Etihad to loan pilots to competing UAE airline Emirates

first_img\R Dubai, Jun 24 (AP) Long-haul airline Etihad Airways will loan pilots to competing Dubai-based carrier Emirates under a new program, officials acknowledged today, marking a rare cooperation between the two state-owned carriers who operate only 115 kilometers apart.There’s always been competition between Emirates, founded by Dubai’s rulers in 1985, and Etihad, begun by Abu Dhabi’s rulers in 2003. But the secondment program between the two comes as Emirates faces a pilot shortage and Etihad still struggles with its business after last week posting a loss of $1.52 billion in the last fiscal year.In a statement, Emirates described the move as “a common practice in our industry which gives airlines more flexibility in managing their pilot resources.” The Dubai-based airline did not offer specifics on the program, nor say how many pilots from Etihad would be flying with the carrier.Etihad did not immediately respond to a request for comment. A letter sent to pilots from Etihad described the program as seconding pilots two years after they passed a selection process.Emirates CEO Tim Clark acknowledged in April that the airline was “a tad short in pilots” and that could affect routes. Emirates has a fleet of 266 aircraft that fly to 160 destinations around the world. The airline made a profit of $762 million off revenues of $25.2 billion in the last fiscal year and its name graces sporting events around the world.For Etihad, the airline has struggled. It suffered a second consecutive annual loss this year and has reduced its fleet from 119 to 115. Its strategy of aggressively buying stakes in airlines from Europe to Australia to compete against Emirates and fellow rival Qatar Airways exposed the company to major losses.advertisementThe two Mideast carriers also saw business hurt by President Donald Trump’s travel bans affecting Muslim-majority nations and stricter rules on electronics in cabins.Emirates and Etihad are both government-owned airlines in the UAE, a federation of seven sheikhdoms on the Arabian Peninsula. Both compete in the long-haul carrier market, using their nation’s location between East and West to their advantage.(AP) AMSAMSlast_img read more

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first_img\R Dubai, Jun 24 (AP) Long-haul airline Etihad Airways will loan pilots to competing Dubai-based carrier Emirates under a new program, officials acknowledged today, marking a rare cooperation between the two state-owned carriers who operate only 115 kilometers apart.There’s always been competition between Emirates, founded by Dubai’s rulers in 1985, and Etihad, begun by Abu Dhabi’s rulers in 2003. But the secondment program between the two comes as Emirates faces a pilot shortage and Etihad still struggles with its business after last week posting a loss of $1.52 billion in the last fiscal year.In a statement, Emirates described the move as “a common practice in our industry which gives airlines more flexibility in managing their pilot resources.” The Dubai-based airline did not offer specifics on the program, nor say how many pilots from Etihad would be flying with the carrier.Etihad did not immediately respond to a request for comment. A letter sent to pilots from Etihad described the program as seconding pilots two years after they passed a selection process.Emirates CEO Tim Clark acknowledged in April that the airline was “a tad short in pilots” and that could affect routes. Emirates has a fleet of 266 aircraft that fly to 160 destinations around the world. The airline made a profit of $762 million off revenues of $25.2 billion in the last fiscal year and its name graces sporting events around the world.For Etihad, the airline has struggled. It suffered a second consecutive annual loss this year and has reduced its fleet from 119 to 115. Its strategy of aggressively buying stakes in airlines from Europe to Australia to compete against Emirates and fellow rival Qatar Airways exposed the company to major losses.advertisementThe two Mideast carriers also saw business hurt by President Donald Trump’s travel bans affecting Muslim-majority nations and stricter rules on electronics in cabins.Emirates and Etihad are both government-owned airlines in the UAE, a federation of seven sheikhdoms on the Arabian Peninsula. Both compete in the long-haul carrier market, using their nation’s location between East and West to their advantage.(AP) AMSAMSlast_img read more

Arena resigns from U.S. national team

first_imgUnited States Bruce Arena resigns from U.S. national team Mike Slane Last updated 2 years ago 22:33 10/13/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Bruce Arena USA El Salvador United States World Cup The former Galaxy coach left his U.S. role after the national team failed to qualify for the World Cup for the first time since 1986 Bruce Arena has resigned as the coach of the United States national team.U.S. Soccer released a statement from Arena on Friday, just three days after a 2-1 loss in Trinidad & Tobago eliminated the U.S. team from World Cup contention. The Stars and Stripes had qualified for the past seven World Cups prior to the worst night in the history of the U.S. program.”It is the greatest privilege for any coach to manage their country’s National Team, and as I leave that role today I am honored and grateful to have had that opportunity twice in my career,” Arena said in a statement. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. “When I took the job last November, I knew there was a great challenge ahead, probably more than most people could appreciate. Everyone involved in the program gave everything they hadfor the last 11 months, and in the end we came up short. No excuses. We didn’t get the job done, and I accept responsibility.”The 66-year-old, who previously coached the U.S. from 1998 to 2006, took over following the firing of Jurgen Klinsmann in November. He led the U.S. to a 10-2-6 record in his second stint, winning the Gold Cup title in July, but oversaw a side that collapsed late in qualifying while failing to secure a World Cup berth for the first time since 1986.NEWS: Bruce Arena has resigned as #USMNT head coach » https://t.co/R8UKP2xXex pic.twitter.com/iLwpKiuriN— U.S. Soccer (@ussoccer) October 13, 2017U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati has yet to name a replacement.Arena had drawn scrutiny for his lineup choices against Trinidad & Tobago, as he eschewed the heavy rotation he used in past qualifiers and chose the same starting XI that recorded a 4-0 win over Panama on Friday in Orlando, Florida.Arena defended his decision by pointing to the fact that the Soca Warriors made minimal adjustments after their own match Friday, a 3-1 loss in Mexico.”You can say I could’ve played this guy, that guy, and then you’d come back the next day if we had lost and said, ‘Why did you make those changes and play those guys?'” Arena told the Washington Post.”The job we have doesn’t allow us to be the Monday morning quarterback. [T&T] played almost the same team that played against Mexico on Friday, so there’s no difference. So that’s all a bunch of baloney. It has nothing to do with formations or not making changes. We didn’t get the job done.”Arena quote gfxArena also chose not to call in some of the key players from the Klinsmann era. He left out many of the national team’s European-based players, opting to feature an MLS-heavy side for the final two World Cup qualifiers.Stoke City defender Geoff Cameron was benched in favor of Omar Gonzalez, while Arena kept his entire German-American contigent at home. Borussia Moenchengladbach starter Fabian Johnson was the main absence, with Timmy Chandler and Danny Williams also being left out.The future of the U.S. program is now completely up in the air. Gulati is up for re-election, but fans, former players and media are calling for changes at the very top to right the ship. And Arena’s departure is a start, with Tab Ramos expected to take over coaching duties as the search for a long-term replacement begins.last_img read more

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first_imgUnited States Bruce Arena resigns from U.S. national team Mike Slane Last updated 2 years ago 22:33 10/13/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Bruce Arena USA El Salvador United States World Cup The former Galaxy coach left his U.S. role after the national team failed to qualify for the World Cup for the first time since 1986 Bruce Arena has resigned as the coach of the United States national team.U.S. Soccer released a statement from Arena on Friday, just three days after a 2-1 loss in Trinidad & Tobago eliminated the U.S. team from World Cup contention. The Stars and Stripes had qualified for the past seven World Cups prior to the worst night in the history of the U.S. program.”It is the greatest privilege for any coach to manage their country’s National Team, and as I leave that role today I am honored and grateful to have had that opportunity twice in my career,” Arena said in a statement. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. “When I took the job last November, I knew there was a great challenge ahead, probably more than most people could appreciate. Everyone involved in the program gave everything they hadfor the last 11 months, and in the end we came up short. No excuses. We didn’t get the job done, and I accept responsibility.”The 66-year-old, who previously coached the U.S. from 1998 to 2006, took over following the firing of Jurgen Klinsmann in November. He led the U.S. to a 10-2-6 record in his second stint, winning the Gold Cup title in July, but oversaw a side that collapsed late in qualifying while failing to secure a World Cup berth for the first time since 1986.NEWS: Bruce Arena has resigned as #USMNT head coach » https://t.co/R8UKP2xXex pic.twitter.com/iLwpKiuriN— U.S. Soccer (@ussoccer) October 13, 2017U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati has yet to name a replacement.Arena had drawn scrutiny for his lineup choices against Trinidad & Tobago, as he eschewed the heavy rotation he used in past qualifiers and chose the same starting XI that recorded a 4-0 win over Panama on Friday in Orlando, Florida.Arena defended his decision by pointing to the fact that the Soca Warriors made minimal adjustments after their own match Friday, a 3-1 loss in Mexico.”You can say I could’ve played this guy, that guy, and then you’d come back the next day if we had lost and said, ‘Why did you make those changes and play those guys?'” Arena told the Washington Post.”The job we have doesn’t allow us to be the Monday morning quarterback. [T&T] played almost the same team that played against Mexico on Friday, so there’s no difference. So that’s all a bunch of baloney. It has nothing to do with formations or not making changes. We didn’t get the job done.”Arena quote gfxArena also chose not to call in some of the key players from the Klinsmann era. He left out many of the national team’s European-based players, opting to feature an MLS-heavy side for the final two World Cup qualifiers.Stoke City defender Geoff Cameron was benched in favor of Omar Gonzalez, while Arena kept his entire German-American contigent at home. Borussia Moenchengladbach starter Fabian Johnson was the main absence, with Timmy Chandler and Danny Williams also being left out.The future of the U.S. program is now completely up in the air. Gulati is up for re-election, but fans, former players and media are calling for changes at the very top to right the ship. And Arena’s departure is a start, with Tab Ramos expected to take over coaching duties as the search for a long-term replacement begins.last_img read more

Mane makes Champions League history

first_imgUEFA Champions League Mane makes Champions League history for Liverpool’s ‘Fab Three’ Chris Burton Last updated 1 year ago 04:28 5/27/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Sadio Mane Liverpool Real Madrid Champions League final 260518 Getty UEFA Champions League Real Madrid v Liverpool Mohamed Salah Sadio Mané Real Madrid Liverpool African All Stars The Reds forward was among the goals in a final encounter with Real Madrid, allowing him to join Mohamed Salah and Roberto Firmino in double figures Sadio Mane’s goal against Real Madrid saw Liverpool make Champions League history, with three players reaching double figures in the competition.Mohamed Salah has been the undoubted star of the show for the Reds in 2017-18, but the Egyptian forward was forced off against the Blancos inside half-an-hour.An unfortunate shoulder injury robbed Jurgen Klopp of his 44-goal frontman, but Mane and fellow ‘Fab Three’ member Roberto Firmino remained on the field. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Goalkeeper crisis! Walker to the rescue but City sweating on Ederson injury ahead of Liverpool clash Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Sorry, Cristiano! Pjanic is Juventus’ most important player right now The former got Liverpool back into the tie in Kiev after a remarkable mistake from Loris Karius gifted Karim Benzema and Madrid the lead.After Dejan Lovren rose above Sergio Ramos to nod a corner into the six-yard box, Mane stuck out a boot to turn the ball past Keylor Navas.That effort, on the grandest of stages, was the Senegalese star’s 10th in European competition this season.Salah and Firmino have also hit that mark this term, with Liverpool making continental history as a result.10 – Liverpool are the first team in history to see three players score 10+ goals in a single Champions League season (Salah 10, Firmino 10, Mané 10). Trio. #RMALIV pic.twitter.com/L95krx8QXO — OptaJoe (@OptaJoe) May 26, 2018 Mane was not able to savour his effort for long, though, as a stunning overhead kick from Gareth Bale shortly after stepping off the bench restored Madrid’s lead.He is, however, the first player from his country to have netted in a Champions League final, and can take pride in that.1 – Sadio Mané is the first Senegalese 🇸🇳 player in European Cup/Champions League history to score in a final. Critical. pic.twitter.com/3QzdvV0isz — OptaJose (@OptaJose) May 26, 2018 Goals had been expected in Kiev as two attack-minded sides locked horns, and neither disappointed after a cagey opening. Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more

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first_imgUEFA Champions League Mane makes Champions League history for Liverpool’s ‘Fab Three’ Chris Burton Last updated 1 year ago 04:28 5/27/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Sadio Mane Liverpool Real Madrid Champions League final 260518 Getty UEFA Champions League Real Madrid v Liverpool Mohamed Salah Sadio Mané Real Madrid Liverpool African All Stars The Reds forward was among the goals in a final encounter with Real Madrid, allowing him to join Mohamed Salah and Roberto Firmino in double figures Sadio Mane’s goal against Real Madrid saw Liverpool make Champions League history, with three players reaching double figures in the competition.Mohamed Salah has been the undoubted star of the show for the Reds in 2017-18, but the Egyptian forward was forced off against the Blancos inside half-an-hour.An unfortunate shoulder injury robbed Jurgen Klopp of his 44-goal frontman, but Mane and fellow ‘Fab Three’ member Roberto Firmino remained on the field. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Goalkeeper crisis! Walker to the rescue but City sweating on Ederson injury ahead of Liverpool clash Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Sorry, Cristiano! Pjanic is Juventus’ most important player right now The former got Liverpool back into the tie in Kiev after a remarkable mistake from Loris Karius gifted Karim Benzema and Madrid the lead.After Dejan Lovren rose above Sergio Ramos to nod a corner into the six-yard box, Mane stuck out a boot to turn the ball past Keylor Navas.That effort, on the grandest of stages, was the Senegalese star’s 10th in European competition this season.Salah and Firmino have also hit that mark this term, with Liverpool making continental history as a result.10 – Liverpool are the first team in history to see three players score 10+ goals in a single Champions League season (Salah 10, Firmino 10, Mané 10). Trio. #RMALIV pic.twitter.com/L95krx8QXO — OptaJoe (@OptaJoe) May 26, 2018 Mane was not able to savour his effort for long, though, as a stunning overhead kick from Gareth Bale shortly after stepping off the bench restored Madrid’s lead.He is, however, the first player from his country to have netted in a Champions League final, and can take pride in that.1 – Sadio Mané is the first Senegalese 🇸🇳 player in European Cup/Champions League history to score in a final. Critical. pic.twitter.com/3QzdvV0isz — OptaJose (@OptaJose) May 26, 2018 Goals had been expected in Kiev as two attack-minded sides locked horns, and neither disappointed after a cagey opening. Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more

Hagi’s son Ianis joins Genk

first_imgGenk have signed Ianis Hagi, the son of Romania great Gheorghe.Hagi joins the Belgian side, who will play in the Champions League next term, on a five-year deal.Genk are reported to have paid €8 million to sign the 20-year-old, who joins from Viitorul Constanta in his native Romania. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare The sale is the biggest in the Romanian league’s history, surpassing the fee Anderlecht paid to sign Nicolae Stanciu in 2016.Viitorul Constanta is owned by his father, the Romanian legend, who founded the club in 2009 and currently serves as the club’s manager. The young midfielder was born in Turkey while his father shined for Galatasaray and scored his first senior goal at age 16.Hagi moves to Genk after scoring two goals for Romania at last month’s European Under-21 ChampionshipHe joined Fiorentina in 2016 as he looked to make his own path and step away from his father’s shadow, but the youngster made only two Serie A appearances for the club before heading back to Viitorul.The elder Hagi has since criticized the Serie A club’s path, likening them to Romanian dictatorship of general Nicolae Ceausescu, between 1967 and 1989.Playing under father Gheorghe, he scored 10 league goals for the club last term to earn his Genk switch.The 20-year-old star has also earned five caps for Romania after making his senior debut for his country this past November.Gheorge Hagi is regarded as one of the best players of the 1980s and 1990s, having represented Romania in three World Cups.He truly forged his reputation in 1994 in the U.S. as he was named to that World Cup’s All-Star Team and earned a fourth-place finish in that year’s Ballon d’Or voting.One of few players to play for both Real Madrid and Barcelona, Hagi is remembered for his time with Turkish side Galatasaray as well as stints with Brescia, Sportul Studentesc, Farul Constanța and Steaua Bucuresti throughout his 19-year career.Genk finished atop the Belgian league’s tables in both the regular season and championship rounds, winning six and drawing twice in 10 matches in the latter to win the title.last_img read more

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first_imgGenk have signed Ianis Hagi, the son of Romania great Gheorghe.Hagi joins the Belgian side, who will play in the Champions League next term, on a five-year deal.Genk are reported to have paid €8 million to sign the 20-year-old, who joins from Viitorul Constanta in his native Romania. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare The sale is the biggest in the Romanian league’s history, surpassing the fee Anderlecht paid to sign Nicolae Stanciu in 2016.Viitorul Constanta is owned by his father, the Romanian legend, who founded the club in 2009 and currently serves as the club’s manager. The young midfielder was born in Turkey while his father shined for Galatasaray and scored his first senior goal at age 16.Hagi moves to Genk after scoring two goals for Romania at last month’s European Under-21 ChampionshipHe joined Fiorentina in 2016 as he looked to make his own path and step away from his father’s shadow, but the youngster made only two Serie A appearances for the club before heading back to Viitorul.The elder Hagi has since criticized the Serie A club’s path, likening them to Romanian dictatorship of general Nicolae Ceausescu, between 1967 and 1989.Playing under father Gheorghe, he scored 10 league goals for the club last term to earn his Genk switch.The 20-year-old star has also earned five caps for Romania after making his senior debut for his country this past November.Gheorge Hagi is regarded as one of the best players of the 1980s and 1990s, having represented Romania in three World Cups.He truly forged his reputation in 1994 in the U.S. as he was named to that World Cup’s All-Star Team and earned a fourth-place finish in that year’s Ballon d’Or voting.One of few players to play for both Real Madrid and Barcelona, Hagi is remembered for his time with Turkish side Galatasaray as well as stints with Brescia, Sportul Studentesc, Farul Constanța and Steaua Bucuresti throughout his 19-year career.Genk finished atop the Belgian league’s tables in both the regular season and championship rounds, winning six and drawing twice in 10 matches in the latter to win the title.last_img read more

I’ve tried to copy Smriti Mandhana since she used to wear glasses: Riyan Parag

first_img Indo-Asian News Service JaipurMay 20, 2019UPDATED: May 20, 2019 11:55 IST Riyan Parag impressed for Rajasthan Royals during IPL 2019 (IANS Photo)HIGHLIGHTSSmriti Mandhana is among the few batters Parag admires and takes inspiration fromPerhaps, Parag is one of the few male cricketers who admit of being an ardent fan of women cricketersHe also revealed his experience of playing in the IPL17-year-old batsman Riyan Parag, who rose to fame after he helped Rajasthan Royals beat Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) in one of their fixtures in the recently concluded Indian Premier League (IPL), has admitted he admires leading woman batter Smriti Mandhana and tries to copy her style of batting.Mandhana is among the few batters Parag admires and takes inspiration from.”My dad is one of them (idols). He has to be the first one. Then there’s Sachin (Tendulkar) sir and Virat Kohli. And in women’s cricket, I’ve followed Smriti Mandhana since she used to wear glasses and play with a BAS bat. I was really young then. I love the way she times the ball and caresses it through point. I’ve tried copying that as well but it didn’t work out,” Parag said on the sidelines Red Bull Campus Cricket event in Jaipur.Perhaps, Parag is one of the few male cricketers who admit of being an ardent fan of women cricketers.He also revealed his experience of playing in the IPL. “I have learnt a lot from my first IPL stint. In IPL, you play with your idols and legends of the game. Just to share the dressing room was surreal,” Parag said.He further said that he doesn’t like to bat in the nets as he feels ‘locked’. “Actually, I hate batting in the nets. It’s just the closed environment. I feel someone has got a hold of me and I am like captured and locked.””Even before the matches, I try to hit as many sixes as possible,” he added.advertisementWhen quizzed about his most challenging moment from this year’s IPL, Parag said: “The time I felt really nervous this season was before the match against Kolkata Knight Riders. I don’t have a great record at the Eden Gardens. Before the KKR game, I’d scored nine runs in each of the three innings I’d played there. So the knock I played that day is the most special one for me this season. I feel pressure brings out my A-game,” he said.In that match, Rajasthan Royals were in serious trouble chasing 176 but Parag (47 off 31 balls) first joined forces with Shreyas Gopal and then with Jofra Archer to leave KKR fans at the Eden Gardens stunned.When asked if he reads about the comments made on social media about him, Parag said, “Yes, I do. I had this conversation with Ben Stokes after the Mumbai Indians match this season, where I did well and contributed with the bat. I asked him if he reads comments online and he said that he does no matter how he performed on the field that day.”You can’t really hide from that. If you post something on Instagram, people are going to tell you things to your face. And you’re bound to read those comments. But like I said, it’s all about keeping things simple and not thinking about it too much,” he added.Also Read | Playing for India my goal, says Riyan Parag after impressive IPL 2019Also Read | Riyan Parag to Alzarri Joseph: Youngsters who brought IPL 2019 aliveFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAjay Tiwari Tags :Follow Riyan ParagFollow IPL 2019Follow Smriti Mandhana I’ve tried to copy Smriti Mandhana since she used to wear glasses: Riyan ParagRiyan Parag, who did well for Rajasthan Royals at IPL 2019, admitted to idolizing the India Women opener Smriti Mandhana along with Virat Kohli and Sachin Tendulkaradvertisementlast_img read more

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first_img Indo-Asian News Service JaipurMay 20, 2019UPDATED: May 20, 2019 11:55 IST Riyan Parag impressed for Rajasthan Royals during IPL 2019 (IANS Photo)HIGHLIGHTSSmriti Mandhana is among the few batters Parag admires and takes inspiration fromPerhaps, Parag is one of the few male cricketers who admit of being an ardent fan of women cricketersHe also revealed his experience of playing in the IPL17-year-old batsman Riyan Parag, who rose to fame after he helped Rajasthan Royals beat Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) in one of their fixtures in the recently concluded Indian Premier League (IPL), has admitted he admires leading woman batter Smriti Mandhana and tries to copy her style of batting.Mandhana is among the few batters Parag admires and takes inspiration from.”My dad is one of them (idols). He has to be the first one. Then there’s Sachin (Tendulkar) sir and Virat Kohli. And in women’s cricket, I’ve followed Smriti Mandhana since she used to wear glasses and play with a BAS bat. I was really young then. I love the way she times the ball and caresses it through point. I’ve tried copying that as well but it didn’t work out,” Parag said on the sidelines Red Bull Campus Cricket event in Jaipur.Perhaps, Parag is one of the few male cricketers who admit of being an ardent fan of women cricketers.He also revealed his experience of playing in the IPL. “I have learnt a lot from my first IPL stint. In IPL, you play with your idols and legends of the game. Just to share the dressing room was surreal,” Parag said.He further said that he doesn’t like to bat in the nets as he feels ‘locked’. “Actually, I hate batting in the nets. It’s just the closed environment. I feel someone has got a hold of me and I am like captured and locked.””Even before the matches, I try to hit as many sixes as possible,” he added.advertisementWhen quizzed about his most challenging moment from this year’s IPL, Parag said: “The time I felt really nervous this season was before the match against Kolkata Knight Riders. I don’t have a great record at the Eden Gardens. Before the KKR game, I’d scored nine runs in each of the three innings I’d played there. So the knock I played that day is the most special one for me this season. I feel pressure brings out my A-game,” he said.In that match, Rajasthan Royals were in serious trouble chasing 176 but Parag (47 off 31 balls) first joined forces with Shreyas Gopal and then with Jofra Archer to leave KKR fans at the Eden Gardens stunned.When asked if he reads about the comments made on social media about him, Parag said, “Yes, I do. I had this conversation with Ben Stokes after the Mumbai Indians match this season, where I did well and contributed with the bat. I asked him if he reads comments online and he said that he does no matter how he performed on the field that day.”You can’t really hide from that. If you post something on Instagram, people are going to tell you things to your face. And you’re bound to read those comments. But like I said, it’s all about keeping things simple and not thinking about it too much,” he added.Also Read | Playing for India my goal, says Riyan Parag after impressive IPL 2019Also Read | Riyan Parag to Alzarri Joseph: Youngsters who brought IPL 2019 aliveFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byAjay Tiwari Tags :Follow Riyan ParagFollow IPL 2019Follow Smriti Mandhana I’ve tried to copy Smriti Mandhana since she used to wear glasses: Riyan ParagRiyan Parag, who did well for Rajasthan Royals at IPL 2019, admitted to idolizing the India Women opener Smriti Mandhana along with Virat Kohli and Sachin Tendulkaradvertisementlast_img read more

Amendments to Municipal Legislation Give More Flexibility

first_img allow the municipal council to hold in-camera meetings for confidential intergovernmental matters clarify that council may make policies that require a special majority to decide a question during a council meeting allow infrastructure charges for new or expanded recreational, fire and library facilities in a subdivision by-law include a justice of the peace as an issuing authority for orders to enter a property make it optional for HRM to survey and prepare a description of property when considering to expropriate it harmonize provisions for regulating development near airports Changes to the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM) Charter and the Municipal Government Act will give HRM more flexibility and discretion to make decisions. The six amendments were requested by the municipality to give it additional decision-making power, clarify provisions and correct inconsistencies in the legislation. “These amendments ensure legislation is clear and consistent,” said Municipal Affairs Minister Mark Furey. “The proposed changes to the HRM charter will ensure the municipality will have the flexibility it needs to govern and administer efficiently, effectively and it aligns with council’s long-term planning.” The proposed amendments will:last_img read more

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first_img allow the municipal council to hold in-camera meetings for confidential intergovernmental matters clarify that council may make policies that require a special majority to decide a question during a council meeting allow infrastructure charges for new or expanded recreational, fire and library facilities in a subdivision by-law include a justice of the peace as an issuing authority for orders to enter a property make it optional for HRM to survey and prepare a description of property when considering to expropriate it harmonize provisions for regulating development near airports Changes to the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM) Charter and the Municipal Government Act will give HRM more flexibility and discretion to make decisions. The six amendments were requested by the municipality to give it additional decision-making power, clarify provisions and correct inconsistencies in the legislation. “These amendments ensure legislation is clear and consistent,” said Municipal Affairs Minister Mark Furey. “The proposed changes to the HRM charter will ensure the municipality will have the flexibility it needs to govern and administer efficiently, effectively and it aligns with council’s long-term planning.” The proposed amendments will:last_img read more

Another Rajapaksa loyalist removed from Ministerial post

The Chief Minister of the Southern Province Shan Wijayalal de Silva has taken over the post from Weerasinghe.The Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) has in recent days sacked Rajapaksa loyalists from key posts in an attempt to ensure continued support in the party for President Maithripala Sirisena. (Colombo Gazette) Another loyalist of former President Mahinda Rajapaksa has been removed from his Ministerial post.Southern Provincial Council member Weerasumana Weerasinghe was today removed from his post of Sports Minister of the Southern Provincial Council. read more

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The Chief Minister of the Southern Province Shan Wijayalal de Silva has taken over the post from Weerasinghe.The Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) has in recent days sacked Rajapaksa loyalists from key posts in an attempt to ensure continued support in the party for President Maithripala Sirisena. (Colombo Gazette) Another loyalist of former President Mahinda Rajapaksa has been removed from his Ministerial post.Southern Provincial Council member Weerasumana Weerasinghe was today removed from his post of Sports Minister of the Southern Provincial Council. read more

Actively seeking leasing and joint venture partners

first_imgRussell Industries is actively seeking leasing and joint venture partners to work its 255 Unpatented uranium and vanadium mining claims located in San Juan County, Utah, USA. “For the foreseeable future demand for uranium will grow far faster than the present world production. The successful nuclear power initiatives enjoyed by France and Japan are forcing other countries to evaluate their present dependence on coal and petroleum and their subsequent harmful environmental effects,” said Rick Berman, President and CEO, Russell Industries. In April 2007, Ron Hochstein, President and Chief Operating Officer of Denison Mines, was quoted in the San Juan Record  saying: “I foresee San Juan County being the centre of the uranium industry in the US long into the future.” The only federally-licensed and operating uranium mill in the US is White Mesa mill, owned by Denison Mines and it is located less than 50 km from any of the four claim ranges owned by Russell IndustriesRussell Industries is a Nevada Corporation that was incorporated in 1997. It is a holding company that will possibly acquire assets in the energy, mining, healthcare and financial industries.Russell Industries, Inc.Rick Berman, +1 832-631-6099Fax: +1 832-631-6274irrsds@aol.comlast_img read more

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first_imgRussell Industries is actively seeking leasing and joint venture partners to work its 255 Unpatented uranium and vanadium mining claims located in San Juan County, Utah, USA. “For the foreseeable future demand for uranium will grow far faster than the present world production. The successful nuclear power initiatives enjoyed by France and Japan are forcing other countries to evaluate their present dependence on coal and petroleum and their subsequent harmful environmental effects,” said Rick Berman, President and CEO, Russell Industries. In April 2007, Ron Hochstein, President and Chief Operating Officer of Denison Mines, was quoted in the San Juan Record  saying: “I foresee San Juan County being the centre of the uranium industry in the US long into the future.” The only federally-licensed and operating uranium mill in the US is White Mesa mill, owned by Denison Mines and it is located less than 50 km from any of the four claim ranges owned by Russell IndustriesRussell Industries is a Nevada Corporation that was incorporated in 1997. It is a holding company that will possibly acquire assets in the energy, mining, healthcare and financial industries.Russell Industries, Inc.Rick Berman, +1 832-631-6099Fax: +1 832-631-6274irrsds@aol.comlast_img read more

The Evening Fix now with added pug puppy

first_imgPigeons in the Cabra area of Dublin, Tuesday February 19, 2013. (Niall Carson/PA Wire)HERE ARE THE things we learned, loved and shared today.THINGS WE LEARNED: #MAGDALENES: Enda Kenny broke into tears as he concluded a historic State apology to the victims of the Magdalene Laundries in the Dáil this evening. The apology came two weeks after an inter-departmental committee formally outlined a significant State involvement in the committal of over 10,000 women to the Laundries between the 1920s and 1990s.#MURDER: A man has been charged with the murder of Olivia Dunlea, 36, who died in “violent circumstances” before a fire at her home in Passage West, Cork, on Sunday. Darren Murphy, 36, appeared before Cork City Court today.#IRISH LIFE: The Government has reached a deal to sell Irish Life to the Canadian company Great-West Lifeco for €1.3 billion. The Irish Life name will be retained as part of the deal and the life and pensions operations of Great-West Lifeco’s Irish subsidiary, Canada Life, will be combined with those of Irish Life.#IBRC: The Taoiseach has said it is not yet clear whether credit unions will lose “millions” of euros in the liquidation of IBRC, in response to a rumour circulating that claims credit unions could lose up to €17 million worth of investments with the former State-owned bank. Enda Kenny said the liquidator will have to analyse the situation.#OSCAR PISTORIUS: Athlete Oscar Pistorius has today told a South African court that he did not intend to kill his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, who died from gunshot wounds sustained at his house several days ago. Pistorius testified that he had inadvertently shot Steenkamp after mistaking her for an intruder.#SEPTIC TANKS: The national inspection plan for septic tanks has been published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in a move  welcomed by Environment Minister. Phil Hogan the plan it will “underpin the risk-based inspection of septic tanks and other on-site treatment systems” and thanked all of the householders who have registered their domestic waste water treatment systems – describing those who supported the legislation as the “silent majority”Awww… two-year-old Eva Bray looks at a blooming Magnolia campbellii flower in the Trebah Gardens in Cornwall, as spring arrives in the south-west peninsula before the rest of the country. (Simon Burt/PA Wire)THINGS WE LOVED:Today, we mostly loved making anagrams of our names using nifty website Anyagrams (via @nadineoregan). Someone in Journal HQ will now forever be known by the – frankly excellent -appellation Vanilla Grey.Last week, US TV host Jimmy Kimmel asked his male viewers to give their wives and girlfriends the most unromantic present they could think of…. and they didn’t disappoint.(But don’t let that kill your faith in the less-than-fair sex… check out what one man did for his girlfriend after her 10-year-old beagle passed away.)Uploaded by 30poundman via BuzzfeedTHINGS WE SHARED: Twenty-five writers talk about the importance of libraries – and why they aren’t the “sentimental” institutions they are currently being painted as in some quarters.You might think you can rely on your memory but false eyewitness reports are a leading cause of wrongful convictions… The Atlantic looks at the problem with police line-ups.Facebook says there is not place on the network for hate speech, violent images or other inappropriate content – so why does content that seems to glorify rape and domestic abuse keep appearing, asks Laura Bates on the Guardian. An Indian labourer sun dries red chillies at Shertha village, outskirts of Ahmadabad, India, Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013. Millions of Indians earn their livelihood from agriculture.(AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)last_img read more

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first_imgPigeons in the Cabra area of Dublin, Tuesday February 19, 2013. (Niall Carson/PA Wire)HERE ARE THE things we learned, loved and shared today.THINGS WE LEARNED: #MAGDALENES: Enda Kenny broke into tears as he concluded a historic State apology to the victims of the Magdalene Laundries in the Dáil this evening. The apology came two weeks after an inter-departmental committee formally outlined a significant State involvement in the committal of over 10,000 women to the Laundries between the 1920s and 1990s.#MURDER: A man has been charged with the murder of Olivia Dunlea, 36, who died in “violent circumstances” before a fire at her home in Passage West, Cork, on Sunday. Darren Murphy, 36, appeared before Cork City Court today.#IRISH LIFE: The Government has reached a deal to sell Irish Life to the Canadian company Great-West Lifeco for €1.3 billion. The Irish Life name will be retained as part of the deal and the life and pensions operations of Great-West Lifeco’s Irish subsidiary, Canada Life, will be combined with those of Irish Life.#IBRC: The Taoiseach has said it is not yet clear whether credit unions will lose “millions” of euros in the liquidation of IBRC, in response to a rumour circulating that claims credit unions could lose up to €17 million worth of investments with the former State-owned bank. Enda Kenny said the liquidator will have to analyse the situation.#OSCAR PISTORIUS: Athlete Oscar Pistorius has today told a South African court that he did not intend to kill his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, who died from gunshot wounds sustained at his house several days ago. Pistorius testified that he had inadvertently shot Steenkamp after mistaking her for an intruder.#SEPTIC TANKS: The national inspection plan for septic tanks has been published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in a move  welcomed by Environment Minister. Phil Hogan the plan it will “underpin the risk-based inspection of septic tanks and other on-site treatment systems” and thanked all of the householders who have registered their domestic waste water treatment systems – describing those who supported the legislation as the “silent majority”Awww… two-year-old Eva Bray looks at a blooming Magnolia campbellii flower in the Trebah Gardens in Cornwall, as spring arrives in the south-west peninsula before the rest of the country. (Simon Burt/PA Wire)THINGS WE LOVED:Today, we mostly loved making anagrams of our names using nifty website Anyagrams (via @nadineoregan). Someone in Journal HQ will now forever be known by the – frankly excellent -appellation Vanilla Grey.Last week, US TV host Jimmy Kimmel asked his male viewers to give their wives and girlfriends the most unromantic present they could think of…. and they didn’t disappoint.(But don’t let that kill your faith in the less-than-fair sex… check out what one man did for his girlfriend after her 10-year-old beagle passed away.)Uploaded by 30poundman via BuzzfeedTHINGS WE SHARED: Twenty-five writers talk about the importance of libraries – and why they aren’t the “sentimental” institutions they are currently being painted as in some quarters.You might think you can rely on your memory but false eyewitness reports are a leading cause of wrongful convictions… The Atlantic looks at the problem with police line-ups.Facebook says there is not place on the network for hate speech, violent images or other inappropriate content – so why does content that seems to glorify rape and domestic abuse keep appearing, asks Laura Bates on the Guardian. An Indian labourer sun dries red chillies at Shertha village, outskirts of Ahmadabad, India, Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013. Millions of Indians earn their livelihood from agriculture.(AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)last_img read more

Mother releases harrowing video of daughter suffering seizures in bid to access

first_img Short URL Tuesday 21 Feb 2017, 6:57 PM Share510 Tweet Email WARNING. Some viewers may find the below clip distressing. Source: TheJournal.ie/YouTubeA MOTHER HAS released harrowing images of her young daughter suffering from seizures to put pressure on health officials to speed up her access to potentially life-changing medication.Vera Twomey released a video to Tv3 News of her daughter Ava suffering from a severe seizure.Ava suffers from Dravet Syndrome, a debilitating condition which can see her suffer as many as 20 seizures every day.Dravet Syndrome is a rare form of epilepsy that is resistant to drugs. However, Vera says that a form of medicinal marijuana can help her daughter.Ava was on a medication called Charlotte’s Web – a cannabis extract – to help reduce the frequency of her seizures – which it did.Charlotte’s Web contains very little THC – which causes the psychoactive “high” associated with cannabis use.From the time Ava began taking Charlotte’s Web on 2 October until the end of that month, she only had seven seizures. This compared to several hundred over the course of other months.But as medicinal cannabis is not legal in Ireland, Ava cannot use the drug, despite it reducing her symptoms on such a dramatic scale.Vera has been campaigning for the past year to have medicinal marijuana legalised in Ireland.A bill that would regulate the use of cannabis for medical purposes was passed to committee stage by the Dáil in December of last year.As well as this, Health Minister Simon Harris announced earlier this month that he would establish a compassionate access programme for cannabis-based treatments for certain conditions.However, Vera has said that she still hasn’t heard from anyone to approve them for the treatment.Speaking to TV3 News, Vera called for the HSE to look at Ava’s case and speed up her access to the treatment.“We have to get help for her now,” Vera said.The HSE said they would look towards Ava’s application for medicinal cannabis as a priority, they’d look at it urgently. But their sense of urgency and our sense of it are not meeting up at all.Vera has met with minister Simon Harris in the past and is due to meet him again on Thursday. She pleaded with officials to speed up Ava’s access to the life-changing medication, saying that time is running out for her daughter.“When she goes into a seizure you don’t know what way she’s going to be when she comes out,” she said.Her life is on the line. It really, really is. Every time.Read: “If we don’t get the legislation, we mightn’t have Ava for much longer”: A mother’s 150-mile protestRead: ‘It’s like getting to know a new part of our daughter’: Cannabis bill passes first stage Mother releases harrowing video of daughter suffering seizures in bid to access medication Vera Twomey is calling for her daughter to be given access to potentially life-changing medication. 46 Comments http://jrnl.ie/3251456 By Cormac Fitzgerald 23,744 Views Feb 21st 2017, 6:57 PM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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first_img Short URL Tuesday 21 Feb 2017, 6:57 PM Share510 Tweet Email WARNING. Some viewers may find the below clip distressing. Source: TheJournal.ie/YouTubeA MOTHER HAS released harrowing images of her young daughter suffering from seizures to put pressure on health officials to speed up her access to potentially life-changing medication.Vera Twomey released a video to Tv3 News of her daughter Ava suffering from a severe seizure.Ava suffers from Dravet Syndrome, a debilitating condition which can see her suffer as many as 20 seizures every day.Dravet Syndrome is a rare form of epilepsy that is resistant to drugs. However, Vera says that a form of medicinal marijuana can help her daughter.Ava was on a medication called Charlotte’s Web – a cannabis extract – to help reduce the frequency of her seizures – which it did.Charlotte’s Web contains very little THC – which causes the psychoactive “high” associated with cannabis use.From the time Ava began taking Charlotte’s Web on 2 October until the end of that month, she only had seven seizures. This compared to several hundred over the course of other months.But as medicinal cannabis is not legal in Ireland, Ava cannot use the drug, despite it reducing her symptoms on such a dramatic scale.Vera has been campaigning for the past year to have medicinal marijuana legalised in Ireland.A bill that would regulate the use of cannabis for medical purposes was passed to committee stage by the Dáil in December of last year.As well as this, Health Minister Simon Harris announced earlier this month that he would establish a compassionate access programme for cannabis-based treatments for certain conditions.However, Vera has said that she still hasn’t heard from anyone to approve them for the treatment.Speaking to TV3 News, Vera called for the HSE to look at Ava’s case and speed up her access to the treatment.“We have to get help for her now,” Vera said.The HSE said they would look towards Ava’s application for medicinal cannabis as a priority, they’d look at it urgently. But their sense of urgency and our sense of it are not meeting up at all.Vera has met with minister Simon Harris in the past and is due to meet him again on Thursday. She pleaded with officials to speed up Ava’s access to the life-changing medication, saying that time is running out for her daughter.“When she goes into a seizure you don’t know what way she’s going to be when she comes out,” she said.Her life is on the line. It really, really is. Every time.Read: “If we don’t get the legislation, we mightn’t have Ava for much longer”: A mother’s 150-mile protestRead: ‘It’s like getting to know a new part of our daughter’: Cannabis bill passes first stage Mother releases harrowing video of daughter suffering seizures in bid to access medication Vera Twomey is calling for her daughter to be given access to potentially life-changing medication. 46 Comments http://jrnl.ie/3251456 By Cormac Fitzgerald 23,744 Views Feb 21st 2017, 6:57 PM Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

Ive cried more times over injuries in the last number of years

first_img 4 Comments Sunday 29 Jan 2017, 9:37 PM Untouchable Glanmire make it four-in-a-row as National Cup is Cork-bound again Source: Photosport/Anthony Au-Yeu/INPHOAnd then the rethink.“I think if I was to do it right now, I wouldn’t be content. I think I would look back with regrets and I remember talking to my Mum and Dad and they told me if I wasn’t 100% sure or had any doubts over retiring, don’t do it.”Despite everything that has happened, and everything Barr has gone through, the fire still burns. There is still a hunger and determination to overcome the injuries that have threatened to overshadow a career which promised so much. This is not how she is meant to bow out.“There is something there niggling away and that will continue to niggle away. The reason you start is because you enjoy it and love it but if that’s gone what else is keeping you there? I didn’t have competitions or racing to keep me going so I was really training for the sake of it.“But what has kept me going over the last few years is glimpses of potential. I’ve always been the athlete with potential but never saw it. I do think there is still potential there but I really have to dig deep and find it at the moment. It’s buried in of all those years of injuries.“I do feel I look back on my career and think what could have been. Even the years I was injured, I wonder was there something I could have done differently. I’m very bad at looking back and thinking what could have been. I don’t want that and that’s why I’m glad I didn’t quit because I would have regrets.”At the moment, it’s baby steps — but steady progress is better than none at all.Barr is back enjoying training again and there is a clear goal at the end of it all; to get back racing this summer in one last bid to save her career. 2017 is, unfortunately, make-or-break and Barr recognises that herself. She’s the first to admit it. Source: Dan Sheridan/INPHO“My motivation was at an all-time low but it’s getting there again. I’ve always concentrated on the end result and forgot to enjoy the process or experience. I’m starting to do that again and hopefully that will bring the desired result.“I’ve been kind of tipping away and when this calf flared up again, I was like for ‘God’s sake’ because I thought I was starting to make progress. My target is May but at the moment I don’t know how it will go. Will I get back racing? I don’t know. I’m taking it session by session because that’s all I can do.“For six weeks I had quit and I was at peace with that so I’m just happy to be back training and enjoying it but I think this will be a make-or-break year. For me it’s the enjoyment and that’s been the biggest thing. I have to enjoy it.“I’ll see how this summer goes. If I had another summer of injuries again it will be very, very hard to pick myself back up.”Unfortunately it’s the reality of the situation, and Barr has always been fully aware of it. A lot of that comes down to the fact she has a Masters in Sports Performance and is currently doing a Phd in Sports Psychology. While athletics is her first love, there is no desperate attempt to hang on in fear of having nothing else to turn to.Her work with Sky Sports as an athlete ambassador has also given her a fresh perspective or, more importantly, a greater appreciation of sport and what she is lucky enough to do for a living.“I do a lot of work in schools and that nearly reinforces your motivation because you’re talking to all these kids about how great sport is,” she says. “And you realise it is great and think ‘what am I talking about, why am I being so down about it?’ Source: Morgan Treacy/INPHO“And this Sky programme has probably helped me as much as I’ve helped any kids because every time I go in, I remind myself why I’m doing it. Sometimes when you’ve been injured for so long you forget why you’re doing it.“I’m finding ways to get my motivation back but at this stage now my aims are now very different. I’ve always been looking to World Championships and forgetting about the process and getting there. Now it’s just about running, plain and simple.“Working with these kids gives me a distraction and I don’t just have to think about myself and injuries. It means nothing to them and that helps a lot. You leave all your problems and it reminds you of when you were starting off and being exciting about sport.“Actually going into schools and saying I was retired would have hurt. It would have hurt a lot because I’m only 27. They would ask questions and wonder so I feel I still have more to give in athletics and that’s kind of what’s keeping me in it.“As hard as that summer [just gone] was, I’ve had to let it go because I can’t keep holding onto it because it makes me angry. I have to keep looking forward. I’m going to keep going and if I feel during the summer that it’s just not there anymore then I’ll probably be happy to [retire]. But I do feel there is something more to give.“I have been forgotten about so there’s no pressure anymore. I can go under the radar and just go out and run. Any race will be progress but at the same time I am still competitive. That’s what is keeping me going anyway.”One step at a time, Barr is working her way back. Let’s hope this next Olympic cycle will bring her more luck and we’ll see the Barrs — Jessie and Thomas — wearing the Irish vest for years to come yet.“I would love that, it would mean a lot to get back. All I can do is try my best and we’ll see what happens.”The42 is on Instagram! Tap the button below on your phone to follow us! IT WASN’T SO long ago when Jessie Barr was considered one of Ireland’s brightest athletes. A young 400 metre hurdler with a prodigious future. Jessie, not her brother Thomas. A genuine talent, potential which knew no bounds.Five years ago, she burst onto the scene with a fifth-place finish at the U23 European Championships. Then, there were finals at the World University Games and, 12 months later, the European Championships in Helsinki. The potential had developed into real promise.There was the 2012 Olympics, too. Having just missed out on the qualification time for her individual event, Barr was part of the Irish relay team in London. It was naturally disappointing not to compete in her main event but at 23, it was only meant to be the start for Barr. A good learning curve. It was expected, not hoped, that it would be the first of many Games.Rio was an altogether different experience. Barr watched every second of the most recent Olympics from afar, and hated it; that’s even allowing for the remarkable performance of Thomas as he came within touching distance of Olympic bronze. His near miss may have been agonising but back home, Jessie was going through her own torment.“All I wanted was for both of us to be on the plane to Rio,” she tells The42. “Mum and Dad were looking for places to stay and were going to be booking and I just told them not to plan anything around me. I’ve learned not to.“It was awful, I’m not even going to lie. I hated Rio. I watched everything and hated it. I loved talking about Thomas and his achievement but part of me, there was this little thing in the back of my head thinking I wanted to be over there, I wanted this for me too. Source: Dan Sheridan/INPHO“It’s a selfish thing but athletes are selfish. I’m absolutely delighted for him, he deserves everything he’s getting but I want that as well. I would never want what he has, I would never want to take that from him but I want it for me as well. I felt hard done by.”To put it mildly, the last Olympic cycle was a difficult one for the Waterford native. It was an injury-plagued one and four years filled with endless frustration and discouragement.A stress fracture to a toe, two Achilles tendon injuries and calf problems. It has been non-stop for Barr and after Rio she questioned her future and wondered whether it was all worth it anymore. 2014, 2015 and 2016 were effectively write-offs and this is the fifth January in a row Barr has been battling injury.Naturally, the flame began to flicker and that threat of optimism threatened to snap. Rio may just have been one setback too far. She had gone from being in peak physical condition and on the verge of a major breakthrough to the athlete whose potential had expired.“I feel like I’m in a constant circle of injury recovery and trying to get back fit,” Barr continues. “I spend more time on a Watt bike or in the pool than I do actually running.“I’ve had so many minor injuries that I’d say I’d have to go back and look through my diary to remember them all. I’ve had little niggly injuries. I was never set back with a long injury which had me out for say six months but it was maybe two months and then a setback.“Always one step forward, two steps back, two steps forward, three steps back. I never really got to push on and that’s what I hope for this year. Just a good stretch and consistency in training.”Barr continues to battle a minor calf problem she sustained earlier this month but, thankfully, it’s nothing significant and she hopes to be back racing when spring rolls into summer. That’s the plan, anyway. Source: Cathal Noonan/INPHOIn so many ways, it could have been a lot different. Before Christmas, Barr had convinced herself she had fallen out of love with the sport. It wasn’t what she wanted to do anymore and she essentially hung up her spikes and was at peace with her decision.“2016 was a disaster,” the 27-year-old explains. “I had entered the year all guns blazing having worked my way back. I raced competitively for the first time in a few years at a local event in Belfast in May. The week after I was involved in a car crash. It was my fault as I went into the back of someone but I ended up in a boot with a foot injury.“It was made worse by the fact all the injuries had no timeline for a return. With an Achilles tendon it’s just until the pain subsides. One day it might be fine and you go and train and the next you’re in agony. And it was just a case of going on a week-to-week basis. I’d be crossing races off my calendar because I just wasn’t ready.“I did find it tough to pick myself back up for the monotony of training when all I do is train and never get to race. I do it for the racing because I don’t enjoy the training enough to keep me going.“After Rio I came back in September and started doing my own stuff and then I went back to the [training] group. I just wasn’t enjoying it. I was going to training and doing the same thing everyday and I just didn’t want to be there. I’ve never had those feelings.“I remember one day I was doing something boring, think it was taxes, and I’m not funded anymore. I knew without Sky Sports [ambassador] I actually don’t have an income and I’m a student as well so I’ve a lot of outgoings and not a lot coming in. Why am I doing athletics, what has it done for me over the last three years?“All athletics has done has made me cry, it hasn’t given me anything good, I’ve given so much to it and I haven’t got anything back. Maybe it’s time I quit and it was the first time I’ve ever thought it. I’m only 27 and I always thought I’d go onto Tokyo and that was a given. It kind of dawned on me, maybe I do need to just quit because it hadn’t given me much enjoyment. I’ve cried more times over injuries in the last number of years than anything else.”And the decision was made.“I was living a normal life,” she adds. “College got very busy and it worked out well because I had a lot of work to do but then when it went back to normal, I started to miss it.” Image: Cathal Noonan/INPHO http://the42.ie/3203091 Share548 Tweet Email1 Jan 29th 2017, 9:37 PM Short URL Follow us: the42.ie 27,997 Views Barr in action at the World University Games, Kazan 2013. By Ryan Bailey ‘I’ve cried more times over injuries in the last number of years than anything else’ Jessie Barr has seen her promising career interrupted by a succession of injuries but she’s hoping to return in 2017. Barr in action at the World University Games, Kazan 2013. Image: Cathal Noonan/INPHO Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

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first_img 4 Comments Sunday 29 Jan 2017, 9:37 PM Untouchable Glanmire make it four-in-a-row as National Cup is Cork-bound again Source: Photosport/Anthony Au-Yeu/INPHOAnd then the rethink.“I think if I was to do it right now, I wouldn’t be content. I think I would look back with regrets and I remember talking to my Mum and Dad and they told me if I wasn’t 100% sure or had any doubts over retiring, don’t do it.”Despite everything that has happened, and everything Barr has gone through, the fire still burns. There is still a hunger and determination to overcome the injuries that have threatened to overshadow a career which promised so much. This is not how she is meant to bow out.“There is something there niggling away and that will continue to niggle away. The reason you start is because you enjoy it and love it but if that’s gone what else is keeping you there? I didn’t have competitions or racing to keep me going so I was really training for the sake of it.“But what has kept me going over the last few years is glimpses of potential. I’ve always been the athlete with potential but never saw it. I do think there is still potential there but I really have to dig deep and find it at the moment. It’s buried in of all those years of injuries.“I do feel I look back on my career and think what could have been. Even the years I was injured, I wonder was there something I could have done differently. I’m very bad at looking back and thinking what could have been. I don’t want that and that’s why I’m glad I didn’t quit because I would have regrets.”At the moment, it’s baby steps — but steady progress is better than none at all.Barr is back enjoying training again and there is a clear goal at the end of it all; to get back racing this summer in one last bid to save her career. 2017 is, unfortunately, make-or-break and Barr recognises that herself. She’s the first to admit it. Source: Dan Sheridan/INPHO“My motivation was at an all-time low but it’s getting there again. I’ve always concentrated on the end result and forgot to enjoy the process or experience. I’m starting to do that again and hopefully that will bring the desired result.“I’ve been kind of tipping away and when this calf flared up again, I was like for ‘God’s sake’ because I thought I was starting to make progress. My target is May but at the moment I don’t know how it will go. Will I get back racing? I don’t know. I’m taking it session by session because that’s all I can do.“For six weeks I had quit and I was at peace with that so I’m just happy to be back training and enjoying it but I think this will be a make-or-break year. For me it’s the enjoyment and that’s been the biggest thing. I have to enjoy it.“I’ll see how this summer goes. If I had another summer of injuries again it will be very, very hard to pick myself back up.”Unfortunately it’s the reality of the situation, and Barr has always been fully aware of it. A lot of that comes down to the fact she has a Masters in Sports Performance and is currently doing a Phd in Sports Psychology. While athletics is her first love, there is no desperate attempt to hang on in fear of having nothing else to turn to.Her work with Sky Sports as an athlete ambassador has also given her a fresh perspective or, more importantly, a greater appreciation of sport and what she is lucky enough to do for a living.“I do a lot of work in schools and that nearly reinforces your motivation because you’re talking to all these kids about how great sport is,” she says. “And you realise it is great and think ‘what am I talking about, why am I being so down about it?’ Source: Morgan Treacy/INPHO“And this Sky programme has probably helped me as much as I’ve helped any kids because every time I go in, I remind myself why I’m doing it. Sometimes when you’ve been injured for so long you forget why you’re doing it.“I’m finding ways to get my motivation back but at this stage now my aims are now very different. I’ve always been looking to World Championships and forgetting about the process and getting there. Now it’s just about running, plain and simple.“Working with these kids gives me a distraction and I don’t just have to think about myself and injuries. It means nothing to them and that helps a lot. You leave all your problems and it reminds you of when you were starting off and being exciting about sport.“Actually going into schools and saying I was retired would have hurt. It would have hurt a lot because I’m only 27. They would ask questions and wonder so I feel I still have more to give in athletics and that’s kind of what’s keeping me in it.“As hard as that summer [just gone] was, I’ve had to let it go because I can’t keep holding onto it because it makes me angry. I have to keep looking forward. I’m going to keep going and if I feel during the summer that it’s just not there anymore then I’ll probably be happy to [retire]. But I do feel there is something more to give.“I have been forgotten about so there’s no pressure anymore. I can go under the radar and just go out and run. Any race will be progress but at the same time I am still competitive. That’s what is keeping me going anyway.”One step at a time, Barr is working her way back. Let’s hope this next Olympic cycle will bring her more luck and we’ll see the Barrs — Jessie and Thomas — wearing the Irish vest for years to come yet.“I would love that, it would mean a lot to get back. All I can do is try my best and we’ll see what happens.”The42 is on Instagram! Tap the button below on your phone to follow us! IT WASN’T SO long ago when Jessie Barr was considered one of Ireland’s brightest athletes. A young 400 metre hurdler with a prodigious future. Jessie, not her brother Thomas. A genuine talent, potential which knew no bounds.Five years ago, she burst onto the scene with a fifth-place finish at the U23 European Championships. Then, there were finals at the World University Games and, 12 months later, the European Championships in Helsinki. The potential had developed into real promise.There was the 2012 Olympics, too. Having just missed out on the qualification time for her individual event, Barr was part of the Irish relay team in London. It was naturally disappointing not to compete in her main event but at 23, it was only meant to be the start for Barr. A good learning curve. It was expected, not hoped, that it would be the first of many Games.Rio was an altogether different experience. Barr watched every second of the most recent Olympics from afar, and hated it; that’s even allowing for the remarkable performance of Thomas as he came within touching distance of Olympic bronze. His near miss may have been agonising but back home, Jessie was going through her own torment.“All I wanted was for both of us to be on the plane to Rio,” she tells The42. “Mum and Dad were looking for places to stay and were going to be booking and I just told them not to plan anything around me. I’ve learned not to.“It was awful, I’m not even going to lie. I hated Rio. I watched everything and hated it. I loved talking about Thomas and his achievement but part of me, there was this little thing in the back of my head thinking I wanted to be over there, I wanted this for me too. Source: Dan Sheridan/INPHO“It’s a selfish thing but athletes are selfish. I’m absolutely delighted for him, he deserves everything he’s getting but I want that as well. I would never want what he has, I would never want to take that from him but I want it for me as well. I felt hard done by.”To put it mildly, the last Olympic cycle was a difficult one for the Waterford native. It was an injury-plagued one and four years filled with endless frustration and discouragement.A stress fracture to a toe, two Achilles tendon injuries and calf problems. It has been non-stop for Barr and after Rio she questioned her future and wondered whether it was all worth it anymore. 2014, 2015 and 2016 were effectively write-offs and this is the fifth January in a row Barr has been battling injury.Naturally, the flame began to flicker and that threat of optimism threatened to snap. Rio may just have been one setback too far. She had gone from being in peak physical condition and on the verge of a major breakthrough to the athlete whose potential had expired.“I feel like I’m in a constant circle of injury recovery and trying to get back fit,” Barr continues. “I spend more time on a Watt bike or in the pool than I do actually running.“I’ve had so many minor injuries that I’d say I’d have to go back and look through my diary to remember them all. I’ve had little niggly injuries. I was never set back with a long injury which had me out for say six months but it was maybe two months and then a setback.“Always one step forward, two steps back, two steps forward, three steps back. I never really got to push on and that’s what I hope for this year. Just a good stretch and consistency in training.”Barr continues to battle a minor calf problem she sustained earlier this month but, thankfully, it’s nothing significant and she hopes to be back racing when spring rolls into summer. That’s the plan, anyway. Source: Cathal Noonan/INPHOIn so many ways, it could have been a lot different. Before Christmas, Barr had convinced herself she had fallen out of love with the sport. It wasn’t what she wanted to do anymore and she essentially hung up her spikes and was at peace with her decision.“2016 was a disaster,” the 27-year-old explains. “I had entered the year all guns blazing having worked my way back. I raced competitively for the first time in a few years at a local event in Belfast in May. The week after I was involved in a car crash. It was my fault as I went into the back of someone but I ended up in a boot with a foot injury.“It was made worse by the fact all the injuries had no timeline for a return. With an Achilles tendon it’s just until the pain subsides. One day it might be fine and you go and train and the next you’re in agony. And it was just a case of going on a week-to-week basis. I’d be crossing races off my calendar because I just wasn’t ready.“I did find it tough to pick myself back up for the monotony of training when all I do is train and never get to race. I do it for the racing because I don’t enjoy the training enough to keep me going.“After Rio I came back in September and started doing my own stuff and then I went back to the [training] group. I just wasn’t enjoying it. I was going to training and doing the same thing everyday and I just didn’t want to be there. I’ve never had those feelings.“I remember one day I was doing something boring, think it was taxes, and I’m not funded anymore. I knew without Sky Sports [ambassador] I actually don’t have an income and I’m a student as well so I’ve a lot of outgoings and not a lot coming in. Why am I doing athletics, what has it done for me over the last three years?“All athletics has done has made me cry, it hasn’t given me anything good, I’ve given so much to it and I haven’t got anything back. Maybe it’s time I quit and it was the first time I’ve ever thought it. I’m only 27 and I always thought I’d go onto Tokyo and that was a given. It kind of dawned on me, maybe I do need to just quit because it hadn’t given me much enjoyment. I’ve cried more times over injuries in the last number of years than anything else.”And the decision was made.“I was living a normal life,” she adds. “College got very busy and it worked out well because I had a lot of work to do but then when it went back to normal, I started to miss it.” Image: Cathal Noonan/INPHO http://the42.ie/3203091 Share548 Tweet Email1 Jan 29th 2017, 9:37 PM Short URL Follow us: the42.ie 27,997 Views Barr in action at the World University Games, Kazan 2013. By Ryan Bailey ‘I’ve cried more times over injuries in the last number of years than anything else’ Jessie Barr has seen her promising career interrupted by a succession of injuries but she’s hoping to return in 2017. Barr in action at the World University Games, Kazan 2013. Image: Cathal Noonan/INPHO Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

Australian Hellenes honour Anders Lassen – the Achilles of Thessaloniki

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram This week saw Melbourne’s Greek community join with local Danes to commemorate the key role played by Major Anders Lassen in the liberation of Thessaloniki 73 years ago last month, in October 1944. This is the first time since 1944 that Hellenes in Melbourne – and possibly the world – have joined with Danes to celebrate and commemorate Anders Lassen.The event was held at Melbourne’s impressive Royal Danish Consulate General Denmark House, and was hosted by the Danish Honorary Consul-General in Melbourne, Jan Ravnholt who acted as master of ceremonies for the night. It was attended by over 100 people, including diplomatic, political, RSL and other community representatives. Also attending were Judith Gunnarson and Deb Stewart, both descendents of Sister Evelyn Hutt who served on Lemnos in 1915. Judith also spent a major part of her life in Scandinavia. The event blended Danish and Hellenic hospitality, with traditional Greek music from the Melbourniotes band welcoming attendees to the consulate.The highlight of the event was the attendance of Mr Tom Nørring, Danish Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Australia, and his wife Claudia, a native of Thessaloniki herself, who came to Melbourne especially for the event. Also in attendance was Maria Gidarakos, representing the Greek Consul-General in Melbourne.The event was organised by myself, Melbourne’s Thessaloniki Association ‘The White Tower’, and the Battle of Crete and Greece Commemorative Council, along with Melbourne’s Danish Consulate, both as part of the annual Melbourne-Thessaloniki Sister-City celebrations and the annual program of events commemorating the Battle of Crete and Greece in the Second World War.The story of Anders Lassen and his role in Greece and Thessaloniki is not so well known amongst Hellenes or Australians. This commemoration was held to increase awareness of this important part of Hellenic history.Major Anders Lassen was 24 years old when he led the liberation of Thessaloniki in October 1944. Originally tasked to observe the German situation in the city, Anders decided to engage the German occupiers and force their surrender or expulsion before they completed their planned destruction of the city’s infrastructure. On 29 October Anders led his 40-man special forces team, including Lieutenant Mavrikis and members of the Greek Sacred Squadron, along with members of the local ELAS resistance, in an assault on the German occupation of the city. After much fighting, the remaining Germans abandoned the city the next morning. Thessaloniki was free.Anders LassenAnders also took an active part in the Allied raiding parties which harassed the Axis occupation of many Aegean Islands throughout 1942 and 1943. He led successful raids on Crete, Symi, and Santorini to name a few. On Crete he was guided to his targets and hidden during his escape by the local resistance. His bravery under fire saw the Cretans name him Spiro.His loyalty to his men was legend. But this also extended to those who bravely helped them. After the capture of Samos in 1943, Anders organised the evacuation of many local civilians to safety as the Germans returned to occupy the island. He left notes for the Germans,threatening them with retribution if they carried out reprisals against the local population. And he famously returned to Symi to avenge the murder by the Italian garrison of a local priest and his son who had helped the Allies.Noted for his bravery, Anders was a striking figure. Tall, blond and blue-eyed, he always impressed his fellow soldiers with his fitness and leadership skills. He appears to have had a magnetic personality, one of his commanders wrote that he was “irresistible” and “exuding Viking charm.” When in charge of any operation he always led by example. Since the occupation of Denmark by the Germans in 1940, Anders had been eager to engage the enemy personally. He often seemed to act without fear, some considered that he was chasing death. One comrade said that serving with Anders was like serving with Achilles! Prior to his service in Greece, Anders took part in raids on West Africa and the Channel Islands. After Greece he served in northern Italy, where he was killed leading his men against a German position, the defenders shot Anders after they’d sought surrender. He was 24 years old.His personal qualities saw him promoted in the field from private to major in just five years. He was awarded three Military Crosses as well as numerous other medals – including the Victoria Cross, the highest award for gallantry awaarded in the Commonwealth. Sadly this was earned posthumously. Anders has the distinction of being the only Special Air Service soldier and the only non-Commonwealth soldier to have been awarded the Victoria Cross in WWII.At the commemoration Ross Alatsas, deputy chair of the Victorian Multicultural Commission, spoke of Anders as defender of all we hold dear: a society that welcomes diversity, and of his own personal connection to Anders through their common Greek name Spiros. Bill Papastergiadis, Greek Community of Melbourne and Victoria president welcomed this collaboration between the two communities. Iakovos Garivaldis’, OAM, vice-president of the Thessaloniki Association ‘The White Tower’ address met with a warm response as it was in the form of a direct thank you addressed to Anders himself.Anders Lassen memorial, Copenhagen, Denmark.The highlight of the event was the presentation to the Danish Consulate of a memorial plaque dedicated to Anders Lassen and the liberation of Thessaloniki by Paul Mavroudis, OAM ‘The White Tower’ president and Tony Tsourdoulakis, secretary of the Battle of Crete and Greece Commemorative Council. Mr Tsourdalakis said that it was an honour for the council to be able to take part in this important event, and said that Anders Lassen played an important role in the fight to liberate Greece from Axis occupation.Mr Mavroudis acknowledged that this was an important day for the Thessaloniki Association and all Hellenes in Melbourne. He added that there was no better way to celebrate Melbourne’s sister city relationship with Thessaloniki than by coming together at the Danish Consulate in Melbourne to honour Anders and the liberation of Thessaloniki.In accepting the memorial plaque, Mr Nørring said that he was a personal friend of Thomas Harder, the author of a major Danish biography of Anders. He echoed the words of Mr Alatsas that the world that Anders’ gave his life for was one of tolerance and diversity, one that we in Australia, Denmark, and Greece are able to enjoy. He congratulated the local Hellenic community in taking this important step to create a permanent marker honouring Anders and his role in liberating Thessaloniki in 1944.Mr Ravnholt said that the plaque would be displayed at Denmark House and hoped there would be further collaborations between the Greek and Danish communities in Australia. He looked forward to attending the coming annual Thessaloniki-Melbourne sister city celebrations to be held at Federation Square later this month.* Jim Claven is a trained historian and freelance writer. The most recent biography of Anders has been written by Danish historian Thomas Harder in Danish. Jim and Thomas are keen to hear from anyone in the community with personal experience or family memories of Anders Lassen and his role in the liberation of Greece. Contact Jim by email at jimclaven@yahoo.com.au.last_img read more

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first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram This week saw Melbourne’s Greek community join with local Danes to commemorate the key role played by Major Anders Lassen in the liberation of Thessaloniki 73 years ago last month, in October 1944. This is the first time since 1944 that Hellenes in Melbourne – and possibly the world – have joined with Danes to celebrate and commemorate Anders Lassen.The event was held at Melbourne’s impressive Royal Danish Consulate General Denmark House, and was hosted by the Danish Honorary Consul-General in Melbourne, Jan Ravnholt who acted as master of ceremonies for the night. It was attended by over 100 people, including diplomatic, political, RSL and other community representatives. Also attending were Judith Gunnarson and Deb Stewart, both descendents of Sister Evelyn Hutt who served on Lemnos in 1915. Judith also spent a major part of her life in Scandinavia. The event blended Danish and Hellenic hospitality, with traditional Greek music from the Melbourniotes band welcoming attendees to the consulate.The highlight of the event was the attendance of Mr Tom Nørring, Danish Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Australia, and his wife Claudia, a native of Thessaloniki herself, who came to Melbourne especially for the event. Also in attendance was Maria Gidarakos, representing the Greek Consul-General in Melbourne.The event was organised by myself, Melbourne’s Thessaloniki Association ‘The White Tower’, and the Battle of Crete and Greece Commemorative Council, along with Melbourne’s Danish Consulate, both as part of the annual Melbourne-Thessaloniki Sister-City celebrations and the annual program of events commemorating the Battle of Crete and Greece in the Second World War.The story of Anders Lassen and his role in Greece and Thessaloniki is not so well known amongst Hellenes or Australians. This commemoration was held to increase awareness of this important part of Hellenic history.Major Anders Lassen was 24 years old when he led the liberation of Thessaloniki in October 1944. Originally tasked to observe the German situation in the city, Anders decided to engage the German occupiers and force their surrender or expulsion before they completed their planned destruction of the city’s infrastructure. On 29 October Anders led his 40-man special forces team, including Lieutenant Mavrikis and members of the Greek Sacred Squadron, along with members of the local ELAS resistance, in an assault on the German occupation of the city. After much fighting, the remaining Germans abandoned the city the next morning. Thessaloniki was free.Anders LassenAnders also took an active part in the Allied raiding parties which harassed the Axis occupation of many Aegean Islands throughout 1942 and 1943. He led successful raids on Crete, Symi, and Santorini to name a few. On Crete he was guided to his targets and hidden during his escape by the local resistance. His bravery under fire saw the Cretans name him Spiro.His loyalty to his men was legend. But this also extended to those who bravely helped them. After the capture of Samos in 1943, Anders organised the evacuation of many local civilians to safety as the Germans returned to occupy the island. He left notes for the Germans,threatening them with retribution if they carried out reprisals against the local population. And he famously returned to Symi to avenge the murder by the Italian garrison of a local priest and his son who had helped the Allies.Noted for his bravery, Anders was a striking figure. Tall, blond and blue-eyed, he always impressed his fellow soldiers with his fitness and leadership skills. He appears to have had a magnetic personality, one of his commanders wrote that he was “irresistible” and “exuding Viking charm.” When in charge of any operation he always led by example. Since the occupation of Denmark by the Germans in 1940, Anders had been eager to engage the enemy personally. He often seemed to act without fear, some considered that he was chasing death. One comrade said that serving with Anders was like serving with Achilles! Prior to his service in Greece, Anders took part in raids on West Africa and the Channel Islands. After Greece he served in northern Italy, where he was killed leading his men against a German position, the defenders shot Anders after they’d sought surrender. He was 24 years old.His personal qualities saw him promoted in the field from private to major in just five years. He was awarded three Military Crosses as well as numerous other medals – including the Victoria Cross, the highest award for gallantry awaarded in the Commonwealth. Sadly this was earned posthumously. Anders has the distinction of being the only Special Air Service soldier and the only non-Commonwealth soldier to have been awarded the Victoria Cross in WWII.At the commemoration Ross Alatsas, deputy chair of the Victorian Multicultural Commission, spoke of Anders as defender of all we hold dear: a society that welcomes diversity, and of his own personal connection to Anders through their common Greek name Spiros. Bill Papastergiadis, Greek Community of Melbourne and Victoria president welcomed this collaboration between the two communities. Iakovos Garivaldis’, OAM, vice-president of the Thessaloniki Association ‘The White Tower’ address met with a warm response as it was in the form of a direct thank you addressed to Anders himself.Anders Lassen memorial, Copenhagen, Denmark.The highlight of the event was the presentation to the Danish Consulate of a memorial plaque dedicated to Anders Lassen and the liberation of Thessaloniki by Paul Mavroudis, OAM ‘The White Tower’ president and Tony Tsourdoulakis, secretary of the Battle of Crete and Greece Commemorative Council. Mr Tsourdalakis said that it was an honour for the council to be able to take part in this important event, and said that Anders Lassen played an important role in the fight to liberate Greece from Axis occupation.Mr Mavroudis acknowledged that this was an important day for the Thessaloniki Association and all Hellenes in Melbourne. He added that there was no better way to celebrate Melbourne’s sister city relationship with Thessaloniki than by coming together at the Danish Consulate in Melbourne to honour Anders and the liberation of Thessaloniki.In accepting the memorial plaque, Mr Nørring said that he was a personal friend of Thomas Harder, the author of a major Danish biography of Anders. He echoed the words of Mr Alatsas that the world that Anders’ gave his life for was one of tolerance and diversity, one that we in Australia, Denmark, and Greece are able to enjoy. He congratulated the local Hellenic community in taking this important step to create a permanent marker honouring Anders and his role in liberating Thessaloniki in 1944.Mr Ravnholt said that the plaque would be displayed at Denmark House and hoped there would be further collaborations between the Greek and Danish communities in Australia. He looked forward to attending the coming annual Thessaloniki-Melbourne sister city celebrations to be held at Federation Square later this month.* Jim Claven is a trained historian and freelance writer. The most recent biography of Anders has been written by Danish historian Thomas Harder in Danish. Jim and Thomas are keen to hear from anyone in the community with personal experience or family memories of Anders Lassen and his role in the liberation of Greece. Contact Jim by email at jimclaven@yahoo.com.au.last_img read more

Anonymous piraté par un cheval de Troie

first_imgAnonymous, piraté par un cheval de Troie ?Anonymous aurait vécu l’histoire de “l’arroseur arrosé”. Le collectif de pirates a en effet subi une intrusion via un cheval de Troie lors de ses actions contre la fermeture de Megaupload.La société spécialisée dans les solutions anti-virus Symantec est catégorique: des soutiens au collectif Anonymous, l’organisation luttant contre les atteintes à la liberté sur Internet, se sont faits piratés récemment lors de leurs actions de déni de service de sites web au moment de la fermeture du site Megaupload, indique Génération NT.À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?Les membres d’Anonymous auraient sans le vouloir téléchargé un cheval de Troie, qui s’est ensuite répandu dans leur propre système de blocage de sites Internet, un outil appelé Slowloris. Ce virus s’appelle Zeus et est bien connu des experts en sécurité sur le web. Ce programme a pour but initial de cibler les données bancaires de la machine infectée et de les envoyer par la suite à l’auteur de la fraude de manière transparente pour l’utilisateur.Toujours est-il que les Anonymous, via leur fil Twitter, démentent formellement ces informations, ajoutant que le message de Symantec est “au minimum, faux et diffamatoire”. Ils se défendent d’avoir fait circulé un programme malveillant, chose contraire à leurs principes. Les Anonymous ont un passé compliqué avec Symantec puisque l’un de sympathisants avait dérobé il y a quelques années un bout de code source provenant de leur logiciels de protection Norton.Le 5 mars 2012 à 18:00 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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first_imgAnonymous, piraté par un cheval de Troie ?Anonymous aurait vécu l’histoire de “l’arroseur arrosé”. Le collectif de pirates a en effet subi une intrusion via un cheval de Troie lors de ses actions contre la fermeture de Megaupload.La société spécialisée dans les solutions anti-virus Symantec est catégorique: des soutiens au collectif Anonymous, l’organisation luttant contre les atteintes à la liberté sur Internet, se sont faits piratés récemment lors de leurs actions de déni de service de sites web au moment de la fermeture du site Megaupload, indique Génération NT.À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?Les membres d’Anonymous auraient sans le vouloir téléchargé un cheval de Troie, qui s’est ensuite répandu dans leur propre système de blocage de sites Internet, un outil appelé Slowloris. Ce virus s’appelle Zeus et est bien connu des experts en sécurité sur le web. Ce programme a pour but initial de cibler les données bancaires de la machine infectée et de les envoyer par la suite à l’auteur de la fraude de manière transparente pour l’utilisateur.Toujours est-il que les Anonymous, via leur fil Twitter, démentent formellement ces informations, ajoutant que le message de Symantec est “au minimum, faux et diffamatoire”. Ils se défendent d’avoir fait circulé un programme malveillant, chose contraire à leurs principes. Les Anonymous ont un passé compliqué avec Symantec puisque l’un de sympathisants avait dérobé il y a quelques années un bout de code source provenant de leur logiciels de protection Norton.Le 5 mars 2012 à 18:00 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

NASA Announces BillionDollar Mission Finalists

first_img NASA has been mulling over the latest additions to its mission lineup for quite some time. And there’s a lot on the line this time around — $1 billion in grants and funding, to be precise. The organization has been looking for mission plans that would have a high scientific value and be solid stepping stones for human space exploration moving forward. The two final two bids — a robe to Saturn’s moon, Titan, and another for a comet — were selected just last week.The original field of candidates included a total of 12 project proposals and included destinations from around the system. But, funding is limited, so the painstaking process of narrowing down the ones that would be the most viable and constructive on the agency’s limited budget was a challenge.Dragonfly, one of the two remaining plans, proposes a quadcopter that would be able to cover to land and surveil one of several sites on Titan. Then, it will lift off and continue gathering data as it traverses the moon. The other proposal is for a project dubbed CAESAR. Its purpose is more straightforward — grab a piece of a comet nucleus and return it safely to earth.“I selected these mission concepts based on their outstanding and visionary science,” associate administrator of NASA Thomas Zurbuchen said in a statement.Indeed, both missions have a lot of potential. Titan, for instance, has been identified as among the best spots to search for life in our solar system, especially after a string of recent discoveries thanks to Cassini and other research that’s been done on the moon.Because Titan has a relatively thick atmosphere, too, flying machines might allow for a great breadth of study. Rovers only tend to cover a few hundred or possibly thousand meters during their missions. A quadcopter has a lot more flexibility in selecting its destination — but there’s also a lot more that could go wrong. And that’s especially true when you’re dealing with a communications delay. To counter this, Dragonfly is meant to be at least somewhat autonomous.“Titan is a benign environment. There isn’t a life-limiting aspect of the environment, in that sense which is nice ,” Elizabeth Turtle, Dragonfly’s lead told the Telegraph. “Dragonfly is designed to go back, build on what we’ve learned and answer the fundamental unknowns that remain about Titan.”The fact that it could gather samples from sites that are hundreds of miles apart is also exciting, not to mention that the moon has liquid oceans filled with organic molecules that could form the essential building blocks of life.CAESAR’s tack is a bit different, however. And it seeks to probe how our solar system formed. Comets are uniquely perfect for this as they contain lots of material that has been largely unaltered since the formation of the solar system. To that end, they’re like mobile frozen time capsules.Both projects have until January 2019 to continue preliminary investigation and planning. A decision will be made about which project to fund later that year, with a launch expected sometime around 2025.“This is a giant leap forward in developing our next bold mission of science discovery,” Zurbuchen said. “These are tantalizing investigations that seek to answer some of the biggest questions in our solar system today. We fly only about two of these missions per decade.” Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Stay on targetcenter_img NASA Says 2 Asteroids Will Safely Fly By Earth This WeekendScientists Discover Possible Interstellar Visitor last_img read more

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first_img NASA has been mulling over the latest additions to its mission lineup for quite some time. And there’s a lot on the line this time around — $1 billion in grants and funding, to be precise. The organization has been looking for mission plans that would have a high scientific value and be solid stepping stones for human space exploration moving forward. The two final two bids — a robe to Saturn’s moon, Titan, and another for a comet — were selected just last week.The original field of candidates included a total of 12 project proposals and included destinations from around the system. But, funding is limited, so the painstaking process of narrowing down the ones that would be the most viable and constructive on the agency’s limited budget was a challenge.Dragonfly, one of the two remaining plans, proposes a quadcopter that would be able to cover to land and surveil one of several sites on Titan. Then, it will lift off and continue gathering data as it traverses the moon. The other proposal is for a project dubbed CAESAR. Its purpose is more straightforward — grab a piece of a comet nucleus and return it safely to earth.“I selected these mission concepts based on their outstanding and visionary science,” associate administrator of NASA Thomas Zurbuchen said in a statement.Indeed, both missions have a lot of potential. Titan, for instance, has been identified as among the best spots to search for life in our solar system, especially after a string of recent discoveries thanks to Cassini and other research that’s been done on the moon.Because Titan has a relatively thick atmosphere, too, flying machines might allow for a great breadth of study. Rovers only tend to cover a few hundred or possibly thousand meters during their missions. A quadcopter has a lot more flexibility in selecting its destination — but there’s also a lot more that could go wrong. And that’s especially true when you’re dealing with a communications delay. To counter this, Dragonfly is meant to be at least somewhat autonomous.“Titan is a benign environment. There isn’t a life-limiting aspect of the environment, in that sense which is nice ,” Elizabeth Turtle, Dragonfly’s lead told the Telegraph. “Dragonfly is designed to go back, build on what we’ve learned and answer the fundamental unknowns that remain about Titan.”The fact that it could gather samples from sites that are hundreds of miles apart is also exciting, not to mention that the moon has liquid oceans filled with organic molecules that could form the essential building blocks of life.CAESAR’s tack is a bit different, however. And it seeks to probe how our solar system formed. Comets are uniquely perfect for this as they contain lots of material that has been largely unaltered since the formation of the solar system. To that end, they’re like mobile frozen time capsules.Both projects have until January 2019 to continue preliminary investigation and planning. A decision will be made about which project to fund later that year, with a launch expected sometime around 2025.“This is a giant leap forward in developing our next bold mission of science discovery,” Zurbuchen said. “These are tantalizing investigations that seek to answer some of the biggest questions in our solar system today. We fly only about two of these missions per decade.” Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey. Stay on targetcenter_img NASA Says 2 Asteroids Will Safely Fly By Earth This WeekendScientists Discover Possible Interstellar Visitor last_img read more

This digital converter sounds so good it might convert LPloving audiophiles

first_imgThe Denafrips Ares digital converter Pacula I love analog audio, but I’ve never complained that digital audio sounded unpleasant or bright, just a little boring, and it doesn’t pull me in like a decent turntable. Music on LP connects better, and to my delight that’s what’s happened with the Denafrips Ares digital converter. Digital sounded a few steps closer to vinyl, and if that translates as more “analog-like,” so be it. With the Ares I heard everything deep down into the mix, like never before. The Ares is competitively priced at $680, £550 and AU$980 but what makes it unusual is that it uses a bank of resistors to perform the digital-to-analog conversion.The sound is big, but Ares is nice and compact, just 2.4 by 8.4 by 9.9 inches (45 by 215 by 230 mm). The front panel has a large Standby button, then a row of much smaller digital input selector buttons for USB, coaxial and optical digital inputs, plus Phase and Mute buttons. A series of incredibly tiny and not-at-all-bright red LEDs indicate the selected source, the sample rate and whether the converter is playing DSD files. No remote is included. Judged from the outside it’s a smartly designed, but no-frills basic black component, but I popped the cover and took a gander at what the Denafrips engineers crafted. The Ares doesn’t use an off-the-shelf digital converter chip like most converters do. The Ares innards instead house a Denafrips designed discrete, high-precision resistor ladder (R-2R) digital converter. I’ve never before seen one like that in a less than $2,000 converter. Ares decodes high-resolution PCM files up to 24 bit/384 kHz sampling rates, and up to 11.288MHz (4X) DSD native files. The internal power supply boasts a large custom-wound toroidal transformer and a bank of 72 small capacitors. denafrips-aresInside the Denafrips Ares digital converter  Denafrips The rear end has a USB, two coaxial RCA and two optical digital input jacks; and stereo RCA and XLR analog output jacks. The bottom panel has four rubber-tipped conical feet, and a slide switch to select 115- or 230-volt operation. Build quality feels robust, and the warranty runs three years. Listening to the AresThe Ares sound wasn’t anything like any other digital converter I’ve tried at home; it had more body and dimensionality, and the sound broke free of my Klipsch Forte III speakers. The music had more guts and power, sounding a lot more like LPs, or to put it another way, the sound of live music.To put the Ares in context I brought out a Schiit Bifrost Multibit converter ($599), which sounded brighter and crisper, but more uptight, and dimensionally flatter than the Ares. With the Ares the sound opened up, it was effortless, the Ares let the music come through with greater ease. It was a bigger sound, with more soundstage depth, and low level, quieter, more subtle detailing was enhanced. This kind of resolution was unprecedented for the money. Next, I brought out a Border Patrol SE tube digital converter ($1,350, £1,046 and AU$1,804). I love it for its sweet sound and soundstage depth, but the Ares’ purity and superior clarity was in another league. The music popped into focus, as if veils had been lifted. The Border Patrol SE sound was gorgeous, but it sounded a tad sluggish after I spent some time with the Ares. Though I try to avoid using the term “musical” to describe the sound of components, that’s exactly what made the Ares special. There was a live quality to the sound, more bounce to the rhythms, more visceral impact in the bass. I was shaken by this little converter, the entry-level model from Denafrips. I hope to get my hands on one of its higher-end models in the coming months. Vinshine Audio is the global distributor for Denafrips; all products are direct shipped from Guangzhou, China, to each customer. The Ares current price is $680 in the US, £550 in the UK and AU$980 in Australia. Share your voice Comments The Audiophiliac Audio Home Entertainment 6 Tagslast_img read more

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first_imgThe Denafrips Ares digital converter Pacula I love analog audio, but I’ve never complained that digital audio sounded unpleasant or bright, just a little boring, and it doesn’t pull me in like a decent turntable. Music on LP connects better, and to my delight that’s what’s happened with the Denafrips Ares digital converter. Digital sounded a few steps closer to vinyl, and if that translates as more “analog-like,” so be it. With the Ares I heard everything deep down into the mix, like never before. The Ares is competitively priced at $680, £550 and AU$980 but what makes it unusual is that it uses a bank of resistors to perform the digital-to-analog conversion.The sound is big, but Ares is nice and compact, just 2.4 by 8.4 by 9.9 inches (45 by 215 by 230 mm). The front panel has a large Standby button, then a row of much smaller digital input selector buttons for USB, coaxial and optical digital inputs, plus Phase and Mute buttons. A series of incredibly tiny and not-at-all-bright red LEDs indicate the selected source, the sample rate and whether the converter is playing DSD files. No remote is included. Judged from the outside it’s a smartly designed, but no-frills basic black component, but I popped the cover and took a gander at what the Denafrips engineers crafted. The Ares doesn’t use an off-the-shelf digital converter chip like most converters do. The Ares innards instead house a Denafrips designed discrete, high-precision resistor ladder (R-2R) digital converter. I’ve never before seen one like that in a less than $2,000 converter. Ares decodes high-resolution PCM files up to 24 bit/384 kHz sampling rates, and up to 11.288MHz (4X) DSD native files. The internal power supply boasts a large custom-wound toroidal transformer and a bank of 72 small capacitors. denafrips-aresInside the Denafrips Ares digital converter  Denafrips The rear end has a USB, two coaxial RCA and two optical digital input jacks; and stereo RCA and XLR analog output jacks. The bottom panel has four rubber-tipped conical feet, and a slide switch to select 115- or 230-volt operation. Build quality feels robust, and the warranty runs three years. Listening to the AresThe Ares sound wasn’t anything like any other digital converter I’ve tried at home; it had more body and dimensionality, and the sound broke free of my Klipsch Forte III speakers. The music had more guts and power, sounding a lot more like LPs, or to put it another way, the sound of live music.To put the Ares in context I brought out a Schiit Bifrost Multibit converter ($599), which sounded brighter and crisper, but more uptight, and dimensionally flatter than the Ares. With the Ares the sound opened up, it was effortless, the Ares let the music come through with greater ease. It was a bigger sound, with more soundstage depth, and low level, quieter, more subtle detailing was enhanced. This kind of resolution was unprecedented for the money. Next, I brought out a Border Patrol SE tube digital converter ($1,350, £1,046 and AU$1,804). I love it for its sweet sound and soundstage depth, but the Ares’ purity and superior clarity was in another league. The music popped into focus, as if veils had been lifted. The Border Patrol SE sound was gorgeous, but it sounded a tad sluggish after I spent some time with the Ares. Though I try to avoid using the term “musical” to describe the sound of components, that’s exactly what made the Ares special. There was a live quality to the sound, more bounce to the rhythms, more visceral impact in the bass. I was shaken by this little converter, the entry-level model from Denafrips. I hope to get my hands on one of its higher-end models in the coming months. Vinshine Audio is the global distributor for Denafrips; all products are direct shipped from Guangzhou, China, to each customer. The Ares current price is $680 in the US, £550 in the UK and AU$980 in Australia. Share your voice Comments The Audiophiliac Audio Home Entertainment 6 Tagslast_img read more

Dangerous Intersections and Allegations of Sign Stealing The Good Bad and Ugly

first_img X Share 00:00 /14:44 Listen A lot can happen in a week, some of it good. Some of it bad. And some of it downright ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, Houston Matters turns to a rotating panel of non-experts to break down The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly of it all.This week, our panel weighs in on these stories:A study that showed many of Houston’s most dangerous intersections aren’t necessarily where you think they areAllegations of sign stealing against the AstrosOur panel of non-experts this week includes:Natalie Arceneaux, managing partner of C+A Global Group and co-host of the Dynamic Duo of Defiance podcastMarcus Davis, owner of The Breakfast Klub restaurant and host of Sunday Morning Live on Majic 102Evan Mintz, deputy opinion editor for the Houston Chronicle To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

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first_img X Share 00:00 /14:44 Listen A lot can happen in a week, some of it good. Some of it bad. And some of it downright ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, Houston Matters turns to a rotating panel of non-experts to break down The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly of it all.This week, our panel weighs in on these stories:A study that showed many of Houston’s most dangerous intersections aren’t necessarily where you think they areAllegations of sign stealing against the AstrosOur panel of non-experts this week includes:Natalie Arceneaux, managing partner of C+A Global Group and co-host of the Dynamic Duo of Defiance podcastMarcus Davis, owner of The Breakfast Klub restaurant and host of Sunday Morning Live on Majic 102Evan Mintz, deputy opinion editor for the Houston Chronicle To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

Houston Flood Czar Stopping Development In 100Year Floodplain Not Going To Happen

first_imgAfter every big storm in Greater Houston, complaints about flooding seem to grow.Last month, Kingwood resident Aaron Fuller posted a Facebook video where he gave viewers a tour of a new development near his house.“The more they build back here in our backyard and tear down waterways, the more water we’re going to get, folks,” he said.The developers of that project said there’s no connection between the construction and the nearby homes that flooded for the first time.It’s just one example of new development that local authorities have allowed, despite a lot of discussion since Hurricane Harvey about how paving in Houston worsens flooding and despite recommendations from some experts.According to Texas A&M professor Sam Brody, there are valid reasons to question new pavement upstream of where you live. “I can’t tell you how many times I get an email or a phone call where somebody says, ‘Well, I’ve lived here for 30 years and I’ve never flooded before. Why am I flooding now? And I’m not in a floodplain,’” Brody said. “And every single time, there’s some kind of — we call it ‘land use change’ — some development that has occurred upstream.” Brody, who is the lead technical expert on Gov. Greg Abbott’s Commission to Rebuild Texas, said public officials should consider science and data — the maps and models — when they plan new development.“We just need to think more carefully about where we put that pavement,” Brody said. “I don’t think we need to stop growing, just grow smarter in more appropriate places.”However, just two weeks ago, Houston City Council approved a new municipal utility district in the 100-year floodplain. That means 620 acres of vacant land will be developed upstream of Addicks Dam, which protects the city from floodwater. In an interview with News 88.7, Houston’s flood czar, Steve Costello, said that for now the city has no plans to stop building in the 100-year floodplain. “I know people would like that to happen,” he said. “But that’s not going to happen.” Brody said other flood-prone areas around the world like the Netherlands are planning for 10,000-year storms. In Houston, officials are still allowing new construction in the path of a 100-year storm. “I’m often the butt of jokes in meetings all over the country,” Brody said.Shannon Harrison/Houston Public MediaThe Houston region continues to build in this part of the 100-year floodplain.‘Death By 1,000 Cuts’The problem, Brody said, isn’t one individual development.“It’s the accumulation of development in areas and in ways that are unsustainable that creates the problem and it’s something that happens over time,” he said. “It’s kind of this death by a thousand cuts approach to development and then we have unintended consequences down the line.”In an April report from the Greater Houston Flood Mitigation Consortium, researchers recommended that the city prohibit development in some flood-prone areas. “You don’t have to be an expert to actually understand that putting in a lot of pavement, especially further away from the city center, will create worsening of flooding, and that flooding will be felt by those downstream,” said Texas Southern University professor Earthea Nance, who co-wrote the report.“This is a general fact, that people who do the modeling, people who have looked at the ordinances, people that look at this in a general way, have all come to the same conclusion. That’s what the data show.” Still, Houston tends to add new pavement in vulnerable places. “It might seem like a no-brainer, if you just arrived and you’re like ‘Oh, of course, we shouldn’t be in the floodway,’ for example,” Nance said. “But once you know there’s a history of, under certain conditions, construction being allowed in the floodway, or in other hazardous areas, it’s harder to then stop it because it’s already there. So that would take an effort to change that rule – and we recommend that it should be changed.”Shannon Harrison/Houston Public MediaLand in the new municipal utility district.Property Rights IssueWhen the municipal utility district vote came up two weeks ago, five of the 16 Houston city council members voted against the proposal, which surprised Nance. “In the past, it would just be, ‘Well, no one understands the relationship between paving and the location of the paving and the situation with the flooding.’ And now some people do,” Nance said. “So it’s good that it got debate.” Council Member Brenda Stardig is one of the five who voted against letting the development move forward. She said flooding experts have warned her about the downstream effects of adding more development west of Addicks Dam.“I would hope that no one would carry anything forward if they thought it was a serious issue, a negative impact to our drainage, that they would put it on the agenda,” Stardig said. “But you know, I have to look back in history when you’ve got people that signed off on development in the pool of the two large dams.” Before council took the vote, Houston’s chief recovery officer Costello defended the project.“So this is a project where it is in the floodplain, but because of all the drainage-related improvements they’re doing within the project itself, they’re removing all of the project out of the floodplain,” Costello said.Stardig remained unconvinced. “I think there’s more involved than the straight up dynamics of that particular location,” she said later. “There’s a broader picture.”Costello told News 88.7 that the city can influence development like this by holding back approval, but to the best of his knowledge, city council has never voted against a municipal utility district. “This is a property rights issue,” Costello said. “As long as they meet federal standards, as long as they meet government standards, then they have the right to develop.”Shannon Harrison/Houston Public MediaCity Council voted to approve the municipal utility district.More Comprehensive Flood MapsWhether or not the city of Houston makes changes, the floodplain itself is changing. Nance said one of the key takeaways from her Greater Houston Flood Mitigation Consortium report was the need for more accurate information. She said existing floodplain maps don’t take into account all of the reasons why Houston homes flood. In order to do that, Houston would need a comprehensive flood risk map. “The flood risk map would show the actual risk at any point on the map,” Nance said. “So that means the artificial idea there’s just this line and you’re inside or outside – that would be gone. It also would show the risk under any scenario of flooding. Instead of only showing flooding when the water leaves the banks of the bayou, it would show flooding when you get a lot of rainfall, flooding or ponding when you have a drainage problem in your neighborhood.”Nance said states like California, North Carolina and Florida already use these kinds of comprehensive maps. “They have maps where you can go in, enter your address, and you can find out not only what your risk is now but what your risk will be based on certain urban development that might happen,” she said. “So that’s what we don’t have.” Macie Kelly/Houston Public MediaHomes under construction in the floodplain. Listen Xcenter_img Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /03:54last_img read more

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first_imgAfter every big storm in Greater Houston, complaints about flooding seem to grow.Last month, Kingwood resident Aaron Fuller posted a Facebook video where he gave viewers a tour of a new development near his house.“The more they build back here in our backyard and tear down waterways, the more water we’re going to get, folks,” he said.The developers of that project said there’s no connection between the construction and the nearby homes that flooded for the first time.It’s just one example of new development that local authorities have allowed, despite a lot of discussion since Hurricane Harvey about how paving in Houston worsens flooding and despite recommendations from some experts.According to Texas A&M professor Sam Brody, there are valid reasons to question new pavement upstream of where you live. “I can’t tell you how many times I get an email or a phone call where somebody says, ‘Well, I’ve lived here for 30 years and I’ve never flooded before. Why am I flooding now? And I’m not in a floodplain,’” Brody said. “And every single time, there’s some kind of — we call it ‘land use change’ — some development that has occurred upstream.” Brody, who is the lead technical expert on Gov. Greg Abbott’s Commission to Rebuild Texas, said public officials should consider science and data — the maps and models — when they plan new development.“We just need to think more carefully about where we put that pavement,” Brody said. “I don’t think we need to stop growing, just grow smarter in more appropriate places.”However, just two weeks ago, Houston City Council approved a new municipal utility district in the 100-year floodplain. That means 620 acres of vacant land will be developed upstream of Addicks Dam, which protects the city from floodwater. In an interview with News 88.7, Houston’s flood czar, Steve Costello, said that for now the city has no plans to stop building in the 100-year floodplain. “I know people would like that to happen,” he said. “But that’s not going to happen.” Brody said other flood-prone areas around the world like the Netherlands are planning for 10,000-year storms. In Houston, officials are still allowing new construction in the path of a 100-year storm. “I’m often the butt of jokes in meetings all over the country,” Brody said.Shannon Harrison/Houston Public MediaThe Houston region continues to build in this part of the 100-year floodplain.‘Death By 1,000 Cuts’The problem, Brody said, isn’t one individual development.“It’s the accumulation of development in areas and in ways that are unsustainable that creates the problem and it’s something that happens over time,” he said. “It’s kind of this death by a thousand cuts approach to development and then we have unintended consequences down the line.”In an April report from the Greater Houston Flood Mitigation Consortium, researchers recommended that the city prohibit development in some flood-prone areas. “You don’t have to be an expert to actually understand that putting in a lot of pavement, especially further away from the city center, will create worsening of flooding, and that flooding will be felt by those downstream,” said Texas Southern University professor Earthea Nance, who co-wrote the report.“This is a general fact, that people who do the modeling, people who have looked at the ordinances, people that look at this in a general way, have all come to the same conclusion. That’s what the data show.” Still, Houston tends to add new pavement in vulnerable places. “It might seem like a no-brainer, if you just arrived and you’re like ‘Oh, of course, we shouldn’t be in the floodway,’ for example,” Nance said. “But once you know there’s a history of, under certain conditions, construction being allowed in the floodway, or in other hazardous areas, it’s harder to then stop it because it’s already there. So that would take an effort to change that rule – and we recommend that it should be changed.”Shannon Harrison/Houston Public MediaLand in the new municipal utility district.Property Rights IssueWhen the municipal utility district vote came up two weeks ago, five of the 16 Houston city council members voted against the proposal, which surprised Nance. “In the past, it would just be, ‘Well, no one understands the relationship between paving and the location of the paving and the situation with the flooding.’ And now some people do,” Nance said. “So it’s good that it got debate.” Council Member Brenda Stardig is one of the five who voted against letting the development move forward. She said flooding experts have warned her about the downstream effects of adding more development west of Addicks Dam.“I would hope that no one would carry anything forward if they thought it was a serious issue, a negative impact to our drainage, that they would put it on the agenda,” Stardig said. “But you know, I have to look back in history when you’ve got people that signed off on development in the pool of the two large dams.” Before council took the vote, Houston’s chief recovery officer Costello defended the project.“So this is a project where it is in the floodplain, but because of all the drainage-related improvements they’re doing within the project itself, they’re removing all of the project out of the floodplain,” Costello said.Stardig remained unconvinced. “I think there’s more involved than the straight up dynamics of that particular location,” she said later. “There’s a broader picture.”Costello told News 88.7 that the city can influence development like this by holding back approval, but to the best of his knowledge, city council has never voted against a municipal utility district. “This is a property rights issue,” Costello said. “As long as they meet federal standards, as long as they meet government standards, then they have the right to develop.”Shannon Harrison/Houston Public MediaCity Council voted to approve the municipal utility district.More Comprehensive Flood MapsWhether or not the city of Houston makes changes, the floodplain itself is changing. Nance said one of the key takeaways from her Greater Houston Flood Mitigation Consortium report was the need for more accurate information. She said existing floodplain maps don’t take into account all of the reasons why Houston homes flood. In order to do that, Houston would need a comprehensive flood risk map. “The flood risk map would show the actual risk at any point on the map,” Nance said. “So that means the artificial idea there’s just this line and you’re inside or outside – that would be gone. It also would show the risk under any scenario of flooding. Instead of only showing flooding when the water leaves the banks of the bayou, it would show flooding when you get a lot of rainfall, flooding or ponding when you have a drainage problem in your neighborhood.”Nance said states like California, North Carolina and Florida already use these kinds of comprehensive maps. “They have maps where you can go in, enter your address, and you can find out not only what your risk is now but what your risk will be based on certain urban development that might happen,” she said. “So that’s what we don’t have.” Macie Kelly/Houston Public MediaHomes under construction in the floodplain. Listen Xcenter_img Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /03:54last_img read more