Retired Easton Bishop Sorge dies in Colorado

first_imgRetired Easton Bishop Sorge dies in Colorado Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By ENS staffPosted Dec 7, 2011 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 People Featured Jobs & Calls Jerry Hames says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET December 14, 2011 at 1:00 pm Elliot, together with Bishop John MacNaughton, were two members of the communications committee of Executive Council when I began work in 1990 as editor of the “new” Episcopal Life, successor to The Episcopalian. Because of this, he was much involved in the month-by-month early development of the publication and I valued immensely both his experience and support for the publication as the staff weaved its way through bureaucratic minefields, such as the theat of a General Convention boycott in Arizona in 1991. Comments (6) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Comments are closed. Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET December 8, 2011 at 5:30 pm Bishop Sorge was my first executive at the Episcopal Church Center. It was a joy to work him on Education for Mission and Ministry Unit. His vision of networks to serve dioceses in order that they would serve parishes served the Church for many years. Those were exciting times. I give thanks for his life and ministry. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY November 6, 2014 at 11:15 am Living now in the UK, I have only just seen the notice of Rev Elliot Sorge’s passing. I met him and his wife and family when I was a young UNA agronomist volunteer working in Brazil from 1966 -68 for Catholic Relief Services. I attended the Episcopal church where he was the minister in Belem in the north of Brasil at the mouth of the Amazon. Both he and his wife Marjorie were extremely kind to me at that time, welcoming me into their home for meals. I hope if Marjorie still survives hime she may receive these comments. They were a very kind couple all those years ago to me a Scots volunteer working in Brazil. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Rev. Ann Fontaine says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Episcopal News Service] The Rt. Rev. Elliot L. Sorge, eighth bishop of the Diocese of Easton, died Dec. 6 in Centennial, Colorado. He was 82.Funeral services will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 10 at St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Centennial. Sorge and his wife, Marjorie, were living in Centennial, a suburb of Denver. A memorial will be held in Easton early in 2012.Bishop Sorge was the bishop of South Central Brazil (1971-1977) and of Easton (1983-1993). He served on the staff of the Episcopal Church Center in New York as officer for the development of ministry, beginning in 1977. Under his tenure, the unit underwent an extensive reorganization and operated through a series of networks that served parish needs in evangelism, education, youth ministries and lay development, and the wider church through deployment and seminary coordination, according to a Diocesan Press Service story about his election in Easton.Sorge was elected on the first ballot April 30, 1983 at the cathedral in Easton, the see city of the diocese on the eastern shore of Maryland. He succeeded the Rt. Rev. W. Moultrie Moore.A native of Indiana, Sorge was a graduate of De Pauw University and Seabury-Western Theological Seminary. He served missions and parishes in Ellendale, Fargo and Oakes, North Dakota from his ordination in 1954 until he went to Brazil as a missionary 10 years later.He was elected bishop of the newly created Diocese of South-Central Brazil in the Igreja Episcopal do Brasil and was consecrated in Sao Paulo on Jan. 31, 1971. He served until 1977.In addition to his wife, Sorge is survived by three children, Brian D. Sorge, the Rev. Marianne Sorge Ell, and Ruth L. Sorge. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group virginia Dauncey Garman says: Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ December 7, 2011 at 10:50 pm I feel honored to have known and worked with Eliot, one of the most dynamic, energetic, and creative church leaders in recent Episcopal Church history. He had a remarkable ability to envision innovative approaches to planning and pursuing mission—both domestic and overseas. His unique ability was to cut through administrative layers and strata, enabling the “folks” to be just as influential as the “people.” Not always understood , Eliot was sometimes perceived by traditionalists and ecclesiastical powerbrokers as a “maverick” who threatened their cosy, safe and familiar institution (as, of course was Jesus) but his ideas live on in the careers of many clergy friends who were profoundly influenced and highly rewarded by his friendship. A loving family -minded person, Eliot’s wife and daughters were always the center of his life. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Rev. John T. Docker says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Rev. Dr. Robert R. Hansel says: Michael Tuckwell says: Obituary, December 9, 2011 at 5:32 pm Marge and Family,I was so sorry to hear of Elliot’s death.He was such a special person to St. Mary Magdalene in Seven Lakes. Without his vision, help and friendship our small church would not have been able to grow.My first husband Roger Dauncey and Elliot became good friends as they looked for land to some day built a church. Elliot was a great comfort to Roger in the last weeks before his death.Since you left St Mary Magdalene’s the congregation has bought a store front building along Seven Lakes drive. all of this would not have been possible with out Elliot’s vision.I have fond memories of our times with Elliot and the parking lot coffee hours when we started St. Mary Magdalene in the Chapel at Seven Lakes.I will keep you in my prayers.Virginia Dauncey Garman Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing December 8, 2011 at 9:52 am Rise in glory good and faithful servant. Maybe it is time to re-visit his brilliant use of networks. Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more

Diocese of Rhode Island chooses five to stand for bishop…

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Elections, Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL House of Bishops Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Robert L. Campbell says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Morris Post says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Diocese of Rhode Island chooses five to stand for bishop election Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (2) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island’s Search and Nomination Committee has selected five priests to stand for election as the 13th bishop of Rhode Island.The announcement was made March 10 during the diocese’s annual convocation.The preliminary slate consists of:* the Rev. Kurt Dunkle, 50, rector, Grace Episcopal Church, Orange Park, Florida (Diocese of Florida);* the Rev. Cathy George, 55, currently on a writing sabbatical; former priest-in-charge, St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Dorchester, Massachusetts (Diocese of Massachusetts);* the Very Rev. Nicholas Knisely, 51, dean, Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, Phoenix, Arizona (Diocese of Arizona);* the Rev. Ledlie Laughlin, 52, rector, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Diocese of Pennsylvania); and* the Rev. Jennifer Pedrick, 45, rector, Church of the Epiphany, Rumford, Rhode Island (Diocese of Rhode Island).A Nominee Profiles booklet features the nominees’ autobiographies and their answers to four essay questions posed by the Search and Nomination Committee. All the nominees will visit the diocese May 11-12, including an all-day public event on May 12, at St. Andrew’s School in Barrington, where they will make remarks and answer questions from lay and clergy attendees, according to a press release.Announcement of the slate opened a petition nomination process that closes at 5 p.m. EDT on March 25. Additional information about that process is on the Petition Candidates Resource page of the bishop search website. The process replaces the former custom of allowing nominations from the floor during the electing convention, which the diocesan canons no longer allow.The person elected will succeed Bishop Geralyn Wolf, 64, who has been the diocesan bishop since February 1996.The election will take place June 2, at St. Paul’s Church in Pawtucket. Because the election will occur close in time to the77th meeting of the General Convention of the Episcopal Church in July, Episcopal Church canons provide (in Canon III.11.3)  for the required consents to be sought from the bishops and deputies at convention.Subject to obtaining that consent, the bishop-elect will be ordained as bishop of Rhode Island at a ceremony on Nov. 17, at St. George’s School in Middletown.“The committee members and I spent 2 and a half days in discernment with these priests, and I am very excited about what each of them would bring to the Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island,” said Lora MacFall, committee chair, in the press release. She called that time “the final step in a nine-month process that was centered in prayer and respectful listening and conversation.” Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By ENS staffPosted Mar 12, 2012 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA March 15, 2012 at 10:38 pm “Stand” is more of a British term for elections. American politicians typically run for office, while British politicians “stand”. With the impending closing of the Cathedral in Providence, it won’t be an easy job for a bishop to step into. 50-60 years ago, I think Rhode Island had the highest Episcopal percentage of any state in the U.S. Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC March 15, 2012 at 12:49 pm @TwilaSmith: are you kidding me? I think we all know what “stand” means in this context. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Canada: PWRDF pledges post-Isaac help for Haiti

first_img Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Anglican Journal] The Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund (PWRDF) has pledged $25,000 for relief efforts in Haiti, where at least 24 people have died after tropical storm Isaac hit the Caribbean country on Aug. 24.PWRDF, the relief and development arm of the Anglican Church of Canada, is working with the Lutheran World Federation and other members of the Action by Churches Together (ACT) Alliance, to provide help for thousands who have lost homes, crops and other means of livelihood due to extensive flooding.  The World Health Organization has also reported new outbreaks of cholera in the in the aftermath of the storm.PWRDF is not launching a special appeal for the victims of the storm, but Canadian Anglicans who wish to donate may do so by writing a check marked “For Haiti relief,” and mailing it to: PWRDF, 80 Hayden St., Toronto, ON, M4Y 3G2.For more information on how to donate, contact Jennifer Brown,  PWRDF administrative associate, at 416-924-9192  ext. 355  or  at 1-866-308-7973.Flood victims will be provided with hygiene kits, cholera medicine and prevention, as well as livelihood support.Areas affected by the storm include those that are still recovering from the 2010 earthquake, said an ACT Alliance report. “Livelihoods in highly vulnerable rural areas have been lost, and the affected communities have limited capacity to recover without external support,” it added.NBC News quoted a report from Haiti’s Civil Protection Office that most of the casualties were from the southeastern and western parts of the country. The death toll is likely to increase, it added.Tropical storm Isaac has also caused severe flooding in New Orleans and other areas in Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi, in the United States. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canada: PWRDF pledges post-Isaac help for Haiti Rector Martinsville, VA By Anglican Journal staffPosted Aug 31, 2012 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Haiti This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Anglican Communion, Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

Anglican chaplains give view on EU vote

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By ACNS staffPosted Jun 8, 2016 Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 EU Referendum Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican chaplains give view on EU vote Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tagscenter_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN [Anglican Communion News Service] The world will be watching when the U.K. votes on whether to stay in the EU later this month. Interventions by President Barack Obama and the heads of the U.S. Federal Reserve and International Monetary Fund, among others, prove this has become a global story. The result will have ramifications for immigration, trade and security beyond Europe’s shores.Anglican clergy across the continent are watching the whirlwind of claims and counter-claims about the impact of a vote to leave. Several chaplains in the Diocese in Europe have been giving ACNS their perspective.The Rev. Ben Harding, from Lyon Anglican Church in France, urged voters to get involved.“Be a part of the decision. Pray it through – weight it up,” he said.  “I’d hope that Christians on the 24th of June can say ‘I have contributed to this decision, having prayed about it, having inquired about it and I have given a good account of my vote’.”The Rev. John Chapman, from St. George’s in Barcelona, said people needed to think longer term and weigh their decisions in that light. His wife, Debbie Chapman, agreed.“It’s a good idea to listen to those who will have to live with the consequences … and not just to listen to ourselves,” she said.The Chapmans said there was considerable interest in the debate in Barcelona as there had been in the Scottish referendum in 2014.  But John Chapman said the people of Spain really could not understand why the U.K. would want to be separate.In the Netherlands, the chaplain of St. James’ Voorschoten, the Rev. Ruan Crew, said there was some sympathy among the Dutch for British people who felt the EU had become too bureaucratic and too powerful. But he said that attitude was tempered with pragmatism.“I would say to people don’t follow the fear agenda,” he said. “Listen to people who have experience of the front line. Part of the defining vision was peace. The Dutch have memories of bombing, invasion and occupation. Nations that trade don’t fight.”The Bishop of Gibraltar in Europe, the Rt. Rev. Robert Innes, said in February it would be sad if the U.K. voted to leave. Last week he told the Church Times that leaving would affect the Church of England’s status and influence within Europe. But he added that there would be a bigger emotional impact – walking away would feel like a divorce which would be met with shock, disbelief and anger.Counting will begin when the polls close at 10 p.m. BST on June 23. It’s thought the outcome should be clear by 4 a.m. on June 24. A chief counting officer will formally announce the result at Manchester Town Hall. Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Anglican Communion, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

Election 2016: Episcopal churches, community partners help educate and register…

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing August 23, 2016 at 3:59 pm Indeed the right to vote by every U.S./American citizen must be honored… and in this Critical time voting rights are being jeopardized across the country and much commendation to those who are facilitating these basic constitutional rights for those precluded/denied for whatever “reason” this basic right… Yet the Scriptural lesson(paraphrased)…What one sows one will reap…” and now we Americans are reaping the bad crop of political leadership in two corrupt individuals notably Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump who each in their own way have forsaken basic values for selfish arrogant material gain… Now we desperately need the Spiritual leadership which is also so lacking across our country. And each of us much search our soul and our conscience as to how to proceed in this Crucial time for the survival and welfare of the most vulnerable in our world–while the U.S. is exercising its military power unfettered resulting in millions (civilians) killed and communities destroyed … Please God May your Spirit be with us all especiallly to those who are in these “power positions” to save or destroy via drones, iron domes, missiles, etc. ad nauseum. Amen. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Maria Villenas from Mi Familia Vota registers residents to vote at Houston’s La Iglesia Episcopal San Pablo. Photo: Paulette E. Martin[Episcopal News Service] Registering voters Aug. 14 at La Iglesia Episcopal San Pablo in Houston was just the start of an Episcopal Diocese of Texas and Mi Familia Vota partnership to help get out the vote.Increased public awareness and interest, possibly due to a contentious election season, sparked the initiative, according to Paulette E. Martin, diocesan communications specialist.“People want to be involved. The whole political arena right now is very important to them,” she told Episcopal News Service recently.“They want to be a part of this,” Martin added. “We figured it would be a good way to educate people and to give them tools to register people to vote, and to encourage their families and friends to help make a difference.”Ten people registered to vote at the event. Others were trained and “deputized” to begin canvassing local communities to help even more residents make their voices heard in the Nov. 8 general election, she said.With an Oct. 11 state voter registration deadline approaching, Carlos Duarte, Mi Familia Vota’s Texas state director, said he hopes to reach additional voters who feel marginalized and who may not have engaged the process in previous years.“With Spanish-speaking communities, they are always torn in participating in the political process because they feel that none of the political parties represents their interests 100 percent,” Duarte said.“They feel that one mirrors their position on abortion while the other agrees with their stand on immigration and acceptance and views for diversity. They are always torn between those options and sometimes that leads to paralysis.”Not so this year, he said.“This year, particularly, the presidential campaign has been so polarized, it’s made them want to get involved.”Mi Familia Vota is a national nonprofit organization with field offices in Arizona, Nevada, California, Colorado, Florida and Texas that “seeks to unite the Latino community and its allies to promote social and economic justice through increased civic participation,” Duarte said.Duarte said the partnership of Mi Familia Vota and the Episcopal Diocese of Texas represents the first time “in five years of doing this, that a church actually approached me to partner with them. Duarte already is planning a subsequent voter registration event with the diocese.“We do a lot of work with churches, but usually we have to go and convince them to get involved, and it’s always very difficult.”Churches are somewhat skittish about political involvement because, as nonprofit organizations, they must adhere to certain guidelines regarding political campaigns or risk losing their Internal Revenue Service nonprofit status, Martin said.But the Episcopal Public Policy Network’s Election Engagement Toolkit “was just one more reason we thought organizing this effort would be a good idea, because we’re not telling people how to vote, we’re just giving them the tools to vote and educating them about it,” she said.The EPPN toolkit, available online with guidelines and resources for church political involvement, cites official church position that “voting is an act of Christian stewardship,” according to the toolkit. The website also invites Episcopalians to sign a pledge that they will vote in the Nov. 8 general election.EPPN is “calling upon congregations to engage in conversation on public policy issues, to develop voter registration and issue education campaigns, and to advocate for protection of voting rights.”“There are a lot of productive and good things that churches could do in the political process that doesn’t get them afoul of their nonprofit status,” agreed Julie Anderson, auditor for Pierce County, Washington.Earlier this year Anderson assisted in a training and voter registration event at the Holy Family of Jesus Episcopal Church in Tacoma, Washington.Some 70 Cambodian senior citizens registered to vote at that event. Anderson told ENS she has been working with the Korean Women’s Association and its Indochinese Cultural Service Center, housed on the church’s campus, to help educate voters.“Through them (the Korean Women’s Association), I visited just about every one of their senior meal sites and did voter registration.”Churches are especially poised to assist in such efforts because they “are community centers,” Anderson said. “They are places that people gather and many churches are already actively engaged in using their resources and facilities to reach marginalized populations,” said Anderson.Such civic engagement could even include hosting candidate forums “as long as they’re well-balanced, that all the candidates have an opportunity to participate but (that they are) not skewed in any way.”Other faith-based groups are also forging voter initiative partnerships. The PICO National Network on Aug. 4 launched “Together We Vote,” a multifaith, multiracial voter education and get-out-the-vote program after the close of the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.“We believe every person of faith should exercise their right to vote as an act of faith in co-creating the beloved community we all desire here on earth,” PICO’s political director, Bishop Dwayne Royster, said in a network press release.“We’re going to train 15,000 volunteers and leaders within our federations and allied organizations to go and do the work of knocking on doors and having phone conversations” to make sure people vote this season.The multifaith national- and state-based effort includes representatives from churches and other organizations, including the United Church of Christ, the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism (RAC); the African Methodist Episcopal Church; Bread for the World; Sojourners; and other groups.RAC Associate Director Barbara Weinstein, in the release, also cited concern about the attempted marginalization of voters through the “systematic silencing of individuals and communal voices at the ballot box in the form of closed polling stations, limitation on early voting and onerous voter ID laws.”At least 10 states representing collectively more than 80 million people have attempted to put into place restrictive voting laws ranging from “new hurdles to registration to cutbacks on early voting to stricter voter identification requirements,” according to the American Civil Liberties Union’s website.On Aug. 15, the governor of North Carolina said he would ask the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate a voter ID law and other restrictive measures passed by the state assembly in 2013 and overturned by a federal circuit court in July. North Carolina Episcopal churches have been working, as they have historically, to make sure voters have accurate information.Missouri Bishop Wayne Smith, in an Aug. 15 online blog post, offered hope for the defeat of a proposed state constitutional amendment that could require voters to present “valid government-issued photo identification” in order to vote.“The proposal seems fair enough to many, since everyone has a photo ID, or so they say,” according to Smith. “In fact, there are more without IDs than you might think. Sixty-four percent of U.S. residents do not have a passport, the second-most common form of acceptable ID. Eighteen percent do not have a driver’s license, the most common form of all. This latter number account for the sector most vulnerable to voter suppression. As a group, they are older, poorer, and more likely to be other than European in descent.”Smith added that since 2005, there have been 17 convictions under voting laws in Missouri. “The greater the poverty of the electorate, the easier it is to suppress the vote.”The Rev. Joseph Pae, rector of All Saints Episcopal Church in Great Neck, New York, said he is hoping to reprise a voter registration drive held before the April 19 primary election.The Korean American Civic Empowerment association sponsored the drive and registered about 10 first-time voters, he said.“In the past, the Korean community has not been active or registered to vote. We have been trying to raise more voter awareness,” Pae told ENS. The gathering involved neutral conversations and voter education, and assistance in completing the voter registration forms.“Some people were hesitating before, but they appreciated being able to attend a forum at the church,” he said.In California, where almost 650,000 new voters registered in the six weeks prior to the state’s May 23 primary election deadline, All Saints Church makes voter registration available every Sunday during the election season.“We invite the League of Women Voters to host a table after our church services and take registrations as needed,” said peace and justice director Juliana Serrano.The 3,000-member Pasadena church came under IRS scrutiny in 2004 after its former rector, the Rev. George Regas, preached a sermon two days before the 2004 election in which he imagined Jesus participating in a political debate with then-presidential candidates George W. Bush and John F. Kerry.Regas told the congregation that “good people of profound faith” could endorse either candidate but criticized the Iraq War and said Jesus would have told Bush that his preemptive war strategy in Iraq “has led to disaster.”Eventually, the IRS dropped its investigation of the church.– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Election 2016, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Dr. Erna Lund says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Election 2016: Episcopal churches, community partners help educate and register voters Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA By Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 22, 2016 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Faith & Politics Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Donald Trump, Comments (1) Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Comments are closed.last_img read more

Spanish language Bible stories brought back to life in Texas

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL September 23, 2016 at 11:40 am Sarah and Marthe, the Church Periodical Club awards grants for enterprises such as this. Go to http://www.ChurchPeriodical.com for grant instructions for National Books Fund and Miles of Pennies. The application forms and more information about this ministry are there also. Of course, we also accept fund-raising efforts for the Church Periodical Club. Betty A. Morris says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Comments are closed. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (2) Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA September 30, 2016 at 2:48 pm Thank you, Betty! We will pursue this. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Mike PattersonPosted Sep 21, 2016 Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Sarita de la Fuente says: Rector Knoxville, TN Thomas E. Fountain teaches reading to Central Americans with his biblical character stories in the 1940s.[Episcopal Diocese of West Texas] When she was an infant, Sarah Willingham’s father and mother loaded her in their 1939 Plymouth, hooked up a trailer filled with their household furnishings and an old pump organ, and headed off to Mexico. It marked the beginning of a journey that would take them on a lifelong mission of bringing the Gospel to Spanish-speaking peoples around the world.Thomas E. Fountain, or Tomás de la Fuente as he was known in the Spanish language books he wrote, was driven by a desire to spread the Bible to the indigenous people in Mexico, Honduras and other South and Central American countries. A prolific author in English, he expanded his writing skills to translate Bible stories into Spanish and retell them in a culturally sensitive way so that those with limited literacy could read, understand and apply their lessons to their own lives.Among his books for this audience was a series on biographical characters in the Bible, starting with Abraham, followed by José (Joseph) and then Sara. They have been out of print for years but now, nearly 75 years after she travelled to Mexico with her parents, Willingham is bringing them back to life.A member of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in San Marcos, she has started Libros de la Fuente, a not-for-profit publishing house in Wimberley, located southwest of Austin. Her goal is to bring her father’s books back into print and placed into the hands of Spanish speakers today by parishioners on mission trips from the Episcopal Diocese of West Texas and other Episcopal churches and denominations. Willingham said the books also have a place in Spanish-speaking congregations in the U.S. as well.Her work started about nine years as Willingham came across her father’s booklets after his death. “Pretty soon the Holy Spirit was poking at me” to reprint them, she said. Working under her Spanish name, Sarita de la Fuente, she did some editing on her father’s original work, and then tested their readability based on a program developed by her sister. “We have it at a grade level that not only is useful for the person who has basic reading skills but all reading levels as well,” she said.In addition, she developed study questions for the books so that they can be read all the way through or in segments.Currently, she has published the books on Abraham, Sarah and Joseph, but has plans to add more, including reprinting some of his other titles on the Parables and Jesus. “He wrote 18 of these,” she said. “Right now we have only the first three.”She’s also planning to write one herself on Isaac, based on instructions left by her father on how to write for this particular audience. “We’re naming it Isaac and his twin sons,” she said. “We’re trying to give it a little bit of a family feel to the title.”The books cost $7 each. The Diocese of West Texas is making the booklets available to team leaders going on mission trips to Spanish-speaking countries, said Marthe D. Curry, the diocese’s director for the Center for World Missions.“Everyone has loved them,” Curry said. “We will be pushing them more this fall with the new Sarah editions.”The diocese was also planning to offer them as part of a panel workshop on Sunday schools in the Mexican churches held in conjunction with Frontera Unida, a partnership of the clergy of Rio Grande Valley and New Mexico diocese.The Episcopal Church’s Office of Latino/Hispanic Ministries is also aware of the books. They have been used by other denominations as well.“People from Mexico in particular said that doesn’t read like translation speak,” she said. “It’s like it was written for me rather than written for someone else and translated for me.”She said readers feel the books make the biblical characters more approachable “and pertinent to their lives today. One person said that up until now these people were like cardboard characters or icons on the wall. Now they seem real to me.”Raised in New Jersey, Fountain’s work began with a draft deferment during World War II. Being a husband, father and Baptist minister, he was given a draft deferment for the military. However, he still wanted to help others through his ministry.Although he spoke nary a word of Spanish, he joined up with the Mexican Indian Mission group, was sent to Mexico City to learn the language, and then sent to rural Mexico in Husuchinango, Pueblo.“Dad felt these people really needed to read scripture,” Willingham said. The problem was that many had such a limited literacy level, people “were totally intimidated by trying to read the Bible at their skill of reading.”“He discovered that because of the limited readership that even those in seminary had a hard time with translated materials,” she said. “Some of the cultural bias was one thing. The other was that sometimes the vocabulary was just beyond them.”“That became the foundation for what he did,” she said. “He decided to go back and get an advanced degree in literacy and went to Honduras with the objective of teaching people how to read. They had only a 40 percent literacy rate. He felt that was fertile ground.”He used radio programs to reinforce readings and “then said to himself that he needed to find things for them to read. That’s when he began writing these booklets,” she said.“He took different biblical characters and retold their story in contemporary language and used a vocabulary list that inexpert readers or the newly literate could understand,” she said. “What he discovered was that not only did these people who were newly literate respond to these but a lot of the ministers and Bible study leaders found the material very useful.”Ministers even began referencing his work for sermons and Bible study leaders used his material for their work.“He really wanted folks to feel a personal connection with scripture and with the Gospel,” she said. “That it was not something that was out there but it was something they could really relate to.”Writing the books of Bible stories was not Fountain’s only publishing success. He also formed a publishing company in Mexico with offices in Costa Rica and published the writings of many Christian authors as well as some of his own work. One of his most notable books was Hermeneutics, which is still being used in some seminaries in South America.“He wrote all the time,” she said. “His passion was for people to really be able to access scripture. If they felt that the Bible that was put in their hands was beyond their capability to understand then there had to be another way to help them access that. That was really his passion, that they know the Gospel, that they know the Bible.”Willingham’s vision is to carry on her father’s mission by continuing to provide material that’s readable for any level, primarily in Spanish. For more information, contact Libros de la Fuente at [email protected]— Mike Patterson is a freelance writer and photographer. He attends St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church in Blanco, Texas. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Spanish language Bible stories brought back to life in Texas This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

Archbishop urges Southern Africans to support relief efforts in Mozambique…

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Africa, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Archbishop urges Southern Africans to support relief efforts in Mozambique after cyclone Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Cape Town Thabo Makgoba, primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, has issued a statement of condolence in the wake a cyclone in Mozambique that killed hundreds, possibly more than a thousand. Thabo also has urged Anglicans in Southern Africa to donate to the Province’s Disaster Relief Fund.Read the full article here. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Anglican Communion Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Posted Mar 20, 2019 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

Political tensions in Washington over immigration policy fuel Episcopal advocacy,…

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Refugees Migration & Resettlement Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL By David PaulsenPosted Jun 27, 2019 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Faith & Politics, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Political tensions in Washington over immigration policy fuel Episcopal advocacy, outreach Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Immigration, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Migrants walk toward a U.S. Border Patrol officer after crossing illegally into El Paso, Texas, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, on May 31. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church is stepping up its advocacy and outreach on immigration issues as political tensions grow in Washington over looming deportation raids, pending plans for humanitarian aid on the border and the treatment of migrant children held in U.S. detention centers.The federal raids reportedly were scheduled to take place in 10 cities on June 23 but were postponed at the last minute. One of the cities said to be targeted is Chicago, where Diocese of Chicago Bishop Jeffrey Lee issued a statement June 21 expressing solidarity with immigrants living in fear.“This news of new raids and mass deportations threatens to make these fears real, as families are torn apart and members of our communities and congregations are wrenched away from lives they have labored for years to build,” Lee said. “The threat of these raids makes it difficult not to conclude that our immigration system is failing to operate with common humanity or to embody the highest values of our country or its people.”Bishop David Reed in West Texas issued a statement on June 20, World Refugee Day, calling on his diocese to support immigration ministries. He asked that Episcopalians set aside political differences to care for all in need, as Jesus taught.“We can and should, and desperately need to, have informed, respectful debate on our country’s immigration laws and policies. But the time for that is not when a weary, confused, and hungry person stands before you,” Reed said, whether that person is an asylum-seeker or a Border Patrol agent.pic.twitter.com/AxNkctubL4— EMM (@EMMRefugees) June 20, 2019Reed’s diocese, which includes the borderlands from Del Rio, Texas, to the Gulf of Mexico, hosted a “Walk in Love” border tour in May that featured outreach to both migrants living in tents on the Mexico side of the border and law enforcement officials in the United States.Arizona Bishop Jennifer Reddall sent a letter June 25 to Arizona’s two U.S. senators and representatives from two of its congregational districts, expressing her opposition to “the holding of migrant children in filthy conditions” and requesting “immediate action.”Reddall was responding specifically to a New York Times report of squalid conditions at a border station in Clint, Texas, where migrant children as young as 7 years old are being held. Conditions reportedly are similar at other border facilities overwhelmed by the influx of migrant families.“The lack of sanitation, supervision, and humane treatment is appalling, and far from what any citizen should expect of its government,” Reddall said. “All children, regardless of their country of origin, warrant the most basic elements of care: a toothbrush, a bed, a blanket, and an adult to see to their medical, psychological, and social needs.”And on June 29, the seven bishops in the six Episcopal dioceses in California issued a joint statement calling for justice for migrant children being held by the U.S. government, including those at the Texas facility.“We who follow Jesus Christ know that he showed a special love for children,” the bishops said. “Jesus reminds us that children are to be welcomed, nourished, and cherished. As Christians, we honor the image of God in all human beings. The inhumane treatment of these children violates our most basic Christian values.”Those comments followed a joint statement issued June 6 by ecumenical leaders, including Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, addressing the issue of children in detention more broadly.“As U.S. religious leaders representing diverse faith perspectives, we are united in our concern for the well-being of vulnerable migrants who cross our borders fleeing from danger and threats to their lives,” the religious leaders said, singling out the cases of six young migrants who have died in U.S. custody since September.“Our houses of worship and agencies have welcomed, engaged and served many migrant families that have recently arrived in the U.S.,” the statement reads. “These migrants have left their communities to provide safety for their children and protect them from harm. … We urge the Administration to maintain its commitment to international law and defend human rights by implementing safeguards to ensure the safety and health of all of those seeking protection in our land, especially those children who fall under our care.”The potentially dangerous path followed by many migrant families seeking safety, opportunity and stability in the United States was brought into graphic detail this week by a photo of a Salvadoran father and his toddler lying dead in the Rio Grande. The image, captured by a Mexican journalist, has prompted international outcry and evoked comparisons to the 2015 image of a dead Syrian refugee boy washed up on a beach in Turkey.Ten Actions You Can Take to Accompany Undocumented Immigrantshttps://t.co/eIJ9UNnApe #EpiscopalAdvocacy pic.twitter.com/TRY4hCfAsI— The EPPN (@TheEPPN) June 26, 2019Even before the recent escalation of the political and humanitarian crisis on the border, The Episcopal Church has been outspoken on immigration issues. In July 2018, during General Convention in Austin, Texas, more than a thousand Episcopalians gathered at a prayer service outside an immigrant detention center in a nearby city. The spirit of that event, in support of immigrant parents and children who had been separated, carried through to the church’s legislative activity, with General Convention passing three resolutions related to immigration. One of the resolutions took a forceful stand against family separation and unjust treatment of immigrant parents and children.Another resolution emphasized respecting the dignity of immigrants, while the third encouraged Episcopalians to seek ways to offer sanctuary or support to immigrants. Some Episcopal churches have committed to providing physical sanctuary, if needed, for immigrants inside church walls, such as St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Seattle, which in March began housing a Mexico-born man who faces deportation.More recently, the Rev. Michael Kinman, rector of All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, California, wrote a letter June 22 for Pasadena News Now in which he offered his church as sanctuary to any immigrants who might be targeted by looming federal deportation actions.President Donald Trump had recently announced on Twitter that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, planned to “begin the process of removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States.”ICE reportedly would be going after about 2,000 immigrants who had received deportation orders in select cities, including Los Angeles. Kinman condemned those plans and said he had the support of his parish’s wardens and parishioners in offering the church as a place of sanctuary.“We have always stood for love over fear, reconciliation over division and restoration over retribution,” Kinman wrote. “As such, we call on President Trump, as president of a nation largely populated by immigrants and descendants of immigrants like himself, to stand down these raids.”Trump said June 22 on Twitter he had put the raids on hold for two weeks, to allow Congress time to reach a “solution to the Asylum and Loophole problems at the Southern Border. If not, Deportations start!”With roots in the 1980s sanctuary movement that offered refuge to Central Americans fleeing war, the new sanctuary movement has been growing in recent years in response to rising animosity toward immigrants and the anti-immigration policies of the Trump administration.Most asylum-seekers come from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, typically fleeing violence or persecution. Episcopal churches in the border region are responding to the crisis in a variety of ways.Churches are considered “sensitive locations” that traditionally are not targeted for immigration enforcement. In one case, at St. Barnabas’ Episcopal Church in Greensboro, North Carolina, the congregation has for more than two years provided refuge for a Guatemalan woman ordered to return home.The Diocese of the Rio Grande, which includes parts of New Mexico and Texas, has identified asylum-seekers as a key focus for its outreach efforts on the border, particularly in the El Paso, Texas, area. In December, the diocese hosted a pilgrimage to the city, welcoming about 30 people representing large urban and suburban congregations, so they could learn firsthand about the circumstances facing asylum-seekers.“We would like … to join together in fellowship by soliciting, gathering, and delivering critically needed items to the El Paso area where shelters are currently overwhelmed, with refugees being released at times by the hundreds on a daily basis,” the diocese says on a webpage listing resources for assisting asylum-seekers.The diocese also recently began providing bus transportation for some of the asylum-seekers.“All through this involvement in immigration ministry, we’ve always had the sense that, when the knock came on the door, it was Jesus who was knocking, and it certainly has been our experience that opening the door to the migrants has been letting him into our lives, and it’s been very powerful,” the Rev. Joe Britton, rector of St. Michael and All Angels Church in Albuquerque, New Mexico, said in an online video about his congregation’s and the diocese’s work.Rio Grande Bishop Michael Hunn is scheduled to speak about immigration issues during a July 2 webinar organized by Episcopal Migration Ministries. Registration for the webinar is still open.The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, based in Washington, D.C., also offers a range of resources for Episcopalians interested in advocating for the church’s positions on these issues.“The Episcopal Church, through General Convention policy, calls for an immediate end to the inhumane practice of family detention, calls for the immediate release of detained asylum seekers … and upholds the sanctity of the asylum process and urges strong support for the protection of vulnerable individuals,” the agency says in an online summary.In April, The Episcopal Church signed a letter to Congress drafted by the Interfaith Immigration Coalition asking lawmakers to prioritize human needs rather than immigration enforcement.“We believe that our nation’s budget and the decisions made by Congress in the coming weeks should be treated as a moral roadmap toward a world where every child of God is clothed, fed, safe, loved, and free,” the letter said. It was signed by more than 30 interreligious groups and denominations. “As people of faith, our various traditions command us to love our neighbors and welcome guests as we would welcome God.”On June 25, the House voted to approve $4.5 billion in humanitarian aid to ease the crisis on the border, though the bill’s restrictions on how that money can be spent – not to bolster ICE raids on immigrants – are at odds with a parallel bill that the Senate approved on June 26, The New York Times reported. The White House has threatened to veto the House’s bill.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

Public Service Director Davoll Apopka’s MVP?

first_img 1 COMMENT Apopka City Hall Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here TAGSBen ZobristJay DavollPublic Services Department Previous articleSeva Beauty opens in ApopkaNext articleApopka boys win state bowling title. Again. Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 That’s funny…..I thought my husband was the MVP when he was employed at the COA. Mama Mia You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Reply 20-year career a study in versatilityBen Zobrist is this season’s World Series Most Valuable Player for the Chicago Cubs and last season for the Kansas City Royals. He hits for power and average. He steals bases. He plays five different positions. He is versatile, reliable and clutch.Zobrist plays five positions, Davoll plays many positions for Apopka as well.If The City of Apopka were a baseball team, Ronald “Jay” Davoll would be its Ben Zobrist.Robert Sargent, the Public Information Officer for the City of Apopka, recognizes Davoll’s versatility and his value to the City.“Jay contributes so much to the success of the City of Apopka as both public services director and city engineer. With his additional experience in community development, he provides valuable insight into a wide variety of city services.”On October 28th, Davoll celebrated his 20-year anniversary as an employee at The City of Apopka. And like Zobrist, he has played many positions. Duvall began as a City Engineer.  In 2009, he was appointed Community Development Director.  In 2015, he was appointed Public Services Director, which is his current position.Davoll seems to be the resident expert on many matters in Apopka. When the Florida Department of Environmental Protection fined the City for improperly discharging treated effluent from the City’s wastewater treatment plant, he worked with the FDEP and expertly explained the City’s case and got the fine dropped. When there were parking issues and questions asked at the Parking Ordinance Committee’s meetings, Duvall was there to clarify. When there was a traffic issue with the proposed location of Tractor Supply, Davoll was there with a solution. Need a voice of reason at the Budget Workshop meetings? Davoll is your man.Mayor Joe Kilsheimer also sees his value to the City of Apopka.“Jay Davoll is one of those die-hard Apopka residents who does it all for his city,” said Kilsheimer at the City Council meeting Wednesday as he recognized Davoll’s 20-year career at the City. “I don’t know how we would do it without him.” Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. November 4, 2016 at 2:48 pmlast_img read more

4 Rivers owner will speak at Apopka Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 TAGSApopka Mayors Prayer BreakfastJohn Rivers Previous articleSurvey: 1 in 3 US drivers cannot pay for a car repair billNext articleSurviving Ebola: Documentary shows the battle was won Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply 11th Annual event coincides with National Day of PrayerWhen it comes to business, John Rivers is a renaissance man.Retiring as president of a $1.5 billion dollar company, Rivers left a career of twenty years in healthcare to follow a lifelong dream of owning a restaurant. In 2009 Rivers opened his first concept, 4 Rivers Smokehouse, that quickly became one of the fastest growing restaurants in the southeast. With thirteen locations in Florida and one soon to open in Atlanta, the success and popularity of his 4 Rivers Smokehouse and his second concept, the Southern-inspired COOP, have garnered national recognition. Nation’s Restaurant News, the industry’s lead trade publication, recognized 4 Rivers as one of their top five breakout brands. Restaurant Business named John as one of the Power 20 Leaders in the restaurant industry, Orlando Magazine included him among Orlando’s “50 Most Powerful, 15 to Watch” and in 2013, he was named a finalist for the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award.Rivers will be the speaker at the 11th annual Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast on May 4th at the Apopka Community Center/VFW, at 519 S. Central Avenue.The Prayer Breakfast is hosted by the Apopka Christian Ministerial Alliance and is held each year on the first Thursday of May in conjunction with the National Day of Prayer.John RiversRivers has twice been honored to cook at the prestigious James Beard House in New York City and has enjoyed participating at the Food Network South Beach Wine & Food Festival and the Atlanta Food & Wine Festival for the last six consecutive years. He has appeared on numerous television shows and has been featured in national publications including Food & Wine, Bon Appetit, Zagat, USA Today, Cigar Aficionado, Business Insider, Cooking Light Magazine, and Paula Deen Magazine. John also authored his first book, “The Southern Cowboy Cookbook,” that has enjoyed success at Barnes & Noble, Costco, and Amazon.A graduate of Florida State University College of Business, where he serves on the Board of Governors, Rivers chairs the 4R Foundation and serves on the boards of numerous school and community charity organizations. He is the co-founder of two annual charity festivals: “Cows ‘n Cabs” in Winter Park and “Pink & Swine” in Tallahassee, and lives in Winter Park with his wife Monica and two children, Jared and Cameron.Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased before the event. Tickets are available at The Apopka Chief /The Planter, 400 N. Park Avenue, and the Apopka Area Chamber of Commerce, 180 E. Main Street.Table sponsorships packages are available. For more information on sponsorship packages, contact Jackie Trefcer at The Apopka Chief and The Planter at 407-886-2777 or Pastor Darrell Morgan, ministerial alliance president, at 407-886-7427. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more