Feds commit cash to preserve Inuit art and culture in Winnipeg

first_imgMatt Thordarson APTN National NewsThe federal government has made a major commitment to conserve Inuit art and culture in Winnipeg.Canada is putting millions of dollars into a centre to give people in the south a chance to learn more about their northern neighbours.Matt Thordarson reports.last_img

-->

first_imgMatt Thordarson APTN National NewsThe federal government has made a major commitment to conserve Inuit art and culture in Winnipeg.Canada is putting millions of dollars into a centre to give people in the south a chance to learn more about their northern neighbours.Matt Thordarson reports.last_img

North Dakota police in standoff with demonstrators at private ranch near DAPL

first_img(A line of North Dakota police are trying to stop anti-pipeline demonstrators from gaining access to a nearby construction site. Photo: Tamara Pimentel/APTN)APTN National NewsDemonstrators in North Dakota are in a stand-off with local police at a private ranch near where a section of the Dakota Access LLC pipeline is being built. APTN reporter Tamara Pimentel says medics are on hand and police are threatening to use tear gas.According to a statement from the Morton County Sheriff’s Department, the stand-off is taking place on the banks of the Cantapeta Creek. Police say demonstrators are trying to gain access to the Cannon Ball Ranch. The ranch was sold to Dakota Access Pipeline LLC (DAPL) in September.Members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe say the ranch contains hundreds of burials and artifacts.“Early this morning, law enforcement witnessed a group of protesters building a hand-made, wooden pedestrian bridge across the Cantapeta Creek,” said the Sheriff’s Department statement. “Officers responded and ordered protesters to remove themselves from the bridge and notified them that if they cross the bridge they would be arrested.”The statement goes on to say the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) gave the Sherriff’s department orders to have the bridge removed and arrest anyone who enters federal land in the area near the ranch. The USACE is currently studying the possibility of rerouting the controversial pipeline.Police say demonstrators continue to gain access by swimming and using other boats to get across the river after authorities destroyed the bridge.More to come.news@aptn.calast_img read more

-->

first_img(A line of North Dakota police are trying to stop anti-pipeline demonstrators from gaining access to a nearby construction site. Photo: Tamara Pimentel/APTN)APTN National NewsDemonstrators in North Dakota are in a stand-off with local police at a private ranch near where a section of the Dakota Access LLC pipeline is being built. APTN reporter Tamara Pimentel says medics are on hand and police are threatening to use tear gas.According to a statement from the Morton County Sheriff’s Department, the stand-off is taking place on the banks of the Cantapeta Creek. Police say demonstrators are trying to gain access to the Cannon Ball Ranch. The ranch was sold to Dakota Access Pipeline LLC (DAPL) in September.Members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe say the ranch contains hundreds of burials and artifacts.“Early this morning, law enforcement witnessed a group of protesters building a hand-made, wooden pedestrian bridge across the Cantapeta Creek,” said the Sheriff’s Department statement. “Officers responded and ordered protesters to remove themselves from the bridge and notified them that if they cross the bridge they would be arrested.”The statement goes on to say the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) gave the Sherriff’s department orders to have the bridge removed and arrest anyone who enters federal land in the area near the ranch. The USACE is currently studying the possibility of rerouting the controversial pipeline.Police say demonstrators continue to gain access by swimming and using other boats to get across the river after authorities destroyed the bridge.More to come.news@aptn.calast_img read more

Province of Alberta celebrates Métis week remember Louis Riel

first_imgChris Stewart APTN National NewsAcross Alberta people are celebrating Métis week.In Edmonton, the Alberta government and Métis leaders remembered the achievements and the sacrifice Louis Riel made for his people.cstewart@aptn.calast_img

-->

first_imgChris Stewart APTN National NewsAcross Alberta people are celebrating Métis week.In Edmonton, the Alberta government and Métis leaders remembered the achievements and the sacrifice Louis Riel made for his people.cstewart@aptn.calast_img

BC commits to indigenous control of child welfare after release of report

first_imgThe Canadian PressVANCOUVER _ British Columbia is committed to First Nations taking over child-welfare decisions in their communities, the province’s Children’s Minister said Monday after receiving a report about how the current system has failed Aboriginal children.The report by a special adviser to the ministry issued 85 recommendations to reduce the staggering number of Aboriginal kids in care of the B.C. government. A major focus is the need to return control to Indigenous communities.Premier Christy Clark accepted the report and said the province had already begun work on 40 recommendations and would implement all those that apply to B.C. Other recommendations are directed at the federal government.“Separating a child from his or her family must always be a last resort for government. We must ask ourselves why it is that First Nations children are so much more likely to be separated from their home than others,” Clark said.She did not offer a timeline or an estimated cost, other than to say it would be a “long journey” involving a “significant investment.”The 40 recommendations the province is already working on include regular meetings with Metis and First Nations leaders, recruiting Indigenous people to work in the ministry and working to better inform Indigenous people about the child-welfare system.Children’s Minister Stephanie Cadieux said her ministry has begun discussions with some Aboriginal communities on transferring jurisdiction for child welfare, either under current provincial legislation or legislation they write themselves.“We agree that Indigenous families and communities should be the ones deciding their futures,” she said.Grand Chief Ed John was appointed a special adviser on Indigenous child-welfare in September 2015. Since then, John has had discussions with First Nations leaders, delegated Aboriginal agencies and the provincial and federal governments.Called “Indigenous Resilience, Connectedness and Reunification – From Root Causes to Root Solutions,” the document is John’s final report.“The report is entitled ‘Indigenous Resilience.’ Well, hope is the source of that resilience,” John said.The report’s detailed recommendations are divided into 10 key categories, including ensuring direct support for Indigenous children and families and enabling greater access to legal services.It also urges a more equitable funding formula between the province and federal government, an increase in early intervention services, better reunification and permanency planning, and nurturing a sense of belonging and prioritizing culture.Finally, the report calls for a national strategy for Indigenous child welfare.The portion of Aboriginal kids in B.C. care has increased over the past decade, from 50 per cent in 2006 to 61 per cent this year, and Clark’s government has faced fierce criticism on the issue.Last year, B.C.’s representative of children and youth released a report that blamed the overdose death of a legally-blind aboriginal girl on “professional indifference.”After an Aboriginal teen jumped to his death from a hotel window, the ministry and children’s representative undertook a sweeping review that revealed 117 children in the province’s care were placed in hotels in 2015.Melanie Mark, child-welfare critic for the Opposition New Democrats, said John’s report exposed how easy it was for Aboriginal kids to fall through the cracks. But she called the premier’s announcement a lot of “fluff” and “high-level talk” without a lot of detail or commitment.“Today would have been great if the premier committed to truth and reconciliation and the calls to action,” Mark said. “That would have been true leadership.”Cheam First Nation Chief Ernie Crey said he met with John during consultations on the report and urged him to ensure that Aboriginal kids are not taken out of their communities and placed in non-Aboriginal homes when they are put in foster care.“They start to lose their identity and their identification with the community,” he said. “That’s where a lot of the difficulties facing Aboriginal kids in care start.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

-->

first_imgThe Canadian PressVANCOUVER _ British Columbia is committed to First Nations taking over child-welfare decisions in their communities, the province’s Children’s Minister said Monday after receiving a report about how the current system has failed Aboriginal children.The report by a special adviser to the ministry issued 85 recommendations to reduce the staggering number of Aboriginal kids in care of the B.C. government. A major focus is the need to return control to Indigenous communities.Premier Christy Clark accepted the report and said the province had already begun work on 40 recommendations and would implement all those that apply to B.C. Other recommendations are directed at the federal government.“Separating a child from his or her family must always be a last resort for government. We must ask ourselves why it is that First Nations children are so much more likely to be separated from their home than others,” Clark said.She did not offer a timeline or an estimated cost, other than to say it would be a “long journey” involving a “significant investment.”The 40 recommendations the province is already working on include regular meetings with Metis and First Nations leaders, recruiting Indigenous people to work in the ministry and working to better inform Indigenous people about the child-welfare system.Children’s Minister Stephanie Cadieux said her ministry has begun discussions with some Aboriginal communities on transferring jurisdiction for child welfare, either under current provincial legislation or legislation they write themselves.“We agree that Indigenous families and communities should be the ones deciding their futures,” she said.Grand Chief Ed John was appointed a special adviser on Indigenous child-welfare in September 2015. Since then, John has had discussions with First Nations leaders, delegated Aboriginal agencies and the provincial and federal governments.Called “Indigenous Resilience, Connectedness and Reunification – From Root Causes to Root Solutions,” the document is John’s final report.“The report is entitled ‘Indigenous Resilience.’ Well, hope is the source of that resilience,” John said.The report’s detailed recommendations are divided into 10 key categories, including ensuring direct support for Indigenous children and families and enabling greater access to legal services.It also urges a more equitable funding formula between the province and federal government, an increase in early intervention services, better reunification and permanency planning, and nurturing a sense of belonging and prioritizing culture.Finally, the report calls for a national strategy for Indigenous child welfare.The portion of Aboriginal kids in B.C. care has increased over the past decade, from 50 per cent in 2006 to 61 per cent this year, and Clark’s government has faced fierce criticism on the issue.Last year, B.C.’s representative of children and youth released a report that blamed the overdose death of a legally-blind aboriginal girl on “professional indifference.”After an Aboriginal teen jumped to his death from a hotel window, the ministry and children’s representative undertook a sweeping review that revealed 117 children in the province’s care were placed in hotels in 2015.Melanie Mark, child-welfare critic for the Opposition New Democrats, said John’s report exposed how easy it was for Aboriginal kids to fall through the cracks. But she called the premier’s announcement a lot of “fluff” and “high-level talk” without a lot of detail or commitment.“Today would have been great if the premier committed to truth and reconciliation and the calls to action,” Mark said. “That would have been true leadership.”Cheam First Nation Chief Ernie Crey said he met with John during consultations on the report and urged him to ensure that Aboriginal kids are not taken out of their communities and placed in non-Aboriginal homes when they are put in foster care.“They start to lose their identity and their identification with the community,” he said. “That’s where a lot of the difficulties facing Aboriginal kids in care start.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

Trudeau to issue statement of exoneration for Tsilhqotin chiefs

first_imgThe Canadian PressPrime Minister Justin Trudeau is set to exonerate six First Nations chiefs who were executed by British Columbia’s colonial government more than 150 years ago.Trudeau’s itinerary says he will “deliver a statement of exoneration” for the Tsilhqot’in chiefs in the House of Commons at 3 p.m.The warriors were hanged following a deadly confrontation with white road builders during the so-called “Chilcotin War of 1864.”After the workers were killed, five chiefs arrived at what they believed would be peace talks with government representatives. Instead, they were arrested, tried and hanged, and a sixth chief was executed the following year in New Westminster.The Tsilhqot’in have long disputed the government’s authority to execute the six chiefs as criminals, describing the confrontation as an altercation between warring nations.The B.C. government apologized for the executions in 1993 and installed a commemorative plaque at the site of the hangings.Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett is scheduled to hold a press conference alongside the Tsilhqot’in Nation leadership today in Ottawa following the official exoneration.last_img read more

-->

first_imgThe Canadian PressPrime Minister Justin Trudeau is set to exonerate six First Nations chiefs who were executed by British Columbia’s colonial government more than 150 years ago.Trudeau’s itinerary says he will “deliver a statement of exoneration” for the Tsilhqot’in chiefs in the House of Commons at 3 p.m.The warriors were hanged following a deadly confrontation with white road builders during the so-called “Chilcotin War of 1864.”After the workers were killed, five chiefs arrived at what they believed would be peace talks with government representatives. Instead, they were arrested, tried and hanged, and a sixth chief was executed the following year in New Westminster.The Tsilhqot’in have long disputed the government’s authority to execute the six chiefs as criminals, describing the confrontation as an altercation between warring nations.The B.C. government apologized for the executions in 1993 and installed a commemorative plaque at the site of the hangings.Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett is scheduled to hold a press conference alongside the Tsilhqot’in Nation leadership today in Ottawa following the official exoneration.last_img read more

New Brunswick unveils plans for Crownrun marijuana stores plus home delivery

first_imgFREDERICTON – New Brunswickers will buy their legal marijuana at a subsidiary of the province’s liquor commission — and have sommelier-like staff to guide them.The province also announced Wednesday the stores will be more tightly controlled than liquor outlets, but home delivery will be available.“No one under the legal age will be allowed inside the premises. That will happen at the reception area, after which people will be able to enter the retail environment,” NB Liquor president Brian Harriman told a news conference.“The product will be displayed under glass cases and it will be a one-on-one shopping experience … We will ensure our retail staff are highly trained and able to educate and help people who want to learn about cannabis have that opportunity in the store environment.”Finance Minister Cathy Rogers said other jurisdictions like Colorado and Washington recommended starting with tight government oversight, and New Brunswick’s Crown-owned liquor agency is well-positioned for the job.“NB Liquor has the experience in the retail market selling a regulated substance, and we believe their knowledge and expertise will provide for a smooth transition into this new territory,” she said.The federal government is expected to legalize recreational marijuana starting in July 2018, although some provinces, territories and police agencies have lobbied for a delay. Federal Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor has said the government is sticking to the deadline, and Rogers says that’s the date New Brunswick is preparing for.A tender was recently issued for 20 retail locations in 15 communities across the province.Harriman said the retail locations will be separate from anywhere liquor is now sold. The number of employees has not been determined, but each will require a lot of product knowledge, he said.Jamie Agnew, president of the CUPE local that represents about 500 NB Liquor employees, said staff will have to be trained much like sommeliers in liquor stores.“People need to know about the CBDs and the THCs, sativa and indica. There’s a lot of science around the marijuana now. Just as in wine and scotch, there’s a tasting wheel,” said Agnew, who currently uses medicinal marijuana himself.Last month, Ontario announced it plans to set the minimum age at 19 and sell cannabis through government-run outlets.Earlier this month, Alberta proposed to make 18 the minimum age to use cannabis, with no decision yet on whether to sell cannabis through government-run stores or through private operators. The Nova Scotia government is seeking feedback on a legal age of 19 for marijuana use, with sales through a Crown corporation like the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation.Ross Wetmore, a critic for the Opposition Progressive Conservatives in New Brunswick, said his party would have preferred a private retail model, but will reserve further comment until they see all the details.The minimum age to buy recreational marijuana, pricing, the name of the new stores, and the kind of education programs have yet to be determined.Wetmore said many of those things should already be decided.“We should have been starting our education right now. We are behind on that. Law enforcement has some concerns. We have a lot of questions to ask of the minister,” Wetmore said.Harriman said online sales will also be available for pick-up at a retail store or home delivery.He said it has not been determined who will do the home delivery, but it will require the same kind of identification and age verification at the door that’s now in place for delivery of medicinal marijuana.Both Rogers and Harriman say the goal is to get recreational cannabis out of the hands of young people and criminals.Harriman said the experience in other places such as Colorado has been that the illegal market is reduced significantly once sales are controlled and legalized.Rogers said illegal dispensaries will remain illegal, and an issue for public safety officials to deal with.last_img read more

-->

first_imgFREDERICTON – New Brunswickers will buy their legal marijuana at a subsidiary of the province’s liquor commission — and have sommelier-like staff to guide them.The province also announced Wednesday the stores will be more tightly controlled than liquor outlets, but home delivery will be available.“No one under the legal age will be allowed inside the premises. That will happen at the reception area, after which people will be able to enter the retail environment,” NB Liquor president Brian Harriman told a news conference.“The product will be displayed under glass cases and it will be a one-on-one shopping experience … We will ensure our retail staff are highly trained and able to educate and help people who want to learn about cannabis have that opportunity in the store environment.”Finance Minister Cathy Rogers said other jurisdictions like Colorado and Washington recommended starting with tight government oversight, and New Brunswick’s Crown-owned liquor agency is well-positioned for the job.“NB Liquor has the experience in the retail market selling a regulated substance, and we believe their knowledge and expertise will provide for a smooth transition into this new territory,” she said.The federal government is expected to legalize recreational marijuana starting in July 2018, although some provinces, territories and police agencies have lobbied for a delay. Federal Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor has said the government is sticking to the deadline, and Rogers says that’s the date New Brunswick is preparing for.A tender was recently issued for 20 retail locations in 15 communities across the province.Harriman said the retail locations will be separate from anywhere liquor is now sold. The number of employees has not been determined, but each will require a lot of product knowledge, he said.Jamie Agnew, president of the CUPE local that represents about 500 NB Liquor employees, said staff will have to be trained much like sommeliers in liquor stores.“People need to know about the CBDs and the THCs, sativa and indica. There’s a lot of science around the marijuana now. Just as in wine and scotch, there’s a tasting wheel,” said Agnew, who currently uses medicinal marijuana himself.Last month, Ontario announced it plans to set the minimum age at 19 and sell cannabis through government-run outlets.Earlier this month, Alberta proposed to make 18 the minimum age to use cannabis, with no decision yet on whether to sell cannabis through government-run stores or through private operators. The Nova Scotia government is seeking feedback on a legal age of 19 for marijuana use, with sales through a Crown corporation like the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation.Ross Wetmore, a critic for the Opposition Progressive Conservatives in New Brunswick, said his party would have preferred a private retail model, but will reserve further comment until they see all the details.The minimum age to buy recreational marijuana, pricing, the name of the new stores, and the kind of education programs have yet to be determined.Wetmore said many of those things should already be decided.“We should have been starting our education right now. We are behind on that. Law enforcement has some concerns. We have a lot of questions to ask of the minister,” Wetmore said.Harriman said online sales will also be available for pick-up at a retail store or home delivery.He said it has not been determined who will do the home delivery, but it will require the same kind of identification and age verification at the door that’s now in place for delivery of medicinal marijuana.Both Rogers and Harriman say the goal is to get recreational cannabis out of the hands of young people and criminals.Harriman said the experience in other places such as Colorado has been that the illegal market is reduced significantly once sales are controlled and legalized.Rogers said illegal dispensaries will remain illegal, and an issue for public safety officials to deal with.last_img read more

Canada takes softwood lumber dispute with US to NAFTA appeal panel

first_imgOTTAWA – Canada is turning to the North American Free Trade Agreement in its bid to stop U.S. duties on Canadian softwood lumber.A letter from a Canadian lawyer was hand-delivered Tuesday to the American NAFTA secretariat in Washington, requesting a panel review “in regard to the final determination of the U.S. Department of Commerce in the countervailing duty investigation of softwood lumber from Canada.”In a written statement, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada will “forcefully defend Canada’s softwood lumber industry.”“The U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision on punitive countervailing and anti-dumping duties against Canada’s softwood lumber producers is unfair, unwarranted, and deeply troubling,” she said.The challenge comes under section 19 of NAFTA, one of the sections in the crosshairs of U.S. President Donald Trump as the trilateral trade pact is renegotiated.Canadian softwood lumber producers have already laid down about $500 million in countervailing and antidumping duties since the U.S. Department of Commerce ruled last spring Canada was unfairly subsidizing its softwood industry and selling wood into the U.S. at unfairly low rates.The main issues stem from the fact that most Canadian softwood is on Crown land and producers pay stumpage fees, set by provincial governments, for the right to harvest the wood. The U.S. Lumber Coalition alleges these fees are deliberately set too low and represent an unfair subsidy to Canadian producers.Canada vigorously denies these claims and has won several NAFTA challenges over similar softwood issues in the past.Earlier this month, the U.S. government made final decisions about the amount of duty that would be charged on Canadian softwood, with the final total averaging about 21 per cent, down from almost 27 per cent in the initial decisions.Canada and the U.S. have battled over softwood for decades and the disputes have been before both NAFTA and the World Trade Organization multiple times. Canada has won almost all of those challenges, and even in cases where Canada was found to be subsidizing its industry, NAFTA panels or the WTO have said the subsidy was so minimal it had no effect on U.S. producers.Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr has repeatedly said Canada has every reason to believe it would prevail in such a challenge again.However, until Tuesday it wasn’t clear whether Canada would take that route again in the midst of difficult NAFTA renegotiations, particularly given the American objective to eliminate Chapter 19 altogether.Chapter 19 establishes a panel of five arbiters, agreed upon by both countries, who will decide if the duties meet U.S. law. Without that mechanism, Canada would have to use the U.S. court system to make such a challenge.Canada likes Chapter 19 because it doesn’t trust the U.S. courts to be fair and timely in reviewing international trade challenges. The Trump administration believes the U.S. court system should determine if American laws are being properly applied; if the panel decides they aren’t, the U.S. would have to refund the money collected.A Canadian government official said Tuesday that Canada could decide to take its case to the WTO as well, in addition to the NAFTA challenge.Canada and the United States are attempting to negotiate a new softwood deal that would dictate how much wood Canada can sell to the U.S. The last deal expired two years ago.Thus far Canadian producers have been shielded from too much harm from the duties because of high market prices and the low Canadian dollar.— follow @mrabson on Twitter.last_img read more

-->

first_imgOTTAWA – Canada is turning to the North American Free Trade Agreement in its bid to stop U.S. duties on Canadian softwood lumber.A letter from a Canadian lawyer was hand-delivered Tuesday to the American NAFTA secretariat in Washington, requesting a panel review “in regard to the final determination of the U.S. Department of Commerce in the countervailing duty investigation of softwood lumber from Canada.”In a written statement, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada will “forcefully defend Canada’s softwood lumber industry.”“The U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision on punitive countervailing and anti-dumping duties against Canada’s softwood lumber producers is unfair, unwarranted, and deeply troubling,” she said.The challenge comes under section 19 of NAFTA, one of the sections in the crosshairs of U.S. President Donald Trump as the trilateral trade pact is renegotiated.Canadian softwood lumber producers have already laid down about $500 million in countervailing and antidumping duties since the U.S. Department of Commerce ruled last spring Canada was unfairly subsidizing its softwood industry and selling wood into the U.S. at unfairly low rates.The main issues stem from the fact that most Canadian softwood is on Crown land and producers pay stumpage fees, set by provincial governments, for the right to harvest the wood. The U.S. Lumber Coalition alleges these fees are deliberately set too low and represent an unfair subsidy to Canadian producers.Canada vigorously denies these claims and has won several NAFTA challenges over similar softwood issues in the past.Earlier this month, the U.S. government made final decisions about the amount of duty that would be charged on Canadian softwood, with the final total averaging about 21 per cent, down from almost 27 per cent in the initial decisions.Canada and the U.S. have battled over softwood for decades and the disputes have been before both NAFTA and the World Trade Organization multiple times. Canada has won almost all of those challenges, and even in cases where Canada was found to be subsidizing its industry, NAFTA panels or the WTO have said the subsidy was so minimal it had no effect on U.S. producers.Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr has repeatedly said Canada has every reason to believe it would prevail in such a challenge again.However, until Tuesday it wasn’t clear whether Canada would take that route again in the midst of difficult NAFTA renegotiations, particularly given the American objective to eliminate Chapter 19 altogether.Chapter 19 establishes a panel of five arbiters, agreed upon by both countries, who will decide if the duties meet U.S. law. Without that mechanism, Canada would have to use the U.S. court system to make such a challenge.Canada likes Chapter 19 because it doesn’t trust the U.S. courts to be fair and timely in reviewing international trade challenges. The Trump administration believes the U.S. court system should determine if American laws are being properly applied; if the panel decides they aren’t, the U.S. would have to refund the money collected.A Canadian government official said Tuesday that Canada could decide to take its case to the WTO as well, in addition to the NAFTA challenge.Canada and the United States are attempting to negotiate a new softwood deal that would dictate how much wood Canada can sell to the U.S. The last deal expired two years ago.Thus far Canadian producers have been shielded from too much harm from the duties because of high market prices and the low Canadian dollar.— follow @mrabson on Twitter.last_img read more

Aurora Cannabis follows up greenhouse designer deal with Quebec producer buyout

first_imgFast-growing Aurora Cannabis Inc. struck twice Thursday, announcing the purchase of greenhouse design firm Larssen Ltd. in the morning and medical marijuana applicant H2 Biopharma Inc. of Lachute, Que., for up to $25 million in stock after markets closed.The Alberta-based cannabis producer said in the later news release that Larssen’s expertise will “play an instrumental role” in the final design of H2’s 4,300-square-metre cannabis production facility in the Montreal area, which it said is 80 per cent construction complete.Aurora said it intends to use its ownership of Larssen to pressure other cannabis producers to enter partnerships.Larssen is involved with more than 15 cannabis industry clients globally, including five Canadian licensed producers, but its Canadian deals will be reassessed once the buyout announced Thursday is completed, it said.“We’re going to certainly encourage those to proceed but we’re going to require some level of partnership, whether that be an equity stake or a supply agreement or other things,” said Aurora (TSX:ACB) executive vice-president Cam Battley.“We’re open to various formulae.”He wouldn’t name the five Canadian companies but said they don’t include CanniMed Therapeutics Inc., against which it is pursuing an all-stock hostile takeover bid, or Newstrike Resources Ltd., a company CanniMed is attempting to buy.According to its website, cannabis producer The Green Organic Dutchman Holdings Ltd. is working with Larssen to build a large greenhouse in Quebec. It did not return a request for comment Thursday.Analyst Russell Stanley of Echelon Wealth Partners, who covers CanniMed but not Aurora, said he doesn’t know which Canadian companies Aurora is referring to in its release.He said it’s highly unusual for the buyer of a service company to so publicly declare that it will revise its deals with competitors.“I think in the context of also announcing plans to launch a hostile (bid) for CanniMed, clearly Aurora is being very aggressive in its growth strategy,” he said.He said the rapid rise in share price for Aurora and other cannabis companies means they can afford to make acquisitions very cheaply through stock offers.“You’re going to see M&A activity pick up, scale is going to become increasingly important,” he said.Aurora shares gained 32 cents or about five per cent to close at $6.74 on Thursday.Financial terms of the Larssen deal were not disclosed, but Aurora said they include performance-based milestone payments.Larssen, which has offices in Denmark and Burlington, Ont., is designing, engineering and overseeing construction of the half-built Aurora Sky cannabis greenhouse near the Edmonton International Airport which will have capacity to produce 100,000 kilograms of cannabis per year.Battley said the facility will be a closed system hybrid greenhouse capable of precise control of light, heat, humidity and nutrients to produce “ultra low cost” cannabis. To ensure no contaminants enter the system, the air system is designed to be overpressured and overhead robotic cranes will help to replace humans in the growing areas.Thomas Larssen, principal owner of Larssen Ltd., is to head up a new subsidiary called Aurora Larssen Projects Ltd.Aurora said Larssen is on pace to generate about $6 million in revenue in the next 12 months.H2 Biopharma is a late-stage medical marijuana licence applicant, Aurora said. Its facility is to produce up to 4,500 kilograms of cannabis per year and is situated on property that will allow expansion.Aurora said it will make an initial payment of $10 million in shares, with further payments dependent on completion of the facility, granting of cultivation and sales licences by Health Canada and municipal approval for expansion of the facility.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.last_img read more

-->

first_imgFast-growing Aurora Cannabis Inc. struck twice Thursday, announcing the purchase of greenhouse design firm Larssen Ltd. in the morning and medical marijuana applicant H2 Biopharma Inc. of Lachute, Que., for up to $25 million in stock after markets closed.The Alberta-based cannabis producer said in the later news release that Larssen’s expertise will “play an instrumental role” in the final design of H2’s 4,300-square-metre cannabis production facility in the Montreal area, which it said is 80 per cent construction complete.Aurora said it intends to use its ownership of Larssen to pressure other cannabis producers to enter partnerships.Larssen is involved with more than 15 cannabis industry clients globally, including five Canadian licensed producers, but its Canadian deals will be reassessed once the buyout announced Thursday is completed, it said.“We’re going to certainly encourage those to proceed but we’re going to require some level of partnership, whether that be an equity stake or a supply agreement or other things,” said Aurora (TSX:ACB) executive vice-president Cam Battley.“We’re open to various formulae.”He wouldn’t name the five Canadian companies but said they don’t include CanniMed Therapeutics Inc., against which it is pursuing an all-stock hostile takeover bid, or Newstrike Resources Ltd., a company CanniMed is attempting to buy.According to its website, cannabis producer The Green Organic Dutchman Holdings Ltd. is working with Larssen to build a large greenhouse in Quebec. It did not return a request for comment Thursday.Analyst Russell Stanley of Echelon Wealth Partners, who covers CanniMed but not Aurora, said he doesn’t know which Canadian companies Aurora is referring to in its release.He said it’s highly unusual for the buyer of a service company to so publicly declare that it will revise its deals with competitors.“I think in the context of also announcing plans to launch a hostile (bid) for CanniMed, clearly Aurora is being very aggressive in its growth strategy,” he said.He said the rapid rise in share price for Aurora and other cannabis companies means they can afford to make acquisitions very cheaply through stock offers.“You’re going to see M&A activity pick up, scale is going to become increasingly important,” he said.Aurora shares gained 32 cents or about five per cent to close at $6.74 on Thursday.Financial terms of the Larssen deal were not disclosed, but Aurora said they include performance-based milestone payments.Larssen, which has offices in Denmark and Burlington, Ont., is designing, engineering and overseeing construction of the half-built Aurora Sky cannabis greenhouse near the Edmonton International Airport which will have capacity to produce 100,000 kilograms of cannabis per year.Battley said the facility will be a closed system hybrid greenhouse capable of precise control of light, heat, humidity and nutrients to produce “ultra low cost” cannabis. To ensure no contaminants enter the system, the air system is designed to be overpressured and overhead robotic cranes will help to replace humans in the growing areas.Thomas Larssen, principal owner of Larssen Ltd., is to head up a new subsidiary called Aurora Larssen Projects Ltd.Aurora said Larssen is on pace to generate about $6 million in revenue in the next 12 months.H2 Biopharma is a late-stage medical marijuana licence applicant, Aurora said. Its facility is to produce up to 4,500 kilograms of cannabis per year and is situated on property that will allow expansion.Aurora said it will make an initial payment of $10 million in shares, with further payments dependent on completion of the facility, granting of cultivation and sales licences by Health Canada and municipal approval for expansion of the facility.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.last_img read more

GermanRussian pipeline takes shape despite US protests

first_imgMUKRAN, Germany – Sparks fly and machines whir as workers busily prepare thousands of steel pipes that will become part of a vast undersea pipeline bringing gas from Russia to Germany’s northeastern Baltic coast.The Nord Stream 2 project will double the amount of natural gas Russia can funnel directly to the heart of Europe from newly tapped reserves in Siberia, intentionally skirting Eastern European nations like Poland and Ukraine. It also promises much-needed jobs in this poor German backwater, some three hours’ drive north of Berlin.The United States and some other German allies have bristled at the project, warning that it could give Moscow greater leverage over Western Europe.Energy-poor Germany already relies heavily on Russian gas and so far Chancellor Angela Merkel has deftly kept the new $11 billion pipeline off the table while imposing sanctions against Russia for its actions in Ukraine.But as plans become closer to reality, the pressure has increased on her, and last month after meetings with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko she acknowledged that Nord Stream 2 was more than just a business project, saying that “political factors have to be taken into account.”With Merkel heading to Sochi on Friday for talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin, a senior U.S. diplomat warned that proceeding with the project could result in sanctions for those involved.“We would be delighted if the project did not take place,” U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary Sandra Oudkirk, an energy policy expert in the State Department, told reporters in Berlin on Thursday.She said Washington is concerned Nord Stream 2 could increase Russia’s “malign influence” in Europe.Oudkirk said the new pipeline would divert gas flows away from Ukraine, which depends heavily on transit fees, and could become a pathway for Russia to install surveillance equipment in the Baltic Sea, a sensitive military region.She said the U.S. is “exerting as much persuasive power” as it can to stop the project, and noted that Congress has given the U.S. administration explicit authority to impose sanctions in connection with Russian pipeline projects if necessary.“Any pipeline project — and there are many multiple pipeline projects in the world that are potentially covered by this sanctions authority — is in an elevated position of sanctions risk,” she said.Jens Mueller, a spokesman for Nord Stream 2, dismissed concerns from the U.S. and several European countries, saying the new pipeline would merely be one of many sources of natural gas for Europe.“This pipeline can’t be used to blackmail or negatively affect any country,” he told The Associated Press in an interview.Merkel’s trip to the Black Sea resort of Sochi, her first visit to Russia in a year, will be a diplomatic balancing act.While the German leader has taken a hard line on Russian actions in recent years — from the conflicts in Ukraine and Syria to the chemical attack on a former Russian spy in Britain — Germany badly needs to secure its gas supply and Berlin has calculated that Nord Stream 2 offers the best deal.Europe’s biggest economy is also the world’s biggest importer of natural gas. According to Kirsten Westphal, an energy policy expert at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs, said its import needs are likely to grow.German chemical giant BASF, a major investor in Nord Stream 2, alone uses more gas than the country of Denmark.Under Merkel, Germany has also set itself an ambitious goal of switching off all nuclear plants by 2022. While renewable power is on the rise, coal forms the bedrock of Germany’s energy mix, a fact that’s not compatible with the country’s pledge to sharply reduce carbon emissions.“If you want to take climate goals seriously then gas is simply an important source of energy,” said Westphal.From the end of 2019 when it’s to go online, the twin pipes of Nord Stream 2 will pump up to 55 billion cubic meters of gas to Western Europe each year, the same as its predecessor Nord Stream 1, which runs from the Russian city of Vyborg under the Baltic to the German city of Greifswald. The additional gas is needed to fill a projected decline in supply from Norway and the Netherlands, as their reserves wane.The aging Ukrainian Gas Transmission System, meanwhile, is a Soviet-era relic in bad need of upgrading and unlikely to be competitive in the foreseeable future. Its loss would be a severe blow to Kyiv, which earns up to 2 billion euros ($2.35 billion) a year from transit fees — some 2 per cent of the country’s gross domestic product.A deal that keeps Kyiv in the mix could help normalize relations between Ukraine and Russia, Moscow and Berlin.“A compromise could be that on the one hand the pipeline project isn’t blocked any further,” said Claudia Kemfert, a senior energy expert at the German Institute for Economic Research. “On the other hand Russia would commit itself to keep using the gas route through Ukraine, so that all sides have a face-saving result.”Merkel’s spokesman Steffen Seibert indicated that some of the gas that passed through Ukraine’s pipes last year — over 90 billion cubic meters — will keep flowing in future.“In the end, but we’re not there yet, it will also be about the volume of gas transiting (through Ukraine),” he said.“Of course it makes a difference how many billion cubic meters it is. But I can’t give you a target number. We believe it needs to be resolved in talks and we hope that, piece by piece, things will move forward.”___Jordans reported from Berlin.last_img read more

-->

first_imgMUKRAN, Germany – Sparks fly and machines whir as workers busily prepare thousands of steel pipes that will become part of a vast undersea pipeline bringing gas from Russia to Germany’s northeastern Baltic coast.The Nord Stream 2 project will double the amount of natural gas Russia can funnel directly to the heart of Europe from newly tapped reserves in Siberia, intentionally skirting Eastern European nations like Poland and Ukraine. It also promises much-needed jobs in this poor German backwater, some three hours’ drive north of Berlin.The United States and some other German allies have bristled at the project, warning that it could give Moscow greater leverage over Western Europe.Energy-poor Germany already relies heavily on Russian gas and so far Chancellor Angela Merkel has deftly kept the new $11 billion pipeline off the table while imposing sanctions against Russia for its actions in Ukraine.But as plans become closer to reality, the pressure has increased on her, and last month after meetings with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko she acknowledged that Nord Stream 2 was more than just a business project, saying that “political factors have to be taken into account.”With Merkel heading to Sochi on Friday for talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin, a senior U.S. diplomat warned that proceeding with the project could result in sanctions for those involved.“We would be delighted if the project did not take place,” U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary Sandra Oudkirk, an energy policy expert in the State Department, told reporters in Berlin on Thursday.She said Washington is concerned Nord Stream 2 could increase Russia’s “malign influence” in Europe.Oudkirk said the new pipeline would divert gas flows away from Ukraine, which depends heavily on transit fees, and could become a pathway for Russia to install surveillance equipment in the Baltic Sea, a sensitive military region.She said the U.S. is “exerting as much persuasive power” as it can to stop the project, and noted that Congress has given the U.S. administration explicit authority to impose sanctions in connection with Russian pipeline projects if necessary.“Any pipeline project — and there are many multiple pipeline projects in the world that are potentially covered by this sanctions authority — is in an elevated position of sanctions risk,” she said.Jens Mueller, a spokesman for Nord Stream 2, dismissed concerns from the U.S. and several European countries, saying the new pipeline would merely be one of many sources of natural gas for Europe.“This pipeline can’t be used to blackmail or negatively affect any country,” he told The Associated Press in an interview.Merkel’s trip to the Black Sea resort of Sochi, her first visit to Russia in a year, will be a diplomatic balancing act.While the German leader has taken a hard line on Russian actions in recent years — from the conflicts in Ukraine and Syria to the chemical attack on a former Russian spy in Britain — Germany badly needs to secure its gas supply and Berlin has calculated that Nord Stream 2 offers the best deal.Europe’s biggest economy is also the world’s biggest importer of natural gas. According to Kirsten Westphal, an energy policy expert at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs, said its import needs are likely to grow.German chemical giant BASF, a major investor in Nord Stream 2, alone uses more gas than the country of Denmark.Under Merkel, Germany has also set itself an ambitious goal of switching off all nuclear plants by 2022. While renewable power is on the rise, coal forms the bedrock of Germany’s energy mix, a fact that’s not compatible with the country’s pledge to sharply reduce carbon emissions.“If you want to take climate goals seriously then gas is simply an important source of energy,” said Westphal.From the end of 2019 when it’s to go online, the twin pipes of Nord Stream 2 will pump up to 55 billion cubic meters of gas to Western Europe each year, the same as its predecessor Nord Stream 1, which runs from the Russian city of Vyborg under the Baltic to the German city of Greifswald. The additional gas is needed to fill a projected decline in supply from Norway and the Netherlands, as their reserves wane.The aging Ukrainian Gas Transmission System, meanwhile, is a Soviet-era relic in bad need of upgrading and unlikely to be competitive in the foreseeable future. Its loss would be a severe blow to Kyiv, which earns up to 2 billion euros ($2.35 billion) a year from transit fees — some 2 per cent of the country’s gross domestic product.A deal that keeps Kyiv in the mix could help normalize relations between Ukraine and Russia, Moscow and Berlin.“A compromise could be that on the one hand the pipeline project isn’t blocked any further,” said Claudia Kemfert, a senior energy expert at the German Institute for Economic Research. “On the other hand Russia would commit itself to keep using the gas route through Ukraine, so that all sides have a face-saving result.”Merkel’s spokesman Steffen Seibert indicated that some of the gas that passed through Ukraine’s pipes last year — over 90 billion cubic meters — will keep flowing in future.“In the end, but we’re not there yet, it will also be about the volume of gas transiting (through Ukraine),” he said.“Of course it makes a difference how many billion cubic meters it is. But I can’t give you a target number. We believe it needs to be resolved in talks and we hope that, piece by piece, things will move forward.”___Jordans reported from Berlin.last_img read more

Ontarios craft brewers pan Doug Fords buckabeer plan as unaffordable

first_imgMany of Ontario’s craft beer brewers refuse to sacrifice quality and lower their prices to a loonie per can despite the new Progressive Conservative buck-a-beer plan.Instead, consumers may soon be paying more for small-batch suds as brewers adjust to higher prices for cans amid a trade war with Canada’s southern neighbour.“I would argue that no one in Ontario — at least no one in the Ontario craft brewing market — can possibly afford to sell their beer at that price and make … any money,” said Matt Gibson, manager of corporate sales and marketing for Burlington, Ont.-based Nickel Brook Brewing.The brewery’s least expensive product now retails at $3.05, well above the new minimums set to take effect August 27.Premier Doug Ford announced Tuesday his government would lower the minimum price of a bottle or can of beer with an alcohol volume below 5.6 per cent to $1 from $1.25. The provincial government will offer a number of non-financial incentives, like prime spots in Liquor Control Board of Ontario stores and advertising in flyers or inserts, to companies that participate.A number of the province’s craft brewers decried the policy — a highly publicized campaign promise — on social media, saying they could not afford to participate without sacrificing the quality of their product.Nickel Brook Brewing would have to skimp on ingredients, fire some employees to reduce labour costs or accept the product as a loss leader to be able to charge a loonie, said Gibson, adding all three options are non-starters.The sole brewery that will reportedly offer a $1 beer so far is Barley Days Brewery, where Ford made the announcement. It did not immediately respond to a request for comment.It’s unclear how the larger brewers will respond. Molson Coors Canada, the country’s second largest industry player according to a recent report by market-research firm IBISWorld, does not publicly comment on pricing, said spokesman Josh Stewart in an email. The other two largest companies, Anheuser-Busch InBev and Moosehead Breweries, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The government incentives for companies that can afford to participate, like prime shelf space, concern Nickel Brook Brewing and many other craft brewers.The brewery regularly pays thousands of dollars for such benefits and they tend to result in a sales uptick, he said. If Nickel Brook Brewing can’t participate in as many of these programs because they’re being given away, he said, that will inevitably impact sales.Muskoka Brewery, which operates out of Bracebridge, Ont., also can’t lower its prices while maintaining beer quality and paying their employees a living wage, said president Todd Lewin, who added there’s some shock and surprise over how the government plans to roll out the policy.“For sure, it’s a concern that the playing field isn’t level,” he said.Companies like his “invest quite heavily” in participating in those kinds of programs, Lewin said, and seeing others get that space for free “just doesn’t feel very fair.”That’s potentially problematic for an industry already grappling with recent aluminum tariffs.U.S. President Donald Trump imposed a 10 per cent fee on metal imports in early July. That decision resulted in longer wait times for can orders for breweries like Nickle Brook, said Gibson, as larger companies that need cans for their products placed much larger orders.The brewery’s lead time for orders jumped from eight weeks to 20 weeks or more, he said. The company’s been forced to use cans for less popular beers to house its better-selling brews and slap stickers on them indicating what’s inside.“We’re using whatever cans we have on hand right now to keep up with demand,” Gibson said. “If we don’t put cans out, we go out of business.”Some breweries will really struggle over the next couple of months because they’ll be unable to get any product out, he predicted.Higher prices for consumers will start to show up in stores soon, he said, as companies pass on at least part of the increased cost for cans onto beer drinkers.For now, Muskoka Brewery is eating the extra cost, said Lewin.“It’s just something that affects the bottom line,” he said, adding the company reviews its pricing quarterly and will do so again in the fall based on a multitude of factors, including the new aluminum tariff.“I think it’s still up in the air a little bit.”Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.last_img read more

-->

first_imgMany of Ontario’s craft beer brewers refuse to sacrifice quality and lower their prices to a loonie per can despite the new Progressive Conservative buck-a-beer plan.Instead, consumers may soon be paying more for small-batch suds as brewers adjust to higher prices for cans amid a trade war with Canada’s southern neighbour.“I would argue that no one in Ontario — at least no one in the Ontario craft brewing market — can possibly afford to sell their beer at that price and make … any money,” said Matt Gibson, manager of corporate sales and marketing for Burlington, Ont.-based Nickel Brook Brewing.The brewery’s least expensive product now retails at $3.05, well above the new minimums set to take effect August 27.Premier Doug Ford announced Tuesday his government would lower the minimum price of a bottle or can of beer with an alcohol volume below 5.6 per cent to $1 from $1.25. The provincial government will offer a number of non-financial incentives, like prime spots in Liquor Control Board of Ontario stores and advertising in flyers or inserts, to companies that participate.A number of the province’s craft brewers decried the policy — a highly publicized campaign promise — on social media, saying they could not afford to participate without sacrificing the quality of their product.Nickel Brook Brewing would have to skimp on ingredients, fire some employees to reduce labour costs or accept the product as a loss leader to be able to charge a loonie, said Gibson, adding all three options are non-starters.The sole brewery that will reportedly offer a $1 beer so far is Barley Days Brewery, where Ford made the announcement. It did not immediately respond to a request for comment.It’s unclear how the larger brewers will respond. Molson Coors Canada, the country’s second largest industry player according to a recent report by market-research firm IBISWorld, does not publicly comment on pricing, said spokesman Josh Stewart in an email. The other two largest companies, Anheuser-Busch InBev and Moosehead Breweries, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The government incentives for companies that can afford to participate, like prime shelf space, concern Nickel Brook Brewing and many other craft brewers.The brewery regularly pays thousands of dollars for such benefits and they tend to result in a sales uptick, he said. If Nickel Brook Brewing can’t participate in as many of these programs because they’re being given away, he said, that will inevitably impact sales.Muskoka Brewery, which operates out of Bracebridge, Ont., also can’t lower its prices while maintaining beer quality and paying their employees a living wage, said president Todd Lewin, who added there’s some shock and surprise over how the government plans to roll out the policy.“For sure, it’s a concern that the playing field isn’t level,” he said.Companies like his “invest quite heavily” in participating in those kinds of programs, Lewin said, and seeing others get that space for free “just doesn’t feel very fair.”That’s potentially problematic for an industry already grappling with recent aluminum tariffs.U.S. President Donald Trump imposed a 10 per cent fee on metal imports in early July. That decision resulted in longer wait times for can orders for breweries like Nickle Brook, said Gibson, as larger companies that need cans for their products placed much larger orders.The brewery’s lead time for orders jumped from eight weeks to 20 weeks or more, he said. The company’s been forced to use cans for less popular beers to house its better-selling brews and slap stickers on them indicating what’s inside.“We’re using whatever cans we have on hand right now to keep up with demand,” Gibson said. “If we don’t put cans out, we go out of business.”Some breweries will really struggle over the next couple of months because they’ll be unable to get any product out, he predicted.Higher prices for consumers will start to show up in stores soon, he said, as companies pass on at least part of the increased cost for cans onto beer drinkers.For now, Muskoka Brewery is eating the extra cost, said Lewin.“It’s just something that affects the bottom line,” he said, adding the company reviews its pricing quarterly and will do so again in the fall based on a multitude of factors, including the new aluminum tariff.“I think it’s still up in the air a little bit.”Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.last_img read more

Sea reefs and sunsets Living Coral is colour of the year

first_imgNEW YORK — The Pantone Color Institute has chosen Living Coral as its 2019 colour of the year.Company vice-president Laurie Pressman told The Associated Press ahead of Wednesday’s announcement that Living Coral has a saturated orange base with a golden undertone. She calls the colour “convivial,” warm, welcoming, versatile and life-affirming. Last year’s pick was the vivacious Ultra Violet.Pantone’s colour experts scour the globe in search of colour trends leading to its top choice. Living Coral is Pantone’s 20th colour of the year.Leanne Italie, The Associated Presslast_img read more

-->

first_imgNEW YORK — The Pantone Color Institute has chosen Living Coral as its 2019 colour of the year.Company vice-president Laurie Pressman told The Associated Press ahead of Wednesday’s announcement that Living Coral has a saturated orange base with a golden undertone. She calls the colour “convivial,” warm, welcoming, versatile and life-affirming. Last year’s pick was the vivacious Ultra Violet.Pantone’s colour experts scour the globe in search of colour trends leading to its top choice. Living Coral is Pantone’s 20th colour of the year.Leanne Italie, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Feds mull competitiveness changes this fall after easing carbon tax thresholds

first_imgMorneau’s office has been studying a number of different options – but it has yet to promise that it will make any changes at all.Last week, following months of consultations, Ottawa scaled down its carbon pricing plan for heavy industrial emitters with the aim of reducing greenhouse gas production without driving firms from Canada altogether.Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says companies told Ottawa the initial plan announced last winter was too onerous.Business associations have called on Ottawa to cut corporate taxes in Canada. They’ve argued the U.S. tax changes could end up inflicting more damage on the Canadian economy than would the possible termination of North American Free Trade Agreement. OTTAWA, O.N. – The federal Finance Department says changes could be on the way this fall to address Corporate Canada’s competitiveness fears in a week that has already seen Ottawa take steps to help some businesses avoid losing an edge due to the Liberals’ controversial carbon pricing plan.A spokeswoman for Bill Morneau says the finance minister been spending the summer listening to a wide range of perspectives on Canada’s competitiveness challenges and, if he is to make any adjustments, they would be announced in his fall economic statement.For months, the business community has fired off numerous warnings to Ottawa that recent changes _ such as major corporate tax reforms in the United States – have put the country at a deep disadvantage.last_img read more

-->

first_imgMorneau’s office has been studying a number of different options – but it has yet to promise that it will make any changes at all.Last week, following months of consultations, Ottawa scaled down its carbon pricing plan for heavy industrial emitters with the aim of reducing greenhouse gas production without driving firms from Canada altogether.Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says companies told Ottawa the initial plan announced last winter was too onerous.Business associations have called on Ottawa to cut corporate taxes in Canada. They’ve argued the U.S. tax changes could end up inflicting more damage on the Canadian economy than would the possible termination of North American Free Trade Agreement. OTTAWA, O.N. – The federal Finance Department says changes could be on the way this fall to address Corporate Canada’s competitiveness fears in a week that has already seen Ottawa take steps to help some businesses avoid losing an edge due to the Liberals’ controversial carbon pricing plan.A spokeswoman for Bill Morneau says the finance minister been spending the summer listening to a wide range of perspectives on Canada’s competitiveness challenges and, if he is to make any adjustments, they would be announced in his fall economic statement.For months, the business community has fired off numerous warnings to Ottawa that recent changes _ such as major corporate tax reforms in the United States – have put the country at a deep disadvantage.last_img read more

Northern Development Initiative Trust elects first female chair and allfemale executive committee

first_imgNew members to the Board include Lori Ackerman, Margo Wagner, and Carol Leclerc.Ackerman will be serving as Vice-Chair, Wagner as Board Chair, and Leclerc as Director at Large.Wendy Benyk is serving as finance committee chair for a second term.CEO of Northern Development Initiative Trust, Joel McKay, says he would like to congratulate Wagner on becoming the Board’s first female chair.“I want to congratulate Chair Wagner on her election as Chair of the Trust’s Board of Directors and as the first female to sit at the head of the director’s table. I admire Chair Wagner’s commitment to the people and causes that impact the north and look forward to working together with her and the rest of our executive team.”Northern Development is an independent regional economic development corporation focused on stimulating economic growth and job creation in Central and Northern British Columbia. PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. – The Northern Development Initiative Trust has announced the acclimation of three new executive members to its board of directors.According to the Trust, for the first time since its inception, the board has a female chair and an all-female executive committee.These new executive members were elected at the Trust’s Annual General Meeting on April 24, 2019.last_img read more

-->

first_imgNew members to the Board include Lori Ackerman, Margo Wagner, and Carol Leclerc.Ackerman will be serving as Vice-Chair, Wagner as Board Chair, and Leclerc as Director at Large.Wendy Benyk is serving as finance committee chair for a second term.CEO of Northern Development Initiative Trust, Joel McKay, says he would like to congratulate Wagner on becoming the Board’s first female chair.“I want to congratulate Chair Wagner on her election as Chair of the Trust’s Board of Directors and as the first female to sit at the head of the director’s table. I admire Chair Wagner’s commitment to the people and causes that impact the north and look forward to working together with her and the rest of our executive team.”Northern Development is an independent regional economic development corporation focused on stimulating economic growth and job creation in Central and Northern British Columbia. PRINCE GEORGE, B.C. – The Northern Development Initiative Trust has announced the acclimation of three new executive members to its board of directors.According to the Trust, for the first time since its inception, the board has a female chair and an all-female executive committee.These new executive members were elected at the Trust’s Annual General Meeting on April 24, 2019.last_img read more

Guns snares bulldozers

first_imgThe biggest killers of wildlife globally are unsustainable hunting and harvesting, and the conversion of huge swathes of natural habitat into farms, housing estates, roads, and other industrial activities. There is little doubt that these threats are driving the current mass extinction crisis. Yet our understanding of where these threats overlap with the locations of sensitive species has been poor. This limits our ability to target conservation efforts to the most important places. Also Read – A special kind of bondIn our new study, published today in Plos Biology, we mapped 15 of the most harmful human threats – including hunting and land clearing – within the locations of 5,457 threatened mammals, birds and amphibians globally. We found that 1,237 species – a quarter of those assessed – are impacted by threats that cover more than 90 per cent of their distributions. These species include many large, charismatic mammals such as lions and elephants. Most concerningly of all, we identified 395 species that are impacted by threats across 100 per cent of their range. Also Read – Insider threat management Mapping the risks We only mapped threats within a species location if those threats are known to specifically endanger that species. For example, the African lion is threatened by urbanisation, hunting and trapping, so we only quantified the overlap of those specific hazards for this species. This allowed us to determine the parts of a species’ home range that are impacted by threats and, conversely, the parts that are free of threats and therefore serve as refuges. We could then identify global hotspots of human impacts on threatened species, as well as “coolspots” where species are largely threat-free. The fact that so many species face threats across almost all of their range has grave consequences. These species are likely to continue to decline and possibly die out in the impacted parts of their ranges. Completely impacted species certainly face extinction without targeted conservation action. Conversely, we found more than 1,000 species that were not impacted by human threats at all. Although this is positive news, it is important to note that we have not mapped every possible threat, so our results likely underestimate the true impact. For example, we didn’t account for diseases, which are a major threat to amphibians, or climate change, which is a major threat to virtually all species. Hotspots and coolspots We produced the first global map of human impacts on threatened species by combining the parts of each species range that are exposed to threats. The overwhelmingly dominant global hotspot for human impacts on threatened species is Southeast Asia. This region contains the top five countries with the most threats to species. These include Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia, and Myanmar. The most impacted ecosystems include mangroves and tropical forests, which concerningly are home to the greatest diversity of life on Earth. We also created a global map of coolspots by combining the parts of species ranges that are free from human threats. This map identifies the last vestiges of wild places where threatened species have shelter from the ravages of guns, snares, and bulldozers. As such, these are crucial conservation strongholds. Coolspots include parts of the Amazon rainforest, the Andes, the eastern Himalayas, and the forests of Liberia in West Africa. In many places, coolspots are located near hotspots. This makes sense because in species-rich areas it is likely that many animals are impacted whereas many others are not, due to their varying sensitivity to different threats. What next? There is room for optimism because all the threats we map can be stopped by conservation action. But we need to make sure this action is directed to priority areas, and that it has enough financial and political support. An obvious first step is to secure threat-free refuges for particular species, via actions such as protected areas, which are paramount for their survival. To ensure the survival of highly impacted species with little or no access to refuges, “active threat management” is needed to open enough viable habitat for them to survive. For example, tiger numbers in Nepal have doubled since 2009, mainly as a result of targeted anti-poaching efforts. Tackling threats and protecting refuges are complementary approaches that will be most effective if carried out simultaneously. Our study provides information that can help guide these efforts and help to make national and global conservation plans as successful as possible. (The authors of this article are James Allan, Christopher O’Bryan, and James Watson. They acknowledge the contributions of Hugh Possingham, Oscar Venter, Moreno Di Marco and Scott Consaul Atkinson to the research on which this article is based. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Views are personal)last_img read more

-->

first_imgThe biggest killers of wildlife globally are unsustainable hunting and harvesting, and the conversion of huge swathes of natural habitat into farms, housing estates, roads, and other industrial activities. There is little doubt that these threats are driving the current mass extinction crisis. Yet our understanding of where these threats overlap with the locations of sensitive species has been poor. This limits our ability to target conservation efforts to the most important places. Also Read – A special kind of bondIn our new study, published today in Plos Biology, we mapped 15 of the most harmful human threats – including hunting and land clearing – within the locations of 5,457 threatened mammals, birds and amphibians globally. We found that 1,237 species – a quarter of those assessed – are impacted by threats that cover more than 90 per cent of their distributions. These species include many large, charismatic mammals such as lions and elephants. Most concerningly of all, we identified 395 species that are impacted by threats across 100 per cent of their range. Also Read – Insider threat management Mapping the risks We only mapped threats within a species location if those threats are known to specifically endanger that species. For example, the African lion is threatened by urbanisation, hunting and trapping, so we only quantified the overlap of those specific hazards for this species. This allowed us to determine the parts of a species’ home range that are impacted by threats and, conversely, the parts that are free of threats and therefore serve as refuges. We could then identify global hotspots of human impacts on threatened species, as well as “coolspots” where species are largely threat-free. The fact that so many species face threats across almost all of their range has grave consequences. These species are likely to continue to decline and possibly die out in the impacted parts of their ranges. Completely impacted species certainly face extinction without targeted conservation action. Conversely, we found more than 1,000 species that were not impacted by human threats at all. Although this is positive news, it is important to note that we have not mapped every possible threat, so our results likely underestimate the true impact. For example, we didn’t account for diseases, which are a major threat to amphibians, or climate change, which is a major threat to virtually all species. Hotspots and coolspots We produced the first global map of human impacts on threatened species by combining the parts of each species range that are exposed to threats. The overwhelmingly dominant global hotspot for human impacts on threatened species is Southeast Asia. This region contains the top five countries with the most threats to species. These include Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia, and Myanmar. The most impacted ecosystems include mangroves and tropical forests, which concerningly are home to the greatest diversity of life on Earth. We also created a global map of coolspots by combining the parts of species ranges that are free from human threats. This map identifies the last vestiges of wild places where threatened species have shelter from the ravages of guns, snares, and bulldozers. As such, these are crucial conservation strongholds. Coolspots include parts of the Amazon rainforest, the Andes, the eastern Himalayas, and the forests of Liberia in West Africa. In many places, coolspots are located near hotspots. This makes sense because in species-rich areas it is likely that many animals are impacted whereas many others are not, due to their varying sensitivity to different threats. What next? There is room for optimism because all the threats we map can be stopped by conservation action. But we need to make sure this action is directed to priority areas, and that it has enough financial and political support. An obvious first step is to secure threat-free refuges for particular species, via actions such as protected areas, which are paramount for their survival. To ensure the survival of highly impacted species with little or no access to refuges, “active threat management” is needed to open enough viable habitat for them to survive. For example, tiger numbers in Nepal have doubled since 2009, mainly as a result of targeted anti-poaching efforts. Tackling threats and protecting refuges are complementary approaches that will be most effective if carried out simultaneously. Our study provides information that can help guide these efforts and help to make national and global conservation plans as successful as possible. (The authors of this article are James Allan, Christopher O’Bryan, and James Watson. They acknowledge the contributions of Hugh Possingham, Oscar Venter, Moreno Di Marco and Scott Consaul Atkinson to the research on which this article is based. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Views are personal)last_img read more

Mamata calls for paribartan to rid nation of fear psychosis induced by

first_imgKolkata: Trinamool Congress supremo Mamata Banerjee on Tuesday called for paribartan (change) of guard at the Centre to get rid of the fear psychosis, particularly among the business community, which the Narendra Modi government has induced in the country.”There was a time when the people of the country loved the leader of their nation. But now people are apprehensive about the leader. This situation prevailing in the country needs a change. If this happens, I assure you that the business community and the industrialists will not face any problem. Communities like the Marwaris and the Punjabis will be able to live peacefully. We will work together and bring a new policy to ensure that you do not suffer from any harassment,” Banerjee said at a Holi celebration event organised by the International Marwari Federation. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaIn a word of advice to the business community, Banerjee reiterated that till they (BJP) are in power at the Centre, they should be alert and careful. “The businessmen are scared as agencies like the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI), I-T (Income Tax) and Enforcement Directorate (ED) are being set against them,” she maintained. Meanwhile, the Chief Minister lashed out at BJP for questioning her religion and threw a Sanskrit mantra chanting challenge to Prime Minister Narendra Modi and BJP president Amit Shah. “Puja does not only mean sporting a tilak, Amit (Shah) babu and Modi babu (PM Modi). Come have a competition of mantras with me. Let’s see who knows more Sanskrit mantras,” she said. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highway”They allege we do not allow Pujas in Bengal. They should go and see how many ‘mandirs’ (temples) have been constructed. Humanity is my religion and I do not need lectures from them about religion,” she added. Providing a list of the shrines that have received a facelift during her government’s rule, she said that the state government has recently inaugurated a skywalk at Dakshineshwar. Tarakeshwar and Tarapith have been developed and Gangasagar has witnessed a total overhaul. “People used to say ‘Sab tirtha barbar, Gangasagar ekbar’. Now they say ‘Gangasagar barbar’. They have failed in building the Ram Mandir and simply engage in political rhetoric over it before elections,” Banerjee said. Continuing her tirade against the saffron party, she asserted that she believes in playing Holi with colours “unlike some sections (BJP) which believe in paying with blood”. “I believe in playing Holi with colours and with a pure mind, unlike them who believe in playing Holi with the blood of others. I do not need to learn the meaning of communal harmony from a divisive force like the BJP,” Banerjee said. She urged the people of the state to maintain communal harmony on the days of ‘Doljatra’ (as the festival of colours is known in Bengal) and Holi and cautioned people to be on guard against any effort to disturb peace in the state.last_img read more

-->

first_imgKolkata: Trinamool Congress supremo Mamata Banerjee on Tuesday called for paribartan (change) of guard at the Centre to get rid of the fear psychosis, particularly among the business community, which the Narendra Modi government has induced in the country.”There was a time when the people of the country loved the leader of their nation. But now people are apprehensive about the leader. This situation prevailing in the country needs a change. If this happens, I assure you that the business community and the industrialists will not face any problem. Communities like the Marwaris and the Punjabis will be able to live peacefully. We will work together and bring a new policy to ensure that you do not suffer from any harassment,” Banerjee said at a Holi celebration event organised by the International Marwari Federation. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaIn a word of advice to the business community, Banerjee reiterated that till they (BJP) are in power at the Centre, they should be alert and careful. “The businessmen are scared as agencies like the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI), I-T (Income Tax) and Enforcement Directorate (ED) are being set against them,” she maintained. Meanwhile, the Chief Minister lashed out at BJP for questioning her religion and threw a Sanskrit mantra chanting challenge to Prime Minister Narendra Modi and BJP president Amit Shah. “Puja does not only mean sporting a tilak, Amit (Shah) babu and Modi babu (PM Modi). Come have a competition of mantras with me. Let’s see who knows more Sanskrit mantras,” she said. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highway”They allege we do not allow Pujas in Bengal. They should go and see how many ‘mandirs’ (temples) have been constructed. Humanity is my religion and I do not need lectures from them about religion,” she added. Providing a list of the shrines that have received a facelift during her government’s rule, she said that the state government has recently inaugurated a skywalk at Dakshineshwar. Tarakeshwar and Tarapith have been developed and Gangasagar has witnessed a total overhaul. “People used to say ‘Sab tirtha barbar, Gangasagar ekbar’. Now they say ‘Gangasagar barbar’. They have failed in building the Ram Mandir and simply engage in political rhetoric over it before elections,” Banerjee said. Continuing her tirade against the saffron party, she asserted that she believes in playing Holi with colours “unlike some sections (BJP) which believe in paying with blood”. “I believe in playing Holi with colours and with a pure mind, unlike them who believe in playing Holi with the blood of others. I do not need to learn the meaning of communal harmony from a divisive force like the BJP,” Banerjee said. She urged the people of the state to maintain communal harmony on the days of ‘Doljatra’ (as the festival of colours is known in Bengal) and Holi and cautioned people to be on guard against any effort to disturb peace in the state.last_img read more

Samsung Galaxy Fold launch postponed in China

first_imgHong Kong: Samsung has postponed the Galaxy Fold’s launch events in Hong Kong and Shanghai, which were originally scheduled for April 23 and 24, days after some units of the $2,000 foldable phone encountered major display issues. “The firm is blaming the decision on a last minute issue with the venue, according to someone claiming to be familiar with the matter. “But that seems a little too convenient seeing as the handset has been under heavy fire all week, after a number of units broke after being in the hands of reviewers for less than a day,” the SamMobile reported late on Sunday. Tech reviewers from renowned media brands like The Verge and the CNBC noted issues like screen flickering, display distortion and unexplainable bulges bugging the industry-first device, reports said last week. The handset maker obviously doesn’t want to associate these delays with the broken review units, but given the timing, chances are Samsung wants to buy more time to address these issues before the next wave of shipments, according to the Engadget. Sub-titling the review “Yikes”, The Verge said that the flaws were “distressing to be discovered just two days after receiving the review unit”. Defending its devices just days before its roll-out, a Samsung spokesperson assured that the firm would “thoroughly inspect” the units. The super-expensive foldable smartphone was launched during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona in February followed by Huawei launching its own foldable phone, the Mate X. According to market research firm Gartner, foldable phones would make up 5 per cent of high-end phones sales by 2023 with around 30 million units. The phone comes with the world’s first 7.3-inch Infinity Flex Display, which folds into a compact device with a cover display that is capable of opening up to three active apps simultaneously on the main display. The Galaxy Fold is expected to be priced around Rs 1,40,790 in India.last_img read more

-->

first_imgHong Kong: Samsung has postponed the Galaxy Fold’s launch events in Hong Kong and Shanghai, which were originally scheduled for April 23 and 24, days after some units of the $2,000 foldable phone encountered major display issues. “The firm is blaming the decision on a last minute issue with the venue, according to someone claiming to be familiar with the matter. “But that seems a little too convenient seeing as the handset has been under heavy fire all week, after a number of units broke after being in the hands of reviewers for less than a day,” the SamMobile reported late on Sunday. Tech reviewers from renowned media brands like The Verge and the CNBC noted issues like screen flickering, display distortion and unexplainable bulges bugging the industry-first device, reports said last week. The handset maker obviously doesn’t want to associate these delays with the broken review units, but given the timing, chances are Samsung wants to buy more time to address these issues before the next wave of shipments, according to the Engadget. Sub-titling the review “Yikes”, The Verge said that the flaws were “distressing to be discovered just two days after receiving the review unit”. Defending its devices just days before its roll-out, a Samsung spokesperson assured that the firm would “thoroughly inspect” the units. The super-expensive foldable smartphone was launched during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona in February followed by Huawei launching its own foldable phone, the Mate X. According to market research firm Gartner, foldable phones would make up 5 per cent of high-end phones sales by 2023 with around 30 million units. The phone comes with the world’s first 7.3-inch Infinity Flex Display, which folds into a compact device with a cover display that is capable of opening up to three active apps simultaneously on the main display. The Galaxy Fold is expected to be priced around Rs 1,40,790 in India.last_img read more

HC reserves verdict on petition seeking stay on Lucknow poll

first_imgLucknow: The Allahabad High Court on Tuesday reserved its verdict on a petition seeking stay on election to Lucknow Lok Sabha constituency till the name of Naitik Party candidate is included in the list of contestants. The petition, filed by Naitik Party which also demanded Rs 1 lakh compensation from the Election Commission, was heard by the high court’s Lucknow bench of justices PK Jaiswal and Rajnish Kumar. The petitioner alleged that nomination of its candidate was “improperly rejected by the returning officer (Lucknow district magistrate) for favouring another candidate (Union Home Minister) Rajnath Singh on caste consideration”. Polling in 14 seats in Uttar Pradesh including Lucknow is scheduled for May 6 in the fifth phase of Lok Sabha elections.last_img read more

-->

first_imgLucknow: The Allahabad High Court on Tuesday reserved its verdict on a petition seeking stay on election to Lucknow Lok Sabha constituency till the name of Naitik Party candidate is included in the list of contestants. The petition, filed by Naitik Party which also demanded Rs 1 lakh compensation from the Election Commission, was heard by the high court’s Lucknow bench of justices PK Jaiswal and Rajnish Kumar. The petitioner alleged that nomination of its candidate was “improperly rejected by the returning officer (Lucknow district magistrate) for favouring another candidate (Union Home Minister) Rajnath Singh on caste consideration”. Polling in 14 seats in Uttar Pradesh including Lucknow is scheduled for May 6 in the fifth phase of Lok Sabha elections.last_img read more

Moroccans react to Algerias decision to severe its diplomatic ties with

first_imgRabat- There has been still no official reaction from the Moroccan government to the Algeria’s decision to freeze its diplomatic relations with Morocco. But some Moroccan officials said that the decision made the Algerian government translate their disarray and disorientation because of Morocco’s diplomatic success regarding the Sahara dispute over the past two months. “The Diplomatic offensives carried out by Morocco in 2013 have dealt a blow to Algeria, which finds itself disoriented by these successes to the point that the Algerian spokesman of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs expressed this Sunday his country’s decision to severe its ties with the kingdom,” a Moroccan official was quoted by Moroccan French language portal Le 360.ma as saying.  The Algerian government justified its decision by what it called the “scandalous” sentence handed by the Casablanca tribunal to the Moroccan man who tore the Algerian flag. But Moroccans say that this event is used by Algeria just an excuse that translates its frustration to see Morocco achieving diplomatic successes on multiples fronts, including in Africa. “It is clear that the Algerians react in this manner after their failure to push the European Parliament to refuse the signing of a fishing agreement with Morocco, and Morocco’s successful attempt to play a pivotal role in stabilizing Mali,” Dr. Mohamed Chtatou, Professor at University Mohammed V in Rabat, told MWN. “In addition to that, the Algerians are annoyed by the successful visit of King Mohammed VI to the United States and his meeting with President Barack Obama, after which the American head of State pledged his support to a mutually agreed-upon and political solution to the Sahara conflict,” he added. For her part Karima Rhanem, a Moroccan Researcher in Governance & Public Policy, expressed her disbelief to see that the Algerian government decided to freeze its ties with Morocco using the excuse of the verdict of the Casablanca tribunal against the Moroccan who tore the Algerian flag. “I am very surprised to hear this decision. I am even surprised it was a reaction to the Moroccan court verdict regarding the Moroccan who took down the Algerian flag. Neither the Moroccan government nor another foreign entity could interfere in the court decision and this should be clear to our neighbors,” she said. “Right after this incident, we saw several Algerians setting fire on the Moroccan flag. Yet, the Moroccan government didn’t freeze its relations,” she noted. Karima, who has traveled several times to the Maghreb region and works to reinforce the cultural, economic and fraternal ties that binds the countries of the Maghreb, called on Algerian officials to “rethink their strategies before dragging the two countries and the region into a useless cold war.”“Regardless of the current tension between the two countries, intellectuals from Morocco and Algeria are calling for reinforcing these ties and ending this artificial conflict. I call on the Algerian Government to hold back this unprecedented decision before leading both countries into a useless cold war,” she said.“The Algerian and Moroccan people’s will to sustain partnership and friendship ties should not be undermined by this decision. People of the two countries need more economic prosperity, need cultural partnership, employment opportunities, social justice, a unified Maghreb rather than an endless conflict,” she concluded. © Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or or redistributelast_img read more

-->

first_imgRabat- There has been still no official reaction from the Moroccan government to the Algeria’s decision to freeze its diplomatic relations with Morocco. But some Moroccan officials said that the decision made the Algerian government translate their disarray and disorientation because of Morocco’s diplomatic success regarding the Sahara dispute over the past two months. “The Diplomatic offensives carried out by Morocco in 2013 have dealt a blow to Algeria, which finds itself disoriented by these successes to the point that the Algerian spokesman of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs expressed this Sunday his country’s decision to severe its ties with the kingdom,” a Moroccan official was quoted by Moroccan French language portal Le 360.ma as saying.  The Algerian government justified its decision by what it called the “scandalous” sentence handed by the Casablanca tribunal to the Moroccan man who tore the Algerian flag. But Moroccans say that this event is used by Algeria just an excuse that translates its frustration to see Morocco achieving diplomatic successes on multiples fronts, including in Africa. “It is clear that the Algerians react in this manner after their failure to push the European Parliament to refuse the signing of a fishing agreement with Morocco, and Morocco’s successful attempt to play a pivotal role in stabilizing Mali,” Dr. Mohamed Chtatou, Professor at University Mohammed V in Rabat, told MWN. “In addition to that, the Algerians are annoyed by the successful visit of King Mohammed VI to the United States and his meeting with President Barack Obama, after which the American head of State pledged his support to a mutually agreed-upon and political solution to the Sahara conflict,” he added. For her part Karima Rhanem, a Moroccan Researcher in Governance & Public Policy, expressed her disbelief to see that the Algerian government decided to freeze its ties with Morocco using the excuse of the verdict of the Casablanca tribunal against the Moroccan who tore the Algerian flag. “I am very surprised to hear this decision. I am even surprised it was a reaction to the Moroccan court verdict regarding the Moroccan who took down the Algerian flag. Neither the Moroccan government nor another foreign entity could interfere in the court decision and this should be clear to our neighbors,” she said. “Right after this incident, we saw several Algerians setting fire on the Moroccan flag. Yet, the Moroccan government didn’t freeze its relations,” she noted. Karima, who has traveled several times to the Maghreb region and works to reinforce the cultural, economic and fraternal ties that binds the countries of the Maghreb, called on Algerian officials to “rethink their strategies before dragging the two countries and the region into a useless cold war.”“Regardless of the current tension between the two countries, intellectuals from Morocco and Algeria are calling for reinforcing these ties and ending this artificial conflict. I call on the Algerian Government to hold back this unprecedented decision before leading both countries into a useless cold war,” she said.“The Algerian and Moroccan people’s will to sustain partnership and friendship ties should not be undermined by this decision. People of the two countries need more economic prosperity, need cultural partnership, employment opportunities, social justice, a unified Maghreb rather than an endless conflict,” she concluded. © Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or or redistributelast_img read more

Moroccan relief airlifted for Palestinian people continues

Al-Ismailia (Egypt)  –  Three other planes of the Royal Armed Forces (FAR), carrying humanitarian aid for Palestinians, arrived on Sunday at the Egyptian military airport of Al-Ismailia (140 km from Cairo) as part of the Moroccan airlift, upon the orders of HM King Mohammed VI, to alleviate the sufferings of populations who are facing a barbaric Israeli offensive.Each plane is loaded with 13.5 tons of relief mobilized by the Moroccan Agency for International Cooperation and the Mohammed V Foundation for Solidarity, said Moroccan deputy ambassador to Cairo Ahmed Ait Issa. This aid includes rice (7,500 kg), powdered milk (2,400 kg), medical equipment (wheelchairs, beds..) and hygiene products.The Royal Armed Forces will operate 12 fights from Aug.16 to 20 to airlift this relief from the Kenitra military base to the Al-Ismailia airport in Egypt, while the Egyptian Red Crescent will transport it by land to the Gaza Strip via the Rafah border post, he added. Hamid Mohamed Hamid from the Egyptian Red Crescent said that the operation of dispatching and handing the Moroccan aid for Palestinians took place in coordination with the Moroccan embassy. The Egyptian Red Crescent will carry the aid and hand it to its Palestinian counterpart which will distribute it, he said. read more

-->

Al-Ismailia (Egypt)  –  Three other planes of the Royal Armed Forces (FAR), carrying humanitarian aid for Palestinians, arrived on Sunday at the Egyptian military airport of Al-Ismailia (140 km from Cairo) as part of the Moroccan airlift, upon the orders of HM King Mohammed VI, to alleviate the sufferings of populations who are facing a barbaric Israeli offensive.Each plane is loaded with 13.5 tons of relief mobilized by the Moroccan Agency for International Cooperation and the Mohammed V Foundation for Solidarity, said Moroccan deputy ambassador to Cairo Ahmed Ait Issa. This aid includes rice (7,500 kg), powdered milk (2,400 kg), medical equipment (wheelchairs, beds..) and hygiene products.The Royal Armed Forces will operate 12 fights from Aug.16 to 20 to airlift this relief from the Kenitra military base to the Al-Ismailia airport in Egypt, while the Egyptian Red Crescent will transport it by land to the Gaza Strip via the Rafah border post, he added. Hamid Mohamed Hamid from the Egyptian Red Crescent said that the operation of dispatching and handing the Moroccan aid for Palestinians took place in coordination with the Moroccan embassy. The Egyptian Red Crescent will carry the aid and hand it to its Palestinian counterpart which will distribute it, he said. read more