 season, recorded eight interceptions and 179 total tackles in his time at OSU and was named an All-American by ESPN in 2012. He is one of 30 NFL prospects scheduled to attend the NFL Draft in New York May 8. read more

After first loss OSU womens soccer looks to get back on track

OSU freshman midfielder Arden Holden (5) passes the ball during a game against Bucknell on Sept. 13 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won 2-0. Credit: Carlee Frank / For The LanternBig Ten conference play is set to begin in Columbus on Thursday evening as the No. 20 Ohio State women’s soccer team is scheduled to host the Minnesota Gophers at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. On Sunday afternoon, the Buckeyes are slated to take on the Wisconsin Badgers in game two of Big Ten play.The Buckeyes enter Thursday’s tilt at 5-1-1 on the season.OSU suffered its first loss of the season last weekend to West Virginia, but junior forward Nichelle Prince said she thinks the loss to the Mountaineers was a learning lesson for the team as it prepares to tackle the second half of its season.“I think it just made us realize that we still have a lot to work on,” Prince said. “We did have a good out-of-conference season but there is still a lot we need to do if we want to become Big Ten Champions and make it far into NCAAs.”Walker also said that, despite having just one loss, it is clear that the team has work to do.“There is a fine line in encouraging your players to be decision-makers and also getting them to play in symphony,” Walker said.The team’s strong start has come despite suffering a few injuries, but OSU coach Lori Walker said the Scarlet and Gray were prepared to handle those type of setbacks. “Any time a player gets injured it certainly changes your dynamic,” Walker said. “It’s one of those things we talk about in preseason, is that the starting line up at the beginning of the year, is never going to be the same at the end of the year. We try and get our players to think in those terms, and know they are always one ankle sprain away from having a role change. You just roll with it at this point in the season.”Walker said that with conference play now starting, the team will “reset” itself after seven hard-fought matches to start 2015.“Our record right now in the conference is 0-0-0, and so we’re perfect and that’s awesome,” she said. “We want to go into the conference play with that mentality of just getting after it with a clean slate.”Although the Buckeyes have a clean slate, Walker knows it might not stay that way for long due to the quality of teams in their conference. “There’s never an easy game in the Big Ten, and it becomes a real grind,” she said. “Just taking them one at a time as they come, and every team presents a different set of problems and we just have to be ready to play chess.”The Buckeyes are 4-1-0 at home and look to keep that success at home against the Gophers and Badgers.For that to continue, Walker said it will depend on the team’s attention to detail.“The little details add up to the big ones. Soccer is a thinking woman’s game and we want our players to be able to dissect what is the team doing, but while they’re doing that they can’t lose track of what the littlest details are,” she said.The Buckeyes and the Gophers are set to square off at 7:30 p.m., while the Badgers are scheduled to come to town for a noon match. read more

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OSU freshman midfielder Arden Holden (5) passes the ball during a game against Bucknell on Sept. 13 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won 2-0. Credit: Carlee Frank / For The LanternBig Ten conference play is set to begin in Columbus on Thursday evening as the No. 20 Ohio State women’s soccer team is scheduled to host the Minnesota Gophers at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. On Sunday afternoon, the Buckeyes are slated to take on the Wisconsin Badgers in game two of Big Ten play.The Buckeyes enter Thursday’s tilt at 5-1-1 on the season.OSU suffered its first loss of the season last weekend to West Virginia, but junior forward Nichelle Prince said she thinks the loss to the Mountaineers was a learning lesson for the team as it prepares to tackle the second half of its season.“I think it just made us realize that we still have a lot to work on,” Prince said. “We did have a good out-of-conference season but there is still a lot we need to do if we want to become Big Ten Champions and make it far into NCAAs.”Walker also said that, despite having just one loss, it is clear that the team has work to do.“There is a fine line in encouraging your players to be decision-makers and also getting them to play in symphony,” Walker said.The team’s strong start has come despite suffering a few injuries, but OSU coach Lori Walker said the Scarlet and Gray were prepared to handle those type of setbacks. “Any time a player gets injured it certainly changes your dynamic,” Walker said. “It’s one of those things we talk about in preseason, is that the starting line up at the beginning of the year, is never going to be the same at the end of the year. We try and get our players to think in those terms, and know they are always one ankle sprain away from having a role change. You just roll with it at this point in the season.”Walker said that with conference play now starting, the team will “reset” itself after seven hard-fought matches to start 2015.“Our record right now in the conference is 0-0-0, and so we’re perfect and that’s awesome,” she said. “We want to go into the conference play with that mentality of just getting after it with a clean slate.”Although the Buckeyes have a clean slate, Walker knows it might not stay that way for long due to the quality of teams in their conference. “There’s never an easy game in the Big Ten, and it becomes a real grind,” she said. “Just taking them one at a time as they come, and every team presents a different set of problems and we just have to be ready to play chess.”The Buckeyes are 4-1-0 at home and look to keep that success at home against the Gophers and Badgers.For that to continue, Walker said it will depend on the team’s attention to detail.“The little details add up to the big ones. Soccer is a thinking woman’s game and we want our players to be able to dissect what is the team doing, but while they’re doing that they can’t lose track of what the littlest details are,” she said.The Buckeyes and the Gophers are set to square off at 7:30 p.m., while the Badgers are scheduled to come to town for a noon match. read more

Ohio State Buckeyes in the NFL Week 4

Former Buckeyes Marshon Lattimore, Tyvis Powell and Darron Lee catch up during the Spring Game on April 15. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Former Photo EditorFormer Ohio State football players were in action in Week 4 of the NFL season. Of league rookies, sophomores and veterans, here are a few of the latest performances from former Buckeyes.New York Jets LB Darron LeeThe New York Jets faced the Jacksonville Jaguars Sunday, and second-year linebacker Darron Lee had an impressive game after struggling to start the season. He tallied seven  tackles (four solo, three assists) including a key tackle during the Jaguars’ drive in overtime. __________________________________New Orleans Saints WR Michael ThomasIt was just another day at the office for Saints wide receiver Michael Thomas against the Miami Dolphins in London Sunday. Thomas caught eight passes for 89 yards and a touchdown in a dominant 20-0 win.__________________________________New Orleans Saints CB Marshon LattimoreMarshon Lattimore shined Sunday as the Saints’ defense shut out the Dolphins in a 20-0 blowout. Lattimore had five tackles and a forced fumble in a dominant defensive performance. For the first time in a few seasons, the Saints have a potential star on the defensive side of the football, an encouraging sign for a team that consistently produces offensively.__________________________________Dallas Cowboys RB Ezekiel ElliottDallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott had a strong performance Sunday as the Cowboys sprinted to an early lead against the Los Angeles Rams. Elliott did a little bit of everything, rushing 21 times for 85 yards and catching four passes for 54 yards. He scored a rushing and receiving touchdown. __________________________________Pittsburgh Steelers LB Ryan ShazierThe Pittsburgh Steelers and linebacker Ryan Shazier rocked their rival, the Baltimore Ravens, 26-9. Shazier was all over the field, totalling 11 tackles along with an interception and three passes defended. The Steelers’ defense has been somewhat inconsistent on a week-to-week basis. However, Shazier has been one of the team’s more consistent performers.__________________________________Other notable players:Los Angeles Chargers defensive end Joey Bosa: six tackles against the Philadelphia EaglesIndianapolis Colts safety Malik Hooker: one interception against the Seattle SeahawksSan Francisco running back Carlos Hyde: 16 carries for 68 yards against the Arizona CardinalsCarolina Panthers wide receiver Curtis Samuel: Did not play against the New England Patriots read more

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Former Buckeyes Marshon Lattimore, Tyvis Powell and Darron Lee catch up during the Spring Game on April 15. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Former Photo EditorFormer Ohio State football players were in action in Week 4 of the NFL season. Of league rookies, sophomores and veterans, here are a few of the latest performances from former Buckeyes.New York Jets LB Darron LeeThe New York Jets faced the Jacksonville Jaguars Sunday, and second-year linebacker Darron Lee had an impressive game after struggling to start the season. He tallied seven  tackles (four solo, three assists) including a key tackle during the Jaguars’ drive in overtime. __________________________________New Orleans Saints WR Michael ThomasIt was just another day at the office for Saints wide receiver Michael Thomas against the Miami Dolphins in London Sunday. Thomas caught eight passes for 89 yards and a touchdown in a dominant 20-0 win.__________________________________New Orleans Saints CB Marshon LattimoreMarshon Lattimore shined Sunday as the Saints’ defense shut out the Dolphins in a 20-0 blowout. Lattimore had five tackles and a forced fumble in a dominant defensive performance. For the first time in a few seasons, the Saints have a potential star on the defensive side of the football, an encouraging sign for a team that consistently produces offensively.__________________________________Dallas Cowboys RB Ezekiel ElliottDallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott had a strong performance Sunday as the Cowboys sprinted to an early lead against the Los Angeles Rams. Elliott did a little bit of everything, rushing 21 times for 85 yards and catching four passes for 54 yards. He scored a rushing and receiving touchdown. __________________________________Pittsburgh Steelers LB Ryan ShazierThe Pittsburgh Steelers and linebacker Ryan Shazier rocked their rival, the Baltimore Ravens, 26-9. Shazier was all over the field, totalling 11 tackles along with an interception and three passes defended. The Steelers’ defense has been somewhat inconsistent on a week-to-week basis. However, Shazier has been one of the team’s more consistent performers.__________________________________Other notable players:Los Angeles Chargers defensive end Joey Bosa: six tackles against the Philadelphia EaglesIndianapolis Colts safety Malik Hooker: one interception against the Seattle SeahawksSan Francisco running back Carlos Hyde: 16 carries for 68 yards against the Arizona CardinalsCarolina Panthers wide receiver Curtis Samuel: Did not play against the New England Patriots read more

Football Urban Meyer prepares for Ohio States trip to the Rose Bowl

Ohio State redshirt senior wide receiver Terry McLaurin (83) celebrates with Urban Meyer after he scored a touchdown in the first half of the B1G Championship Game vs. Northwestern on Dec. 1. Ohio State won 45-24. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorComing into Sunday’s College Football Playoff selection, it was expected that Ohio State would be left on the outside, even after winning the Big Ten, finishing off a 12-1 season with a 45-24 win against then-No. 21 Northwestern.Those expectations became reality, as the Buckeyes finished No. 6, behind both No. 4 Oklahoma and No. 5 Georgia in the final College Football Playoff poll, giving Ohio State a trip to Pasadena, California for the Rose Bowl against No. 9 Washington, the Pac-12 champion.Meyer said, unlike in 2017, he was not that surprised to see his team outside of the top four.“Those are three really good teams,” Meyer said. “The last thing we’re going to do is stand up here and criticize the committee. We’re not going to do that.”Since the creation of the College Football Playoff in 2014, Ohio State has been ranked within the top seven spots in every final ranking released. Even with missing by three spots or less in any given year, Meyer said he is not calling for an eight-team playoff because it would “change the entire model of college football.”But being on the outside of the playoff does not change what Meyer thinks of the team he has this season.“I don’t want to devalue what we just did,” Meyer said. “We just won the Big Ten Championship.”Looking back at the season, Meyer sees a turning point in the year as something that occurred before he was even eligible to coach this season.During Ryan Day’s three-game tenure as acting head coach, junior defensive end Nick Bosa went down with an injury in the third quarter against TCU. The injury would end up costing Bosa his season, as he moved his efforts toward the 2019 NFL Draft.“When Nick Bosa went down, that changed our team,” Meyer said. “He was a great player, but he was so much more than that.”Many saw Oklahoma’s 12-point win against then-No. 14 Texas as the nail in the coffin for Ohio State’s playoff hopes, regardless of the events of the Alabama-Georgia matchup.Meyer agreed, saying he was worried about the Buckeyes’ playoff hopes after the Sooners came out with a victory.Even with the Sooners being placed at No. 4 as expected, the Bulldogs coming in ahead of Ohio State after a loss to the Crimson Tide came as a surprise to Meyer.Still, Meyer called Georgia a “heck of a team,” and is looking forward to the matchup against Washington on Jan. 1.As far as Meyer’s thoughts on his Heisman hopeful, redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins, who through for 499 yards and five touchdowns on Saturday, he left no doubts.“Oh he’ll be in New York,” Meyer said. “He’s going one way or another. I’ll fly him there myself.” read more

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Ohio State redshirt senior wide receiver Terry McLaurin (83) celebrates with Urban Meyer after he scored a touchdown in the first half of the B1G Championship Game vs. Northwestern on Dec. 1. Ohio State won 45-24. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorComing into Sunday’s College Football Playoff selection, it was expected that Ohio State would be left on the outside, even after winning the Big Ten, finishing off a 12-1 season with a 45-24 win against then-No. 21 Northwestern.Those expectations became reality, as the Buckeyes finished No. 6, behind both No. 4 Oklahoma and No. 5 Georgia in the final College Football Playoff poll, giving Ohio State a trip to Pasadena, California for the Rose Bowl against No. 9 Washington, the Pac-12 champion.Meyer said, unlike in 2017, he was not that surprised to see his team outside of the top four.“Those are three really good teams,” Meyer said. “The last thing we’re going to do is stand up here and criticize the committee. We’re not going to do that.”Since the creation of the College Football Playoff in 2014, Ohio State has been ranked within the top seven spots in every final ranking released. Even with missing by three spots or less in any given year, Meyer said he is not calling for an eight-team playoff because it would “change the entire model of college football.”But being on the outside of the playoff does not change what Meyer thinks of the team he has this season.“I don’t want to devalue what we just did,” Meyer said. “We just won the Big Ten Championship.”Looking back at the season, Meyer sees a turning point in the year as something that occurred before he was even eligible to coach this season.During Ryan Day’s three-game tenure as acting head coach, junior defensive end Nick Bosa went down with an injury in the third quarter against TCU. The injury would end up costing Bosa his season, as he moved his efforts toward the 2019 NFL Draft.“When Nick Bosa went down, that changed our team,” Meyer said. “He was a great player, but he was so much more than that.”Many saw Oklahoma’s 12-point win against then-No. 14 Texas as the nail in the coffin for Ohio State’s playoff hopes, regardless of the events of the Alabama-Georgia matchup.Meyer agreed, saying he was worried about the Buckeyes’ playoff hopes after the Sooners came out with a victory.Even with the Sooners being placed at No. 4 as expected, the Bulldogs coming in ahead of Ohio State after a loss to the Crimson Tide came as a surprise to Meyer.Still, Meyer called Georgia a “heck of a team,” and is looking forward to the matchup against Washington on Jan. 1.As far as Meyer’s thoughts on his Heisman hopeful, redshirt sophomore quarterback Dwayne Haskins, who through for 499 yards and five touchdowns on Saturday, he left no doubts.“Oh he’ll be in New York,” Meyer said. “He’s going one way or another. I’ll fly him there myself.” read more

BBC announces most powerful women of the last 70 years Beyonce and

first_imgWhen celebrating the most powerful women of the last 70 years, it may seem natural to host a celebration at Buckingham Palace: home to a Queen who has reigned for generations.But if anyone had hoped Her Majesty might be recognised for her contribution to women’s lives over her long service, they would be disappointed.The BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour Power List, announced on Wednesday, instead recognises Beyoncé, the singer, feminist provocateur Germaine Greer and a fictional character: the love-lorn Bridget Jones. She told guests it was a “huge pleasure to acknowledge this magnificent milestone” and said the programme’s origins as a show just for housewives had been “left far behind”.”It is a living social history charting the changing attitudes to women as well as the changing attitudes of women themselves,” she said.”So it’s not surprising that the number of listeners is higher than ever and that its audience is made up of both women and men.” Baroness Thatcher came in first in the power list It is the first time the list has encompassed a fictional character as well as women no longer with us.Previous winners include Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, campaigner Baroness Lawrence, and the Queen, who won in 2013. The Queen Beyonce, the singer Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Germaine Greer, the feminist and author Beyonce, the singer Emma Barnett, chair of judges, said of Lady Thatcher: “Love or loathe her, it is hard to think of another woman who has had more of an impact on British women than Baroness Margaret Thatcher within the last seven decades.“Anyone born in the 80s, and thereafter, grew up thinking it was normal for a woman to run the country; anyone over the age of 18 while she was in charge was shaped by her leadership style and uncompromising policies.“In fact a whole generation of women’s feminism was formed in direct retaliation to her.”Judge Julia Hobsbawm said of the inclusion of Bridget Jones: “Twenty five years ago she ushered in the voice of a woman narrating her own banality as well as her own complexity.”The seven women on the Woman’s Hour Power List 2016:Margaret Thatcher – First female British Prime Minister (1979-1990) and leader of the Conservative Party (1975-1990). Emma Barnett says: “Love or loathe her, it is hard to think of another woman who has had more of an impact on British women than Baroness Margaret Thatcher within the last seven decades. Anyone born in the 80s, and thereafter, grew up thinking it was normal for a woman to run the country; anyone over the age of 18 while she was in charge was shaped by her leadership style and uncompromising policies. In fact a whole generation of women’s feminism was formed in direct retaliation to her.”Helen Brook – Set up Brook Advisory Centres in 1964 offering contraceptive advice to unmarried women. Jill Burridge says: “I think the biggest change [of the past 70 years] was probably contraception, which freed women to think about what they did and what choices they had – in terms of whether they stayed at home or chose to develop their career. Everything has followed on from that –employment, job opportunities, all those things flowed on after the change when the pill became freely available to women.”Barbara Castle – Labour MP for Blackburn (1945-1979), brought in the Equal Pay Act in 1970. Emma Barnett says: “It would be criminal not to put Barbara Castle on that list. Every negotiation I’ve ever had I know I’ve got her standing behind me with what she put into legislation.”Germaine Greer – Australian writer, recognised as one of the major voices of the feminist movement, she published The Female Eunuch in 1970. Abi Morgan says: “She’s a warrior for me – she’s somebody who went to the frontline of feminism and said bring it on.”Jayaben Desai – Prominent leader of the strikers in the Grunwick dispute in London in 1976, campaigning against low pay and poor conditions for women workers. Ayesha Hazarika says: “She highlighted the plight of low paid women, immigrant workers, racism, trade union recognition – but also dignity, humanity and basic human rights.” Bridget Jones – Bridget Jones’s Diary published by Helen Fielding in 1996. Julia Hobsbawm says: “Twenty five years ago she ushered in the voice of a woman narrating her own banality as well as her own complexity.”Beyoncé – American singer-songwriter. Ayesha Hazarika says: “I think Beyoncé managed to do two things. She turned herself into a very successful commercial brand but with that she also put out quite a positive feminist message, right from the start. Particularly now she’s moving into race relations talking about black lives matter. And also from a beauty point of view, being a black woman who is held up as a global beauty icon at a time when beauty and pop culture is still very white.” Barbara Castle shares a cup of tea with the leaders of the female machinists’ strike from the Ford plant in Dagenham in 1968 The Duchess of Cornwall greets Dame Jenni Murray at the Buckingham Palace reception The Duchess of Cornwall greets Dame Jenni Murray at the Buckingham Palace reception Barbara Castle shares a cup of tea with the leaders of the female machinists' strike from the Ford plant in Dagenham in 1968 A spokesman for Radio 4 said debate over the selection was to be expected. Lady Thatcher and Miss Jones are joined on the final list by Helen Brook, who founded centres offering contraception to unmarried women, Barbara Castle, the Labour MP who fought for equal pay, and Jayaben Desai, a strike leader in the 1974 Grunwick dispute.Germaine Greer, the feminist and academic who has caused fury among campaigners for recent comments about transgender people, came in fourth place, with judge Abi Morgan hailing her a “warrior”.Beyoncé, the American singer, makes it onto the list at number seven in recognition of her status as a “global beauty icon”. Baroness Thatcher came in first in the power list The Duchess of Cornwall meets Germaine Greer The Duchess of Cornwall meets Germaine Greer Germaine Greer, the feminist and author The list will be announced on Woman’s Hour from 10am on Wednesday, in a programme pre-recorded at Buckingham Palace.Speaking at a reception to celebrate the show’s 70th anniversary, the Duchess of Cornwall told a crowd the programme had been part of the “soundtrack to my life”. The Queen did not make the list, despite her long serviceCredit:Getty Images The list of seven powerful women, selected by a judging panel, was topped by Baroness Thatcher, the late former prime minister who was recognised by the BBC for her impact on British women whether they “love her or loathe her”.The Queen did not make the list, with Theresa May, the current Prime Minister, also omitted along with all modern-day politicians.Instead, Woman’s House chose to honour the star of Helen Fielding’s 1996 novel, Bridget Jones’s Diary, famous for her witty take on the life of a single woman in a world of “smug marrieds”. Alice Feinstein, Woman’s Hour editor, said: “Each year the Woman’s Hour Power List aims to highlight, celebrate and create a discussion around the achievements of women who are pioneering and affecting change for women and in British society at large.“In our anniversary year it felt appropriate to take stock and recognise the women who over the past 70 years have had the biggest impact.“Of course it’s been an impossible task for our judges to compile a final list of seven but I’m pleased that this feels like an appropriately wide-ranging and impressive line-up of those who historically and today are having an impact in terms of the choices available to women in the UK in 2016.”last_img read more

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first_imgWhen celebrating the most powerful women of the last 70 years, it may seem natural to host a celebration at Buckingham Palace: home to a Queen who has reigned for generations.But if anyone had hoped Her Majesty might be recognised for her contribution to women’s lives over her long service, they would be disappointed.The BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour Power List, announced on Wednesday, instead recognises Beyoncé, the singer, feminist provocateur Germaine Greer and a fictional character: the love-lorn Bridget Jones. She told guests it was a “huge pleasure to acknowledge this magnificent milestone” and said the programme’s origins as a show just for housewives had been “left far behind”.”It is a living social history charting the changing attitudes to women as well as the changing attitudes of women themselves,” she said.”So it’s not surprising that the number of listeners is higher than ever and that its audience is made up of both women and men.” Baroness Thatcher came in first in the power list It is the first time the list has encompassed a fictional character as well as women no longer with us.Previous winners include Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, campaigner Baroness Lawrence, and the Queen, who won in 2013. The Queen Beyonce, the singer Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Germaine Greer, the feminist and author Beyonce, the singer Emma Barnett, chair of judges, said of Lady Thatcher: “Love or loathe her, it is hard to think of another woman who has had more of an impact on British women than Baroness Margaret Thatcher within the last seven decades.“Anyone born in the 80s, and thereafter, grew up thinking it was normal for a woman to run the country; anyone over the age of 18 while she was in charge was shaped by her leadership style and uncompromising policies.“In fact a whole generation of women’s feminism was formed in direct retaliation to her.”Judge Julia Hobsbawm said of the inclusion of Bridget Jones: “Twenty five years ago she ushered in the voice of a woman narrating her own banality as well as her own complexity.”The seven women on the Woman’s Hour Power List 2016:Margaret Thatcher – First female British Prime Minister (1979-1990) and leader of the Conservative Party (1975-1990). Emma Barnett says: “Love or loathe her, it is hard to think of another woman who has had more of an impact on British women than Baroness Margaret Thatcher within the last seven decades. Anyone born in the 80s, and thereafter, grew up thinking it was normal for a woman to run the country; anyone over the age of 18 while she was in charge was shaped by her leadership style and uncompromising policies. In fact a whole generation of women’s feminism was formed in direct retaliation to her.”Helen Brook – Set up Brook Advisory Centres in 1964 offering contraceptive advice to unmarried women. Jill Burridge says: “I think the biggest change [of the past 70 years] was probably contraception, which freed women to think about what they did and what choices they had – in terms of whether they stayed at home or chose to develop their career. Everything has followed on from that –employment, job opportunities, all those things flowed on after the change when the pill became freely available to women.”Barbara Castle – Labour MP for Blackburn (1945-1979), brought in the Equal Pay Act in 1970. Emma Barnett says: “It would be criminal not to put Barbara Castle on that list. Every negotiation I’ve ever had I know I’ve got her standing behind me with what she put into legislation.”Germaine Greer – Australian writer, recognised as one of the major voices of the feminist movement, she published The Female Eunuch in 1970. Abi Morgan says: “She’s a warrior for me – she’s somebody who went to the frontline of feminism and said bring it on.”Jayaben Desai – Prominent leader of the strikers in the Grunwick dispute in London in 1976, campaigning against low pay and poor conditions for women workers. Ayesha Hazarika says: “She highlighted the plight of low paid women, immigrant workers, racism, trade union recognition – but also dignity, humanity and basic human rights.” Bridget Jones – Bridget Jones’s Diary published by Helen Fielding in 1996. Julia Hobsbawm says: “Twenty five years ago she ushered in the voice of a woman narrating her own banality as well as her own complexity.”Beyoncé – American singer-songwriter. Ayesha Hazarika says: “I think Beyoncé managed to do two things. She turned herself into a very successful commercial brand but with that she also put out quite a positive feminist message, right from the start. Particularly now she’s moving into race relations talking about black lives matter. And also from a beauty point of view, being a black woman who is held up as a global beauty icon at a time when beauty and pop culture is still very white.” Barbara Castle shares a cup of tea with the leaders of the female machinists’ strike from the Ford plant in Dagenham in 1968 The Duchess of Cornwall greets Dame Jenni Murray at the Buckingham Palace reception The Duchess of Cornwall greets Dame Jenni Murray at the Buckingham Palace reception Barbara Castle shares a cup of tea with the leaders of the female machinists' strike from the Ford plant in Dagenham in 1968 A spokesman for Radio 4 said debate over the selection was to be expected. Lady Thatcher and Miss Jones are joined on the final list by Helen Brook, who founded centres offering contraception to unmarried women, Barbara Castle, the Labour MP who fought for equal pay, and Jayaben Desai, a strike leader in the 1974 Grunwick dispute.Germaine Greer, the feminist and academic who has caused fury among campaigners for recent comments about transgender people, came in fourth place, with judge Abi Morgan hailing her a “warrior”.Beyoncé, the American singer, makes it onto the list at number seven in recognition of her status as a “global beauty icon”. Baroness Thatcher came in first in the power list The Duchess of Cornwall meets Germaine Greer The Duchess of Cornwall meets Germaine Greer Germaine Greer, the feminist and author The list will be announced on Woman’s Hour from 10am on Wednesday, in a programme pre-recorded at Buckingham Palace.Speaking at a reception to celebrate the show’s 70th anniversary, the Duchess of Cornwall told a crowd the programme had been part of the “soundtrack to my life”. The Queen did not make the list, despite her long serviceCredit:Getty Images The list of seven powerful women, selected by a judging panel, was topped by Baroness Thatcher, the late former prime minister who was recognised by the BBC for her impact on British women whether they “love her or loathe her”.The Queen did not make the list, with Theresa May, the current Prime Minister, also omitted along with all modern-day politicians.Instead, Woman’s House chose to honour the star of Helen Fielding’s 1996 novel, Bridget Jones’s Diary, famous for her witty take on the life of a single woman in a world of “smug marrieds”. Alice Feinstein, Woman’s Hour editor, said: “Each year the Woman’s Hour Power List aims to highlight, celebrate and create a discussion around the achievements of women who are pioneering and affecting change for women and in British society at large.“In our anniversary year it felt appropriate to take stock and recognise the women who over the past 70 years have had the biggest impact.“Of course it’s been an impossible task for our judges to compile a final list of seven but I’m pleased that this feels like an appropriately wide-ranging and impressive line-up of those who historically and today are having an impact in terms of the choices available to women in the UK in 2016.”last_img read more

Uber drivers to ferry elderly patients home from hospital in attempt to

first_imgFinding a carer can be a nightmare, the founders of the new service sayCredit:Alamy Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Stressed person Elderly person David Mowat, the minister for care and support, said: “This is an interesting and innovative proposal which will help raise awareness of the challenges faced by the vulnerable elderly, ‎and those with specific conditions that are becoming increasingly common in our society. I look forward to hearing more about the results in due course.”Cera already offers a venture which guarantees a carer to a patient’s front door or hospital bed within four hours in some parts of the country.The start-up, which says it has just completed the largest ever seed round in European healthcare history,  is backed by the heads of Just Eat and a former director of the World Economic Forum. Uber drivers will be trained to ferry the elderly home from hospital in an attempt to tackle record levels of NHS bedblocking.Ministers hailed the deal as an “interesting and innovative” response to the challenges faced by Britain’s ageing population.The partnership between Uber and the company, Cera, means drivers will be given special training in disabilities, with access to cars which can take wheelchairs.And Cera will join forces with the country’s largest NHS trust and with three local health groups to deliver home care for patients, including those with dementia and cancer.The NHS scheme could also result in Uber drivers being used to transport patients home from hospital, or to send carers out to customers.Dr Ben Maruthappu, Cera’s co-founder, said the new plans would “revolutionise” closer working between care and transport services – improving the lives of families.“Older people and those with disabilities will now have access to the highest quality drivers, while carers will be able to efficiently travel to ensure they can provide services in the right place at the right time,” he said.“These partnerships tackle major challenges in the NHS, cracking down on bed-blocking and delayed discharges, while providing high-quality and efficient care, said Dr Maruthappu, a junior doctor.  The service run by the health start-up already allows families to book a carer online, and monitor the help given to their loved ones. Woman pill  Individual consumers will also be able to request specially trained Uber drivers to deliver paid-for care by the private care company, for those living in London.Jo Bertram, regional general manager at Uber, said the plans would improve mobility for some of society’s most vulnerable people.“Uber’s mission is for everybody to have access to reliable, safe and affordable transportation and this partnership brings us a step closer to making that a reality.“Simply by tapping a button on our app carers will be able to get to people quickly and efficiently, while those with mobility needs will have the freedom to get out and about,” she said. The NHS schemes cover a population of five million people across north London, as well as five hospitals run by Barts Health NHS Trust. The number of people who need help but do not receive it has risen by almost a fifth in a year, a report by Age UK showsCredit:PA  Families will be guaranteed a visit from a carer within four hours, once the scheme is rolled out nationally Credit:Alamylast_img read more

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first_imgFinding a carer can be a nightmare, the founders of the new service sayCredit:Alamy Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Stressed person Elderly person David Mowat, the minister for care and support, said: “This is an interesting and innovative proposal which will help raise awareness of the challenges faced by the vulnerable elderly, ‎and those with specific conditions that are becoming increasingly common in our society. I look forward to hearing more about the results in due course.”Cera already offers a venture which guarantees a carer to a patient’s front door or hospital bed within four hours in some parts of the country.The start-up, which says it has just completed the largest ever seed round in European healthcare history,  is backed by the heads of Just Eat and a former director of the World Economic Forum. Uber drivers will be trained to ferry the elderly home from hospital in an attempt to tackle record levels of NHS bedblocking.Ministers hailed the deal as an “interesting and innovative” response to the challenges faced by Britain’s ageing population.The partnership between Uber and the company, Cera, means drivers will be given special training in disabilities, with access to cars which can take wheelchairs.And Cera will join forces with the country’s largest NHS trust and with three local health groups to deliver home care for patients, including those with dementia and cancer.The NHS scheme could also result in Uber drivers being used to transport patients home from hospital, or to send carers out to customers.Dr Ben Maruthappu, Cera’s co-founder, said the new plans would “revolutionise” closer working between care and transport services – improving the lives of families.“Older people and those with disabilities will now have access to the highest quality drivers, while carers will be able to efficiently travel to ensure they can provide services in the right place at the right time,” he said.“These partnerships tackle major challenges in the NHS, cracking down on bed-blocking and delayed discharges, while providing high-quality and efficient care, said Dr Maruthappu, a junior doctor.  The service run by the health start-up already allows families to book a carer online, and monitor the help given to their loved ones. Woman pill  Individual consumers will also be able to request specially trained Uber drivers to deliver paid-for care by the private care company, for those living in London.Jo Bertram, regional general manager at Uber, said the plans would improve mobility for some of society’s most vulnerable people.“Uber’s mission is for everybody to have access to reliable, safe and affordable transportation and this partnership brings us a step closer to making that a reality.“Simply by tapping a button on our app carers will be able to get to people quickly and efficiently, while those with mobility needs will have the freedom to get out and about,” she said. The NHS schemes cover a population of five million people across north London, as well as five hospitals run by Barts Health NHS Trust. The number of people who need help but do not receive it has risen by almost a fifth in a year, a report by Age UK showsCredit:PA  Families will be guaranteed a visit from a carer within four hours, once the scheme is rolled out nationally Credit:Alamylast_img read more

Man wielding twofoot machete in Birmingham chased down by police

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. West Midlands Police have released dramatic footage from 2016 showing two officers chasing down a man wielding a two-foot machete.Iryan Brown, 20, was sentenced at Birmingham Crown Court for possessing an offensive weapon and making threats with a blade. He will be detained indefinitely at a mental health facility under the Mental Health Act.last_img read more

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first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. West Midlands Police have released dramatic footage from 2016 showing two officers chasing down a man wielding a two-foot machete.Iryan Brown, 20, was sentenced at Birmingham Crown Court for possessing an offensive weapon and making threats with a blade. He will be detained indefinitely at a mental health facility under the Mental Health Act.last_img read more

Cheeselog dimpsy and bobowler obscure dialect words to be recorded in poem

first_imgList of words:Ginnel (an alleyway), LeedsDidlum (a community savings scheme), HumbersideBobowler (a large moth), BirminghamTwitten (an alleyway), SussexCheeselog (a woodlouse), BerkshireTo twine (to complain), CumbriaTo geg in (to butt in), MerseysideOn the huh (lopsided, wonky), SuffolkDimpsy (twilight), DevonMardy (moody), LeicesterGurt (great or very), BristolFam (a familiar form of address for a friend), London Its associate editor Eleanor Maier said: “Not only were we reminded of the breadth and vitality of the country’s dialects, but we were also able to identify and research a large number of new words for future inclusion in the OED, as well as gain valuable information about the currency of local words included in the first edition of the dictionary.”Susannah Herbert, executive director of National Poetry Day, added: “In celebrating characteristic expressions chosen by listeners and the OED, these contemporary poets add richness and humour to our sense of ourselves.” A woodlouse, or cheeselog Kanye West “gegging in” to Taylor Swift’s 2009 acceptance speech  Poet Hollie McNish, one of the poets Kanye West interrupts the acceptance speech from best female video winner Taylor Swift at the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards in New York To some, they will be second nature. To others, unadulterated gibberish.But some of Britain’s most obscure dialect words including cheeselog, dimpsy, bobowler and twitten are to be recorded for posterity in poetry, and destined for the Oxford English Dictionary.The terms, nominated by members of the public, are part of the oral traditions of communities across the UK, but have so far eschewed popular written records.A dozen words, chosen from thousands of nominations, are to each be made the subject of their own poem, in aid of  National Poetry Day.center_img They include ginnel, meaning alleyway, didlum, (community savings scheme), bobowler (large moth), twitten (alleyway), cheeselog (woodlouse), to twine (complain), geg in (butt in) and on the huh (lopsided, wonky).Dimpsy (twilight), mardy (moody), gurt (great or very) and fam (way of addressing a friend) complete the list.Poets will perform new works incorporating the words on BBC local radio on September 28.Susie Dent, the broadcaster and lexicographer, said the poems “will shine a light into a lexicon that’s too often overlooked.  Poet Hollie McNish, one of the poets A woodlouse, or cheeselog Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Our local words and expressions are very much part of an oral tradition, and printed records are often hard to find,” she said.”The words reflect some of the verve and vibrancy of our local tongues. I’m probably not allowed to be biased, but Devon’s ‘dimpsy’ has long been a favourite of mine.”A poem featuring all 12 words will be performed by 19-year-old poet and spoken word artist Isaiah Hull. Some of the words will go into the next edition of the Oxford English Dictionary.last_img read more

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first_imgList of words:Ginnel (an alleyway), LeedsDidlum (a community savings scheme), HumbersideBobowler (a large moth), BirminghamTwitten (an alleyway), SussexCheeselog (a woodlouse), BerkshireTo twine (to complain), CumbriaTo geg in (to butt in), MerseysideOn the huh (lopsided, wonky), SuffolkDimpsy (twilight), DevonMardy (moody), LeicesterGurt (great or very), BristolFam (a familiar form of address for a friend), London Its associate editor Eleanor Maier said: “Not only were we reminded of the breadth and vitality of the country’s dialects, but we were also able to identify and research a large number of new words for future inclusion in the OED, as well as gain valuable information about the currency of local words included in the first edition of the dictionary.”Susannah Herbert, executive director of National Poetry Day, added: “In celebrating characteristic expressions chosen by listeners and the OED, these contemporary poets add richness and humour to our sense of ourselves.” A woodlouse, or cheeselog Kanye West “gegging in” to Taylor Swift’s 2009 acceptance speech  Poet Hollie McNish, one of the poets Kanye West interrupts the acceptance speech from best female video winner Taylor Swift at the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards in New York To some, they will be second nature. To others, unadulterated gibberish.But some of Britain’s most obscure dialect words including cheeselog, dimpsy, bobowler and twitten are to be recorded for posterity in poetry, and destined for the Oxford English Dictionary.The terms, nominated by members of the public, are part of the oral traditions of communities across the UK, but have so far eschewed popular written records.A dozen words, chosen from thousands of nominations, are to each be made the subject of their own poem, in aid of  National Poetry Day.center_img They include ginnel, meaning alleyway, didlum, (community savings scheme), bobowler (large moth), twitten (alleyway), cheeselog (woodlouse), to twine (complain), geg in (butt in) and on the huh (lopsided, wonky).Dimpsy (twilight), mardy (moody), gurt (great or very) and fam (way of addressing a friend) complete the list.Poets will perform new works incorporating the words on BBC local radio on September 28.Susie Dent, the broadcaster and lexicographer, said the poems “will shine a light into a lexicon that’s too often overlooked.  Poet Hollie McNish, one of the poets A woodlouse, or cheeselog Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Our local words and expressions are very much part of an oral tradition, and printed records are often hard to find,” she said.”The words reflect some of the verve and vibrancy of our local tongues. I’m probably not allowed to be biased, but Devon’s ‘dimpsy’ has long been a favourite of mine.”A poem featuring all 12 words will be performed by 19-year-old poet and spoken word artist Isaiah Hull. Some of the words will go into the next edition of the Oxford English Dictionary.last_img read more

Prince Charles sees Charles Is paintings reunited for first time after lending

first_img“Ladies and gentlemen, we are fortunate indeed to be in the first generation in nearly 370 years, to appreciate them as my ancestors once did.”So thank you, all of you, for all the part you have played in making this great exhibition possible.”The exhibition contains 140 items, around 90 of which have come from the Royal Collection.As well as the star Van Dyck, the Musee du Louvre, which had direct contact with the Prince of Wales’ office, also offered Titian’s Supper at Emmaus (c1534) and Conjugal Allegory (c1530-35). Titian, The Supper at Emmaus, c.1530 Those key works were taken down from the walls of State Apartments at Windsor Castle, from Hampton Court, Kensington Palace, Buckingham Palace and Clarence House, to be assembled under one roof at the Royal Academy.With that example, and the support of chairman of the Royal Collection Prince Charles, galleries one-by-one agreed to the Royal Academy borrowing some “absolutely crucial, central works”.Of the scope of the exhibition, Desmond-Shawe added: “This has never happened before and never will again. This is a really, really exceptional moment.”The show is intended to give the British public, and the Academy’s overseas visitors, their deepest insight yet into Charles I’s 1,500-strong painting collection, which was sold off piecemeal after his death to collectors and, in some notorious cases, given to tradesmen to pay off debts. Prince Charles spent 30 minutes having a private tour of the works It is considered a unique opportunity for the widest audience possible to see the works together and understand the influence it had on English artists including Reynolds, Gainsborough, Constable and Turner centuries later. The Prince of Wales with curators Desmond Shawe-Taylor (left) and Per Rumberg (right)  Van Dyck’s Charles I The Prince of Wales is presented with a book during his viewing of the Charles I: King and Collector  Rumberg said the idea to reassemble the lost collection of Charles I was not new, but had previously been considered an “exhibition of dreams” that would never happen.”The rather brave idea for this show was to make the impossible possible,” he said, explaining that the difficulty lay not only in finding works painted in Charles I’s day, but also the Renaissance paintings he had brought to England for the first time. “Curators for generations have been keen to do this,” he added. “It’s easy to dream it up, much harder to realise.” Titian, The Supper at Emmaus, c.1530 Charles I: King and Collector runs until April 15.   ‘Charles I in the Hunting Field’, 1636 The show was commissioned to celebrate 250 years of the Royal Academy of Arts, envisioned as “The Great Exhibition” spectacular enough to mark its anniversary. Anthony van Dyck, Queen Henrietta Maria with Sir Jeffrey Hudson, 1633 The Prince of Wales with curators Desmond Shawe-Taylor (left) and Per Rumberg (right) Credit:PAcenter_img Over years of concerted effort, curators Desmond Shawe-Taylor, surveyor of the Queen’s pictures, and Per Rumberg visited European galleries in person to persuade directors to loan their most precious paintings, many of which have never travelled to Britain before.Shawe-Taylor said more than 80 works had been loaned from the Royal Collection to the exhibition with the “absolutely characteristic generosity” and permission of the Queen. “Without the Prince of Wales’ support that particular loan may not have happened. Without his support, and the works from the Royal Collection, this exhibition could have never happened.” Anthony van Dyck, Queen Henrietta Maria with Sir Jeffrey Hudson, 1633 Le Brun, who said the Charles I exhibition was the “perfect” way to celebrate 250 years of the Royal Academy, added the passionate support of the arts from the Prince of Wales and the Queen was “particularly pleasing”.”The fact that we had the support of the Prince of Wales was enormously helpful in encouraging our fellow institutions to see how serious we are about the exhibition, how beautifully they [loaned paintings] would be shown, and how carefully we would look after them.” Speaking at the Royal Academy on Monday night, the Prince of Wales gave no indication that his support had helped.He told assembled luminaries: ” I suspect many of us must have longed to be time travellers back to the 17th century just to glimpse for a brief moment this great collection, but now thanks to the heroic efforts of all those involved in this overwhelmingly lovely exhibition we are able to get a real idea of what King Charles I was aiming to do in bringing to these shores for the first time some of the greatest works of art in existence.  'Charles I in the Hunting Field', 1636 In 1623, the young Prince of Wales began what would become arguably the greatest art collection ever assembled by an English king.By 1649, at the end of his doomed reign as Charles I, he saw his paintings for the last time as he walked to the scaffold, his treasures scattered to the winds of Europe, some never to be seen on English soil again. More than 350 years later, the Royal Academy has achieved the seemingly impossible: reuniting the stars of Charles I’s collection with a helping hand from no less than the current Prince of Wales.The Prince, the chairman of the honorary exhibition committee who has lent his quiet support behind the scenes, last night saw the fruits of curators’ labour in person, as he became the first member of the Royal Family to view the works in the same building since Charles I himself.Photographed in front of Van Dyck’s nine-foot-high Le Roi à la chasse, or Charles I in the Hunting Field, he was hailed by curators for his invaluable help in persuading major foreign galleries to loan their star paintings, including dialogue with the Louvre to help secure that particular work.  Saying that “usually you wouldn’t even ask for one of these” major loans, he said the finished exhibition included five extraordinary works from the Prado, three from the Louvre and others from down the road at the National Gallery.”Luckily they all understood the unique opportunity to bring these works together,” he said. Rumberg described the Prince of Wales as a “very helpful supportive figure in the background” as the collection was slowly reassembled, with his office in direct contact with the President of the Louvre over Charles I in the Hunting Field. “That was for us the key work, the most important and most moving picture that Van Dyck painted of Charles I,” he said.  Van Dyck's Charles I The Prince of Wales is presented with a book during his viewing of the Charles I: King and Collector Credit:PA Prince Charles spent 30 minutes having a private tour of the worksCredit:PA Titian’s Charles V with a Dog (1533) and Van Dyck’s Hendrik van den Bergh are being loaned by the Prado, along with items from the Frick, NY, and National Gallery of Art in Washington.Many other works, including Van Dyck’s Charles in Three Positions and Rubens’ Landscape with Saint George and the Dragon, come from the Royal Collection, acquired over the years by Kings and Queens. The Prince of Wales is chairman of the Royal Collection Trust, with paintings loaned with permission from the Queen.Numerous loans from private collections include Van Dyck’s Self-portrait with a Sunflower (around 1633), borrowed from of the Duke of Westminster while Britain’s major galleries have also contributed: key works include  Rubens’s Apotheosis of James I (1628-30) is loaned by Tate, Van Dyck’s last self-portrait (c1640) by the National Portrait Gallery, and the artist’s Charles I on Horseback, 1637-38 by the National Gallery. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Thanks to the very great generosity of other lenders, notably the Prado and the Louvre, to whom we are immensely grateful, many outstanding pictures and other works of art form Charles I’s collection have returned, some for the very first time since the 17th century, to add many layers of richness and delight.last_img read more

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first_img“Ladies and gentlemen, we are fortunate indeed to be in the first generation in nearly 370 years, to appreciate them as my ancestors once did.”So thank you, all of you, for all the part you have played in making this great exhibition possible.”The exhibition contains 140 items, around 90 of which have come from the Royal Collection.As well as the star Van Dyck, the Musee du Louvre, which had direct contact with the Prince of Wales’ office, also offered Titian’s Supper at Emmaus (c1534) and Conjugal Allegory (c1530-35). Titian, The Supper at Emmaus, c.1530 Those key works were taken down from the walls of State Apartments at Windsor Castle, from Hampton Court, Kensington Palace, Buckingham Palace and Clarence House, to be assembled under one roof at the Royal Academy.With that example, and the support of chairman of the Royal Collection Prince Charles, galleries one-by-one agreed to the Royal Academy borrowing some “absolutely crucial, central works”.Of the scope of the exhibition, Desmond-Shawe added: “This has never happened before and never will again. This is a really, really exceptional moment.”The show is intended to give the British public, and the Academy’s overseas visitors, their deepest insight yet into Charles I’s 1,500-strong painting collection, which was sold off piecemeal after his death to collectors and, in some notorious cases, given to tradesmen to pay off debts. Prince Charles spent 30 minutes having a private tour of the works It is considered a unique opportunity for the widest audience possible to see the works together and understand the influence it had on English artists including Reynolds, Gainsborough, Constable and Turner centuries later. The Prince of Wales with curators Desmond Shawe-Taylor (left) and Per Rumberg (right)  Van Dyck’s Charles I The Prince of Wales is presented with a book during his viewing of the Charles I: King and Collector  Rumberg said the idea to reassemble the lost collection of Charles I was not new, but had previously been considered an “exhibition of dreams” that would never happen.”The rather brave idea for this show was to make the impossible possible,” he said, explaining that the difficulty lay not only in finding works painted in Charles I’s day, but also the Renaissance paintings he had brought to England for the first time. “Curators for generations have been keen to do this,” he added. “It’s easy to dream it up, much harder to realise.” Titian, The Supper at Emmaus, c.1530 Charles I: King and Collector runs until April 15.   ‘Charles I in the Hunting Field’, 1636 The show was commissioned to celebrate 250 years of the Royal Academy of Arts, envisioned as “The Great Exhibition” spectacular enough to mark its anniversary. Anthony van Dyck, Queen Henrietta Maria with Sir Jeffrey Hudson, 1633 The Prince of Wales with curators Desmond Shawe-Taylor (left) and Per Rumberg (right) Credit:PAcenter_img Over years of concerted effort, curators Desmond Shawe-Taylor, surveyor of the Queen’s pictures, and Per Rumberg visited European galleries in person to persuade directors to loan their most precious paintings, many of which have never travelled to Britain before.Shawe-Taylor said more than 80 works had been loaned from the Royal Collection to the exhibition with the “absolutely characteristic generosity” and permission of the Queen. “Without the Prince of Wales’ support that particular loan may not have happened. Without his support, and the works from the Royal Collection, this exhibition could have never happened.” Anthony van Dyck, Queen Henrietta Maria with Sir Jeffrey Hudson, 1633 Le Brun, who said the Charles I exhibition was the “perfect” way to celebrate 250 years of the Royal Academy, added the passionate support of the arts from the Prince of Wales and the Queen was “particularly pleasing”.”The fact that we had the support of the Prince of Wales was enormously helpful in encouraging our fellow institutions to see how serious we are about the exhibition, how beautifully they [loaned paintings] would be shown, and how carefully we would look after them.” Speaking at the Royal Academy on Monday night, the Prince of Wales gave no indication that his support had helped.He told assembled luminaries: ” I suspect many of us must have longed to be time travellers back to the 17th century just to glimpse for a brief moment this great collection, but now thanks to the heroic efforts of all those involved in this overwhelmingly lovely exhibition we are able to get a real idea of what King Charles I was aiming to do in bringing to these shores for the first time some of the greatest works of art in existence.  'Charles I in the Hunting Field', 1636 In 1623, the young Prince of Wales began what would become arguably the greatest art collection ever assembled by an English king.By 1649, at the end of his doomed reign as Charles I, he saw his paintings for the last time as he walked to the scaffold, his treasures scattered to the winds of Europe, some never to be seen on English soil again. More than 350 years later, the Royal Academy has achieved the seemingly impossible: reuniting the stars of Charles I’s collection with a helping hand from no less than the current Prince of Wales.The Prince, the chairman of the honorary exhibition committee who has lent his quiet support behind the scenes, last night saw the fruits of curators’ labour in person, as he became the first member of the Royal Family to view the works in the same building since Charles I himself.Photographed in front of Van Dyck’s nine-foot-high Le Roi à la chasse, or Charles I in the Hunting Field, he was hailed by curators for his invaluable help in persuading major foreign galleries to loan their star paintings, including dialogue with the Louvre to help secure that particular work.  Saying that “usually you wouldn’t even ask for one of these” major loans, he said the finished exhibition included five extraordinary works from the Prado, three from the Louvre and others from down the road at the National Gallery.”Luckily they all understood the unique opportunity to bring these works together,” he said. Rumberg described the Prince of Wales as a “very helpful supportive figure in the background” as the collection was slowly reassembled, with his office in direct contact with the President of the Louvre over Charles I in the Hunting Field. “That was for us the key work, the most important and most moving picture that Van Dyck painted of Charles I,” he said.  Van Dyck's Charles I The Prince of Wales is presented with a book during his viewing of the Charles I: King and Collector Credit:PA Prince Charles spent 30 minutes having a private tour of the worksCredit:PA Titian’s Charles V with a Dog (1533) and Van Dyck’s Hendrik van den Bergh are being loaned by the Prado, along with items from the Frick, NY, and National Gallery of Art in Washington.Many other works, including Van Dyck’s Charles in Three Positions and Rubens’ Landscape with Saint George and the Dragon, come from the Royal Collection, acquired over the years by Kings and Queens. The Prince of Wales is chairman of the Royal Collection Trust, with paintings loaned with permission from the Queen.Numerous loans from private collections include Van Dyck’s Self-portrait with a Sunflower (around 1633), borrowed from of the Duke of Westminster while Britain’s major galleries have also contributed: key works include  Rubens’s Apotheosis of James I (1628-30) is loaned by Tate, Van Dyck’s last self-portrait (c1640) by the National Portrait Gallery, and the artist’s Charles I on Horseback, 1637-38 by the National Gallery. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Thanks to the very great generosity of other lenders, notably the Prado and the Louvre, to whom we are immensely grateful, many outstanding pictures and other works of art form Charles I’s collection have returned, some for the very first time since the 17th century, to add many layers of richness and delight.last_img read more

Formula One teams race to help beat Alzheimers

Formula One teams will mentor new research fellowsCredit: Charles Coates/ Getty Images Europe Scientists researching ways to beat dementia are to receive help from Formula One racing teams in an attempt to accelerate the number of breakthroughs in the prevention and treatment of the disease.Sir Jackie Stewart, the three times F1 world champion, has launched a £2 million project to see how the high-tech motor racing industry can help academics process data, promote rapid innovation and use artificial intelligence to boost research.The scheme, which sees Sir Jackie’s Race Against Dementia and Alzheimer’s Research UK join forces, will create a series of academic fellowships to promote the work of young scientist eager to help the 850,000 people in the UK living with the condition.Formula One teams from McLaren and Red Bull Racing will act as mentors to the scientists and show how their research techniques can be applied to the laboratory. It is hoped the teams behind a racing driver’s success will be able to also promote a collaborative and dynamic culture to speed up the pace of discoveries.The move follows Sir Jackie and his family’s experiences of seeing his wife, Lady Helen Stewart, suffer from the condition.She was diagnosed with the condition four years ago which resulted in Sir Jacke’s family’s world being “turned upside down”.He said: “The Race Against Dementia is the greatest challenge of my life, but with the right people and the right approach we can encourage and accelerate a new way of thinking and cross the finish line with success.“With these new research fellowships, we want to attract the best new talent from every corner of the world and not only catalyse their research with funding, but to throw open the door to a whole range of opportunities that will support a can-do mindset and accelerate a new generation of scientists to beat this horrendous illness.”Hilary Evans, Chief Executive of Alzheimer’s Research UK, the UK’s leading dementia research charity said: “These new fellowships are targeted at up-and-coming scientific global talent and will stimulate the careers of researchers with the drive and ambition to make breakthroughs possible that will transform lives.”Three years ago, McLaren Applied Technologies teamed up with the University of Oxford to try to use pitstop technology and their efficient trackside teamwork to improve treatment in emergency departments.The latest research investment comes on top of Alzheimer’s Research UK’s support for research projects worth more than £27 million in leading British universities.In a moving account, Sir Jackie Stewart explains the impact Alzheimer’s has had on his wifeIt’s been a little over four years since my wife Helen was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. It’s been heart breaking for the family to witness her decline. When people think of dementia, they most commonly think of memory decline, of losing moments and faces and the confusion and upset that ensues. Helen does have severe problems with her short term memory, which makes everyday life difficult, but the condition has also taken a profound physical toll on her. She has become frail to the point that she cannot now walk unaided. It hurts us both when she falls.Helen was uniquely talented as a timekeeper; she had razor-sharp abilities and was revered in F1 circles. Today she has no recall of even the simplest things, like where she is. It is a deeply cruel illness, not just for the person affected, but for the whole family.We are fortunate that we can provide Helen home care, but I know this is not an option for many, and there are millions of families around the world who struggle to cope when dementia arrives in their lives. My heart goes out to them and the situations they find themselves in.Over the past two years I’ve met specialists and scientists around the world who worked to diagnose Helen and help us make sense of what’s happening in her brain. We learned, with dismay, that there is no cure for dementia. The horrendous reality is that it’s been 16 years since the last dementia drug, and while that treatment can help some with their symptoms for a time, it can’t stop the destruction of the disease in their brain. It will slowly take its ultimate toll.In 2002, when Helen was diagnosed with breast cancer, we were able to access the best medical help, and through treatment she was completely cured.  It was astonishing to us to find that progress in relation to dementia has not kept pace. Of course, the brain is an incredibly complex organ, but dementia has also sadly received a small fraction of the attention, and funding, compared with diseases like cancer and heart disease, where progress has transformed lives.In my career on the track, I saw staggering technological progress. Innovation was implemented at phenomenal pace. And while lap times were shaved, we also drove dramatic advancements in safety that saved lives. At times, the resistance to change was incredible, but we simply had to rise to the challenge of halting the record of deaths.  When problems arose, we didn’t accept defeat, and answers were found. This gave me a trust in determination, and a belief now that it can, and will, be brought to bear in dementia research. I’m committed to making this possible.I established Race Against Dementia, a charity dedicated to the relentless pursuit of a dementia cure, imbued with the spirit of F1 pace and innovation. Today we are launching a £2m search for a new ambitious generation of brilliant scientists, supported by world-leading institutions, that we’ll commit to a new way of working. As well as giving these men and women the resources they need to bring their goals to reality, we’ll also inspire them with Formula 1 acumen, which will see them mentored by leading teams from F1. I believe the sparks these collaborations create will drive faster progress and even bigger thinking to create life-changing breakthroughs.Our Race Against Dementia Fellowships will get underway in earnest next year, with the support of Alzheimer’s Research UK, our partner. I eagerly anticipate their progress in identifying new ways to prevent or treat the diseases behind dementia before it becomes a devastating and overwhelming crisis for families and societies around the world. Our goal is to inject new pace into research and unlock a breakthrough to help Helen and the millions like her.We are striving to find answers that will avoid the heartache that we are experiencing, for millions in the future. In my career in motorsports, the innovations that I made possible, drove a safety revolution where many thought nothing could be done. I didn’t accept the barriers to change then, and I don’t accept them now. There are no problems, there are only solutions. The diseases behind dementia are complex and the challenge is high, but our ambition and ingenuity are higher, and the race against dementia is one we intend to win. Formula One teams will mentor new research fellows Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Formula One teams will mentor new research fellowsCredit: Charles Coates/ Getty Images Europe Scientists researching ways to beat dementia are to receive help from Formula One racing teams in an attempt to accelerate the number of breakthroughs in the prevention and treatment of the disease.Sir Jackie Stewart, the three times F1 world champion, has launched a £2 million project to see how the high-tech motor racing industry can help academics process data, promote rapid innovation and use artificial intelligence to boost research.The scheme, which sees Sir Jackie’s Race Against Dementia and Alzheimer’s Research UK join forces, will create a series of academic fellowships to promote the work of young scientist eager to help the 850,000 people in the UK living with the condition.Formula One teams from McLaren and Red Bull Racing will act as mentors to the scientists and show how their research techniques can be applied to the laboratory. It is hoped the teams behind a racing driver’s success will be able to also promote a collaborative and dynamic culture to speed up the pace of discoveries.The move follows Sir Jackie and his family’s experiences of seeing his wife, Lady Helen Stewart, suffer from the condition.She was diagnosed with the condition four years ago which resulted in Sir Jacke’s family’s world being “turned upside down”.He said: “The Race Against Dementia is the greatest challenge of my life, but with the right people and the right approach we can encourage and accelerate a new way of thinking and cross the finish line with success.“With these new research fellowships, we want to attract the best new talent from every corner of the world and not only catalyse their research with funding, but to throw open the door to a whole range of opportunities that will support a can-do mindset and accelerate a new generation of scientists to beat this horrendous illness.”Hilary Evans, Chief Executive of Alzheimer’s Research UK, the UK’s leading dementia research charity said: “These new fellowships are targeted at up-and-coming scientific global talent and will stimulate the careers of researchers with the drive and ambition to make breakthroughs possible that will transform lives.”Three years ago, McLaren Applied Technologies teamed up with the University of Oxford to try to use pitstop technology and their efficient trackside teamwork to improve treatment in emergency departments.The latest research investment comes on top of Alzheimer’s Research UK’s support for research projects worth more than £27 million in leading British universities.In a moving account, Sir Jackie Stewart explains the impact Alzheimer’s has had on his wifeIt’s been a little over four years since my wife Helen was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia. It’s been heart breaking for the family to witness her decline. When people think of dementia, they most commonly think of memory decline, of losing moments and faces and the confusion and upset that ensues. Helen does have severe problems with her short term memory, which makes everyday life difficult, but the condition has also taken a profound physical toll on her. She has become frail to the point that she cannot now walk unaided. It hurts us both when she falls.Helen was uniquely talented as a timekeeper; she had razor-sharp abilities and was revered in F1 circles. Today she has no recall of even the simplest things, like where she is. It is a deeply cruel illness, not just for the person affected, but for the whole family.We are fortunate that we can provide Helen home care, but I know this is not an option for many, and there are millions of families around the world who struggle to cope when dementia arrives in their lives. My heart goes out to them and the situations they find themselves in.Over the past two years I’ve met specialists and scientists around the world who worked to diagnose Helen and help us make sense of what’s happening in her brain. We learned, with dismay, that there is no cure for dementia. The horrendous reality is that it’s been 16 years since the last dementia drug, and while that treatment can help some with their symptoms for a time, it can’t stop the destruction of the disease in their brain. It will slowly take its ultimate toll.In 2002, when Helen was diagnosed with breast cancer, we were able to access the best medical help, and through treatment she was completely cured.  It was astonishing to us to find that progress in relation to dementia has not kept pace. Of course, the brain is an incredibly complex organ, but dementia has also sadly received a small fraction of the attention, and funding, compared with diseases like cancer and heart disease, where progress has transformed lives.In my career on the track, I saw staggering technological progress. Innovation was implemented at phenomenal pace. And while lap times were shaved, we also drove dramatic advancements in safety that saved lives. At times, the resistance to change was incredible, but we simply had to rise to the challenge of halting the record of deaths.  When problems arose, we didn’t accept defeat, and answers were found. This gave me a trust in determination, and a belief now that it can, and will, be brought to bear in dementia research. I’m committed to making this possible.I established Race Against Dementia, a charity dedicated to the relentless pursuit of a dementia cure, imbued with the spirit of F1 pace and innovation. Today we are launching a £2m search for a new ambitious generation of brilliant scientists, supported by world-leading institutions, that we’ll commit to a new way of working. As well as giving these men and women the resources they need to bring their goals to reality, we’ll also inspire them with Formula 1 acumen, which will see them mentored by leading teams from F1. I believe the sparks these collaborations create will drive faster progress and even bigger thinking to create life-changing breakthroughs.Our Race Against Dementia Fellowships will get underway in earnest next year, with the support of Alzheimer’s Research UK, our partner. I eagerly anticipate their progress in identifying new ways to prevent or treat the diseases behind dementia before it becomes a devastating and overwhelming crisis for families and societies around the world. Our goal is to inject new pace into research and unlock a breakthrough to help Helen and the millions like her.We are striving to find answers that will avoid the heartache that we are experiencing, for millions in the future. In my career in motorsports, the innovations that I made possible, drove a safety revolution where many thought nothing could be done. I didn’t accept the barriers to change then, and I don’t accept them now. There are no problems, there are only solutions. The diseases behind dementia are complex and the challenge is high, but our ambition and ingenuity are higher, and the race against dementia is one we intend to win. Formula One teams will mentor new research fellows Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Teenage girl fails to get grandfathers conviction for sexually abusing her overturned

A grandfather jailed for sexually abusing his granddaughter will not have his conviction quashed despite the 17-year-old now claiming that she invented the allegations.The man, who is 68, must continue to serve his 12-year prison sentence even though the girl, who was the main witness in the case against him, has said that she lied at his trial.Senior judges in the Court of Appeal heard how she invented the abuse as a way to gain attention from family members and friends but that after seeing her grandfather go to prison she realised she had to “do the right thing”. However the judges ruled that her original evidence at the trial in January last year at Snaresbrook crown court in London remained believable. In a ruling handed down on Friday the judges ruled that the girl, who was described as a “fragile and troubled teenager”, seemed motivated by regret that her grandfather had been imprisoned.The girl, known as M is proceedings as she cannot be named, first made the allegations about her relative to a counsellor in 2016, when she was 14. M told the counsellor that she realised that her grandfather’s behaviour was wrong only after attending sex education classes at school when she was in year eight. The counsellor reported the conversation to the police, who interviewed M the following day. Three months after the allegations were raised he faced charged of abusing the girl on several occasions when she was three or four, six or seven and eight or nine years old.The girl’s mother, M’s counsellor and a police officer all gave evidence in the trial. The man was convicted in February last year by a majority verdict of 11 to 1. The appeal was launched on the ground that the granddaughTer had given false evidence during the trial. M has now produced a 14-paragraph statement retracting the allegations against her relative. The statement says she wished to “withdraw my allegations as the alleged incidents did not in fact take place”.She says that she was “not informed of the consequences that would follow if the allegations I made were believed until after the proceedings had commenced, by which time I was too scared to say that I had lied. I now fully understand the severity of my allegations and the consequences of my actions.She went on to say that she had not liked the way her grandfather had treated her mother and “this gave me the idea” to make false allegations against him. The teenager went on to say: “I now realise the severity of my actions and sincerely regret them. After my grandfather went to prison, I knew I had to do the right thing and tell the truth. “I am making this statement because it is the right thing to do and I want to tell the truth. I am truly sorry for what I have done.”The retraction was supported by her mother, who during the trial was forced to deny that she had prompted her daughter to make the allegations because of her own dislike of her father-in-law.Concluding the trial it was ruled that there was “no proper basis for rejecting M’s original evidence”, adding: “We reject the veracity and reliability of her subsequent retraction statement, put in after sentence was announced.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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A grandfather jailed for sexually abusing his granddaughter will not have his conviction quashed despite the 17-year-old now claiming that she invented the allegations.The man, who is 68, must continue to serve his 12-year prison sentence even though the girl, who was the main witness in the case against him, has said that she lied at his trial.Senior judges in the Court of Appeal heard how she invented the abuse as a way to gain attention from family members and friends but that after seeing her grandfather go to prison she realised she had to “do the right thing”. However the judges ruled that her original evidence at the trial in January last year at Snaresbrook crown court in London remained believable. In a ruling handed down on Friday the judges ruled that the girl, who was described as a “fragile and troubled teenager”, seemed motivated by regret that her grandfather had been imprisoned.The girl, known as M is proceedings as she cannot be named, first made the allegations about her relative to a counsellor in 2016, when she was 14. M told the counsellor that she realised that her grandfather’s behaviour was wrong only after attending sex education classes at school when she was in year eight. The counsellor reported the conversation to the police, who interviewed M the following day. Three months after the allegations were raised he faced charged of abusing the girl on several occasions when she was three or four, six or seven and eight or nine years old.The girl’s mother, M’s counsellor and a police officer all gave evidence in the trial. The man was convicted in February last year by a majority verdict of 11 to 1. The appeal was launched on the ground that the granddaughTer had given false evidence during the trial. M has now produced a 14-paragraph statement retracting the allegations against her relative. The statement says she wished to “withdraw my allegations as the alleged incidents did not in fact take place”.She says that she was “not informed of the consequences that would follow if the allegations I made were believed until after the proceedings had commenced, by which time I was too scared to say that I had lied. I now fully understand the severity of my allegations and the consequences of my actions.She went on to say that she had not liked the way her grandfather had treated her mother and “this gave me the idea” to make false allegations against him. The teenager went on to say: “I now realise the severity of my actions and sincerely regret them. After my grandfather went to prison, I knew I had to do the right thing and tell the truth. “I am making this statement because it is the right thing to do and I want to tell the truth. I am truly sorry for what I have done.”The retraction was supported by her mother, who during the trial was forced to deny that she had prompted her daughter to make the allegations because of her own dislike of her father-in-law.Concluding the trial it was ruled that there was “no proper basis for rejecting M’s original evidence”, adding: “We reject the veracity and reliability of her subsequent retraction statement, put in after sentence was announced.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Englands steepest street declared to be a hill

Locals are forced to tie their cars to lamppostsCredit:SWNS Locals are forced to tie their cars to lampposts England’s steepest street has been named by the Ordnance Survey for the first time as as a hill in Bristol, where residents tie their cars to lampposts to stop them from rolling away.Bristol’s residential Vale Street has the steepest gradient in England with a slope of 22-degrees.  It measures in at four degrees steeper than Old Wyche Road in Worcestershire at 17.54 degrees, and is followed by roads in Sheffield, Lincoln and Dorset.Mat Goren, who lives on the street, said the only way to tackle the hill was to walk up it “like a mountaineer, with a slow pace”.Fellow resident Julie Wheat, who has lived on the street for two decades, said driving and parking on the street were particularly problematic. “You whack [the car] into first gear, put your foot down and hope nobody is coming down because once you have started, you have just got to keep going,” she said.A spokesman for the Ordnance Survey said: “The calculation first involved defining the steepest section of the road, then cutting it into 5m chunks, then applying more software to interpret the maximum and average slope data from the grid for each 5m piece of road. “Then the results have been put back together to give the average slope across the length of each road.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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Locals are forced to tie their cars to lamppostsCredit:SWNS Locals are forced to tie their cars to lampposts England’s steepest street has been named by the Ordnance Survey for the first time as as a hill in Bristol, where residents tie their cars to lampposts to stop them from rolling away.Bristol’s residential Vale Street has the steepest gradient in England with a slope of 22-degrees.  It measures in at four degrees steeper than Old Wyche Road in Worcestershire at 17.54 degrees, and is followed by roads in Sheffield, Lincoln and Dorset.Mat Goren, who lives on the street, said the only way to tackle the hill was to walk up it “like a mountaineer, with a slow pace”.Fellow resident Julie Wheat, who has lived on the street for two decades, said driving and parking on the street were particularly problematic. “You whack [the car] into first gear, put your foot down and hope nobody is coming down because once you have started, you have just got to keep going,” she said.A spokesman for the Ordnance Survey said: “The calculation first involved defining the steepest section of the road, then cutting it into 5m chunks, then applying more software to interpret the maximum and average slope data from the grid for each 5m piece of road. “Then the results have been put back together to give the average slope across the length of each road.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Police warning over dating app killer after Battersea murder

He has since been allowed home, but his flat had been ransacked while he was unconscious and laptops, mobile phones, a wallet and cash stolen.Detectives arrested a 24-year-old man and a 17-year-old girl on suspicion of murder and theft on Tuesday. The man was also arrested for rape, and both have been released, pending further inquiries.The investigation is being led by Detective Chief Inspector Rob Pack, of the Met’s Homicide and Major Crime Command.DCI Pack, said: “We have linked these two incidents through our suspects and our enquiries continue to establish the exact circumstances.”We know the victim in the Walthamstow incident met the male suspect through a social networking site and we are investigating whether there is a similar connection in Mr Murphy’s death.”Both incidents happened over a short period of time and thorough enquiries have led us to make these prompt arrests.”However, there is a possibility other offences may have been committed before 30 May.”He added: “I would also be keen to talk to anyone who saw anything suspicious on the afternoon of June 4 around Lombard Road, anything that looked out of place.”On Tuesday June 4th at 6.38pm police were called by the London Ambulance Service to a block of flats in Lombard Road after the body of a man was found. “She has been released under investigation.” Police have issued a warning over a suspected dating app killer after a murder in Battersea was linked to a robbery and a rape of another man days earlier. The body of 43-year-old Adrian Murphy was found at an address on the banks of the Thames in Battersea, south London, last week and police have arrested a man and a teenage girl on suspicion of murder and theft. Tests failed to establish the exact cause of his death, but police say property had been stolen from the premises, and believe he was lured to the flat after chatting with a stranger on Grindr.Detectives are now linking the death of Mr Murphy, who lived in nearby Wandsworth, to the rape and robbery of a 40-year-old man who had invited a man he had met online to his flat 15 miles away in Walthamstow, east London, five days earlier.Police fear there may be further victims, and have asked any men who believe they may have been attacked in similar circumstances to come forward.The Walthamstow rape victim believes he was drugged by the man he invited to his flat on Thursday, May 30.He was found unconscious later that day by a pal and was rushed to hospital. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Officers attended and the man was pronounced dead at the scene.”Next of kin have been informed and the man has been identified as Adrian Murphy, aged 43, from the Wandsworth area.”A post-mortem at St George’s Hospital on Wednesday June 6th failed to determine a cause of death and we await the result of further tests.”Property was stolen from the premises where Mr Murphy was found.”Enquiries have linked this incident to an earlier allegation of rape at an address in Walthamstow on Thursday May 30th at around 1pm.”The 40-year-old victim believes he was drugged by a man he had invited to his flat after meeting him on a social networking platform.”He became unconscious and was found later that day by a friend who raised the alarm.”The victim was taken to Whipps Cross Hospital and has since been discharged.”His flat had been ransacked while he was unconscious and property including laptops, mobile phones, a wallet and cash, stolen.”A 24-year-old man was arrested late on Tuesday June 12th on suspicion of murder, rape and theft. He has since been bailed to attend a police station at a later date.”A 17-year-old girl was arrested earlier on June 12th on suspicion of murder and theft. read more

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He has since been allowed home, but his flat had been ransacked while he was unconscious and laptops, mobile phones, a wallet and cash stolen.Detectives arrested a 24-year-old man and a 17-year-old girl on suspicion of murder and theft on Tuesday. The man was also arrested for rape, and both have been released, pending further inquiries.The investigation is being led by Detective Chief Inspector Rob Pack, of the Met’s Homicide and Major Crime Command.DCI Pack, said: “We have linked these two incidents through our suspects and our enquiries continue to establish the exact circumstances.”We know the victim in the Walthamstow incident met the male suspect through a social networking site and we are investigating whether there is a similar connection in Mr Murphy’s death.”Both incidents happened over a short period of time and thorough enquiries have led us to make these prompt arrests.”However, there is a possibility other offences may have been committed before 30 May.”He added: “I would also be keen to talk to anyone who saw anything suspicious on the afternoon of June 4 around Lombard Road, anything that looked out of place.”On Tuesday June 4th at 6.38pm police were called by the London Ambulance Service to a block of flats in Lombard Road after the body of a man was found. “She has been released under investigation.” Police have issued a warning over a suspected dating app killer after a murder in Battersea was linked to a robbery and a rape of another man days earlier. The body of 43-year-old Adrian Murphy was found at an address on the banks of the Thames in Battersea, south London, last week and police have arrested a man and a teenage girl on suspicion of murder and theft. Tests failed to establish the exact cause of his death, but police say property had been stolen from the premises, and believe he was lured to the flat after chatting with a stranger on Grindr.Detectives are now linking the death of Mr Murphy, who lived in nearby Wandsworth, to the rape and robbery of a 40-year-old man who had invited a man he had met online to his flat 15 miles away in Walthamstow, east London, five days earlier.Police fear there may be further victims, and have asked any men who believe they may have been attacked in similar circumstances to come forward.The Walthamstow rape victim believes he was drugged by the man he invited to his flat on Thursday, May 30.He was found unconscious later that day by a pal and was rushed to hospital. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Officers attended and the man was pronounced dead at the scene.”Next of kin have been informed and the man has been identified as Adrian Murphy, aged 43, from the Wandsworth area.”A post-mortem at St George’s Hospital on Wednesday June 6th failed to determine a cause of death and we await the result of further tests.”Property was stolen from the premises where Mr Murphy was found.”Enquiries have linked this incident to an earlier allegation of rape at an address in Walthamstow on Thursday May 30th at around 1pm.”The 40-year-old victim believes he was drugged by a man he had invited to his flat after meeting him on a social networking platform.”He became unconscious and was found later that day by a friend who raised the alarm.”The victim was taken to Whipps Cross Hospital and has since been discharged.”His flat had been ransacked while he was unconscious and property including laptops, mobile phones, a wallet and cash, stolen.”A 24-year-old man was arrested late on Tuesday June 12th on suspicion of murder, rape and theft. He has since been bailed to attend a police station at a later date.”A 17-year-old girl was arrested earlier on June 12th on suspicion of murder and theft. read more

Persons with disabilities brave rain for day of sports

Defying the weather, Guyanese of all ages with disabilities were given the opportunity on Thursday to participate in a friendly competition at the National Park Tarmac.Persons with disabilities being treated to a day of sports d at the National Park Tarmac (Leroy Lyttle photo)This is the third consecutive year the Day of Sports is being hosted by the Ptolemy Reid Rehabilitation Centre (PPRC). This year PRRC collaborated with the Rehabilitation Department of the Palms Geriatric Home where amputees engaged in competition with persons who suffered a stroke.Planning for the eight sporting activities began in January with the aim of improving the participants’ socialisation and physical capabilities.Elders waiting for the rain to ease so they can participate in the games (Leroy Lyttle photo)One of the coordinators Vanessa Wickham explained, “Ultimately, the goal is to get these persons into society before they would have suffered an amputation or stroke. So, when they participate in a race they can realise their physical capabilities and this will motivate them, boost their confidence and self-esteem.”An occupational therapist at the Palms Geriatric Home Deorani Baboolall noted the sporting event will raise awareness of the programmes available at the two institutions.The day was filled with wheelchair races, shot put, assisted device races, lime and spoon races, cup stacking, dominoes, buns eating competitions and distribution of prizes.Donations to the event were made by Food for the Poor and Banks DIH. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedCulture Ministry geared for Mashramani activitiesJanuary 17, 2015In “Business”11 young people with disabilities equipped with new skillsMay 10, 2019In “latest news”Ptolemy Reid Rehab Centre commissions $8M ramp on International Day of Persons with DisabilitiesDecember 3, 2013In “Local News” read more

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Defying the weather, Guyanese of all ages with disabilities were given the opportunity on Thursday to participate in a friendly competition at the National Park Tarmac.Persons with disabilities being treated to a day of sports d at the National Park Tarmac (Leroy Lyttle photo)This is the third consecutive year the Day of Sports is being hosted by the Ptolemy Reid Rehabilitation Centre (PPRC). This year PRRC collaborated with the Rehabilitation Department of the Palms Geriatric Home where amputees engaged in competition with persons who suffered a stroke.Planning for the eight sporting activities began in January with the aim of improving the participants’ socialisation and physical capabilities.Elders waiting for the rain to ease so they can participate in the games (Leroy Lyttle photo)One of the coordinators Vanessa Wickham explained, “Ultimately, the goal is to get these persons into society before they would have suffered an amputation or stroke. So, when they participate in a race they can realise their physical capabilities and this will motivate them, boost their confidence and self-esteem.”An occupational therapist at the Palms Geriatric Home Deorani Baboolall noted the sporting event will raise awareness of the programmes available at the two institutions.The day was filled with wheelchair races, shot put, assisted device races, lime and spoon races, cup stacking, dominoes, buns eating competitions and distribution of prizes.Donations to the event were made by Food for the Poor and Banks DIH. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedCulture Ministry geared for Mashramani activitiesJanuary 17, 2015In “Business”11 young people with disabilities equipped with new skillsMay 10, 2019In “latest news”Ptolemy Reid Rehab Centre commissions $8M ramp on International Day of Persons with DisabilitiesDecember 3, 2013In “Local News” read more

Gubbträsk shows great promise for Lappland Goldminers

first_imgIn Sweden, at the end of July/beginning of August excavation work was carried out underneath a previously discovered boulder, which when analysed showed grades of over 30% Pb and 283 g/t Ag. The excavation resulted in the discovery of around 15 additional strongly lead/silver mineralized boulders. The mother lode for the boulders is thought to be located close to the site of the discovery. Lappland Goldminers has initiated a drilling program, comprising 22 holes totalling 2,200 m, to upgrade the previously encountered gold, zinc-lead-silver mineralization to an indicated mineral resource. The new discovery of boulders with galena will be further explored, with an expanded excavation program and with geochemical sampling, in order to locate the source of the rich boulder discovery at Gubbträsk.The entire project is situated within the company’s exploration permit ‘Gubbträsk no 1′, located some 100 km northwest of Lycksele. It includes 1,802 ha at Gubbträsk in an area with well-developed infrastructure. The company holds adjacent exploration permits for 2,447 ha. The distance to Lappland Goldminers’ planned concentrator plant in Fäboliden is about 70 km.The zinc-lead-silver mineralization is found in brecciated meta-greywackes and the gold-arsenopyrite mineralization in quarts-skarn rich zones where the meta-sediments and the volcanites meet. A large number of gold-arsenic and zinc-lead-silver anomalies have been encountered during the geochemical sampling. Many of these anomalies have been intersected with diamond drilling.Lappland Goldminers has secured a number of gold deposits along the so-called Guldlinjen (The Gold Line) in Västerbotten. The company’s strategy is to develop a profitable, producing mining company with centrally located processing plants in Fäboliden in Sweden and in the Haveri area in Finland, which are supplied with ore from one or several mines through the company’s own exploration, or alternatively through acquisitions.last_img read more

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first_imgIn Sweden, at the end of July/beginning of August excavation work was carried out underneath a previously discovered boulder, which when analysed showed grades of over 30% Pb and 283 g/t Ag. The excavation resulted in the discovery of around 15 additional strongly lead/silver mineralized boulders. The mother lode for the boulders is thought to be located close to the site of the discovery. Lappland Goldminers has initiated a drilling program, comprising 22 holes totalling 2,200 m, to upgrade the previously encountered gold, zinc-lead-silver mineralization to an indicated mineral resource. The new discovery of boulders with galena will be further explored, with an expanded excavation program and with geochemical sampling, in order to locate the source of the rich boulder discovery at Gubbträsk.The entire project is situated within the company’s exploration permit ‘Gubbträsk no 1′, located some 100 km northwest of Lycksele. It includes 1,802 ha at Gubbträsk in an area with well-developed infrastructure. The company holds adjacent exploration permits for 2,447 ha. The distance to Lappland Goldminers’ planned concentrator plant in Fäboliden is about 70 km.The zinc-lead-silver mineralization is found in brecciated meta-greywackes and the gold-arsenopyrite mineralization in quarts-skarn rich zones where the meta-sediments and the volcanites meet. A large number of gold-arsenic and zinc-lead-silver anomalies have been encountered during the geochemical sampling. Many of these anomalies have been intersected with diamond drilling.Lappland Goldminers has secured a number of gold deposits along the so-called Guldlinjen (The Gold Line) in Västerbotten. The company’s strategy is to develop a profitable, producing mining company with centrally located processing plants in Fäboliden in Sweden and in the Haveri area in Finland, which are supplied with ore from one or several mines through the company’s own exploration, or alternatively through acquisitions.last_img read more

Actively seeking leasing and joint venture partners

first_imgRussell Industries is actively seeking leasing and joint venture partners to work its 255 Unpatented uranium and vanadium mining claims located in San Juan County, Utah, USA. “For the foreseeable future demand for uranium will grow far faster than the present world production. The successful nuclear power initiatives enjoyed by France and Japan are forcing other countries to evaluate their present dependence on coal and petroleum and their subsequent harmful environmental effects,” said Rick Berman, President and CEO, Russell Industries. In April 2007, Ron Hochstein, President and Chief Operating Officer of Denison Mines, was quoted in the San Juan Record  saying: “I foresee San Juan County being the centre of the uranium industry in the US long into the future.” The only federally-licensed and operating uranium mill in the US is White Mesa mill, owned by Denison Mines and it is located less than 50 km from any of the four claim ranges owned by Russell IndustriesRussell Industries is a Nevada Corporation that was incorporated in 1997. It is a holding company that will possibly acquire assets in the energy, mining, healthcare and financial industries.Russell Industries, Inc.Rick Berman, +1 832-631-6099Fax: +1 832-631-6274irrsds@aol.comlast_img read more

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first_imgRussell Industries is actively seeking leasing and joint venture partners to work its 255 Unpatented uranium and vanadium mining claims located in San Juan County, Utah, USA. “For the foreseeable future demand for uranium will grow far faster than the present world production. The successful nuclear power initiatives enjoyed by France and Japan are forcing other countries to evaluate their present dependence on coal and petroleum and their subsequent harmful environmental effects,” said Rick Berman, President and CEO, Russell Industries. In April 2007, Ron Hochstein, President and Chief Operating Officer of Denison Mines, was quoted in the San Juan Record  saying: “I foresee San Juan County being the centre of the uranium industry in the US long into the future.” The only federally-licensed and operating uranium mill in the US is White Mesa mill, owned by Denison Mines and it is located less than 50 km from any of the four claim ranges owned by Russell IndustriesRussell Industries is a Nevada Corporation that was incorporated in 1997. It is a holding company that will possibly acquire assets in the energy, mining, healthcare and financial industries.Russell Industries, Inc.Rick Berman, +1 832-631-6099Fax: +1 832-631-6274irrsds@aol.comlast_img read more