Sleep With Live Tigers at England’s One-of-a-kind Tiger Lodge

first_img World’s First Luxury Space Hotel Promises Climbing Wall, Low-Gravity Basketball Courts Next Editors’ Recommendations As a general rule, most men shy away from sleeping among live tigers. But, one boutique hotel in the United Kingdom provides a surprising — and bucket list-worthy twist — on the otherwise dangerous concept and manages to do a lot of good for wildlife conservation in the process.The aptly named Tiger Lodge is a one-of-a-kind boutique hotel situated on the Port Lympne Reserve in Kent, England. The lodge is embedded inside a live tiger den with large, panoramic windows through which hotel guests can survey the wild cat’s daily goings-on. Just to be clear: sleeping guests can literally crash within feet of one of the world’s most fearsome apex predators. The exclusive two-bedroom space is available to just four guests at a time. However, the purpose-built lodge is kitted out with a beautiful rustic decor, plus luxury amenities like a log-burning fireplace, a reading library, a 4K TV, and a unique raw-wood-and-tile bathroom with Bamford toiletries. A private balcony (not inside the tiger’s den, incidentally) affords views that stretch more than 30 miles across the reserve, all the way to the English Channel.Port Lympne Reserve is a first-class wildlife reserve in one of England’s most beautiful regions. More than 700 animals from 88 species call the massive property home. It’s a full-service property that offers photography walks, Segway tours, fishing expeditions, and hot air balloon rides, plus all-day restaurants cafes, and bars. Overnight guests are afforded additional VIP access that includes after-hours tours before the park opens in the morning and after it closes each evening. A golf cart is also provided to Lodge guests, as are night-vision binoculars for after-dark safaris.On paper, the park might boast an “amusement park/zoo/safari” vibe, but there’s a lot of good going on behind the scenes. The Port Lympne reserve is part of The Aspinall Foundation — a well-respected international conservation charity that has worked since 1984 to save endangered species in the United Kingdom and abroad. They’re especially well-renowned for their work in releasing captive and bred animals into safe wilderness preserves throughout the world.This bucket list-worthy experience doesn’t come cheap. Low season rates start at £375 (approximately $500 USD) nightly, while peak season runs up to £800 (more than $1,000 USD) per night. If it helps ease the financial pain, though, know that all profits at Port Lympne Reserve help spare rare wildlife species around the world. Sleep With the Wolves in Canada’s Parc Omega Escape to the Pacific Northwest at Hoh Rainforest Caravan Cabins center_img Previous Learn Guitar (and Don’t Give Up) With the Fender Play App 1 of 5 Nevada’s Massacre Rim Named Latest International Dark Sky Sanctuarylast_img read more

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first_img World’s First Luxury Space Hotel Promises Climbing Wall, Low-Gravity Basketball Courts Next Editors’ Recommendations As a general rule, most men shy away from sleeping among live tigers. But, one boutique hotel in the United Kingdom provides a surprising — and bucket list-worthy twist — on the otherwise dangerous concept and manages to do a lot of good for wildlife conservation in the process.The aptly named Tiger Lodge is a one-of-a-kind boutique hotel situated on the Port Lympne Reserve in Kent, England. The lodge is embedded inside a live tiger den with large, panoramic windows through which hotel guests can survey the wild cat’s daily goings-on. Just to be clear: sleeping guests can literally crash within feet of one of the world’s most fearsome apex predators. The exclusive two-bedroom space is available to just four guests at a time. However, the purpose-built lodge is kitted out with a beautiful rustic decor, plus luxury amenities like a log-burning fireplace, a reading library, a 4K TV, and a unique raw-wood-and-tile bathroom with Bamford toiletries. A private balcony (not inside the tiger’s den, incidentally) affords views that stretch more than 30 miles across the reserve, all the way to the English Channel.Port Lympne Reserve is a first-class wildlife reserve in one of England’s most beautiful regions. More than 700 animals from 88 species call the massive property home. It’s a full-service property that offers photography walks, Segway tours, fishing expeditions, and hot air balloon rides, plus all-day restaurants cafes, and bars. Overnight guests are afforded additional VIP access that includes after-hours tours before the park opens in the morning and after it closes each evening. A golf cart is also provided to Lodge guests, as are night-vision binoculars for after-dark safaris.On paper, the park might boast an “amusement park/zoo/safari” vibe, but there’s a lot of good going on behind the scenes. The Port Lympne reserve is part of The Aspinall Foundation — a well-respected international conservation charity that has worked since 1984 to save endangered species in the United Kingdom and abroad. They’re especially well-renowned for their work in releasing captive and bred animals into safe wilderness preserves throughout the world.This bucket list-worthy experience doesn’t come cheap. Low season rates start at £375 (approximately $500 USD) nightly, while peak season runs up to £800 (more than $1,000 USD) per night. If it helps ease the financial pain, though, know that all profits at Port Lympne Reserve help spare rare wildlife species around the world. Sleep With the Wolves in Canada’s Parc Omega Escape to the Pacific Northwest at Hoh Rainforest Caravan Cabins center_img Previous Learn Guitar (and Don’t Give Up) With the Fender Play App 1 of 5 Nevada’s Massacre Rim Named Latest International Dark Sky Sanctuarylast_img read more

Syria joint OPCWUN chemical weapons team reports visits to nearly all declared

“Interaction with UN remains excellent and cooperation from Syrian authorities complete,” said OPCW spokesperson Michael Luhan, telling reporters at a press conference in The Hague, that the weapons inspectors on the ground had visited 18 of the 23 sites declared by Syria and that the team is proceeding with “functional destruction” to ensure the sites are inoperable.Specifically, he said the joint team is concentrating on destroying “what we call the critical equipment that is at the heart of the production facility, or that runs the mixing and filling units. That critical equipment will be destroyed, rendering the production facilities and equipment inoperable, unusable.”He said that “low tech, quick and cheap” methods were being used, such as filling equipment with concrete or smashing it, sometimes using heavy vehicles.With destruction activities now conducted at nearly all the relevant sites in Syria, he said: “It means that [Syria] will no longer have the capability to produce any more chemical weapons, and it will no longer have any working equipment to mix and to fill chemical weapons agent into munitions.” With that being achieved, the OPCW expects to meet the 1 November deadline set by the agency, he said.The Security Council formally approved the first-ever joint United Nations mission with the Nobel Peace Prize-winning global chemical weapons watchdog on 11 October. Earlier this month, the UN Security Council endorsed Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s plan to deploy up to 100 UN and OPCW experts in a multi-phase operation to carry out its resolution on eliminating Syria’s chemical weapons material and equipment, scheduled for completion by 30 June, 2014.The Council passed its resolution after Syria agreed to join the Chemical Weapons Convention following a chemical weapons attack in August that killed hundreds of people in a Damascus suburb, in a conflict that has already killed over 100,000 people and driven some 6.5 million others from their homes since protesters first sought the ouster of President Bashar al-Assad’s Government in March, 2011. read more

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“Interaction with UN remains excellent and cooperation from Syrian authorities complete,” said OPCW spokesperson Michael Luhan, telling reporters at a press conference in The Hague, that the weapons inspectors on the ground had visited 18 of the 23 sites declared by Syria and that the team is proceeding with “functional destruction” to ensure the sites are inoperable.Specifically, he said the joint team is concentrating on destroying “what we call the critical equipment that is at the heart of the production facility, or that runs the mixing and filling units. That critical equipment will be destroyed, rendering the production facilities and equipment inoperable, unusable.”He said that “low tech, quick and cheap” methods were being used, such as filling equipment with concrete or smashing it, sometimes using heavy vehicles.With destruction activities now conducted at nearly all the relevant sites in Syria, he said: “It means that [Syria] will no longer have the capability to produce any more chemical weapons, and it will no longer have any working equipment to mix and to fill chemical weapons agent into munitions.” With that being achieved, the OPCW expects to meet the 1 November deadline set by the agency, he said.The Security Council formally approved the first-ever joint United Nations mission with the Nobel Peace Prize-winning global chemical weapons watchdog on 11 October. Earlier this month, the UN Security Council endorsed Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s plan to deploy up to 100 UN and OPCW experts in a multi-phase operation to carry out its resolution on eliminating Syria’s chemical weapons material and equipment, scheduled for completion by 30 June, 2014.The Council passed its resolution after Syria agreed to join the Chemical Weapons Convention following a chemical weapons attack in August that killed hundreds of people in a Damascus suburb, in a conflict that has already killed over 100,000 people and driven some 6.5 million others from their homes since protesters first sought the ouster of President Bashar al-Assad’s Government in March, 2011. read more