Reporters Without Borders, laureate of the International Association of Press Clubs Award

first_img June 4, 2013 – Updated on January 25, 2016 Reporters Without Borders, laureate of the International Association of Press Clubs Award Reporters Without Borders received on June 4, in Warsaw, the Freedom of Speech Award by the International Association of Press Clubs (IAPC). This organization, representing thirty Press Clubs in twenty countries, awards this prize for the first time to “people or organizations” recognized for their “outstanding contributions to the defense or the struggle for freedom of expression, the creation of conditions to support freedom of speech.” Reporters Without Borders has been elected by the delegates of the Press Clubs among very prestigious nominees.The presentation ceremony took place in the Great Assembly Hall of the Royal Castle of Warsaw. Lech Wałęsa, the legendary leader of “Solidarity” movement and the former president of Poland were in attendance along with the chairman of IAPC. The award was collected by the president of Reporters Without Borders International Gerald Sapey and the organisation’s general secretary Christophe Deloire. A part of the award ceremony was the first public screening of scenes from the movie Wałęsa and a meeting with its director, Andrzej Wajda, who spoke about the limits on free speech in Polish cinema under communism .”We are very proud to receive this award from the International Association of Press Clubs, especially in a country, Poland, where we do not ignore the value of journalists’ courage against despotism. As the famous Polish journalist Ryszard Kapuscinski once wrote, ‘silence is a sign of misfortune, and often crime’. Around the world, the forces of silence and propaganda are very powerful. This award encourages the entire team of Reporters Without Borders and our correspondents in 130 countries to continue our fight to defend dissent voices” said Christophe Deloire, general secretary of Reporters Without Borders.More information on : http://freedomofspeechaward.org/ Organisation Help by sharing this informationcenter_img RSF_en Newslast_img read more

JPL Plays Key Role Solving Rusty Moon Mystery

first_img The blue areas in this composite image from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) aboard the Indian Space Research Organization’s Chandrayaan-1 orbiter show water concentrated at the Moon’s poles. Homing in on the spectra of rocks there, researcher found signs of hematite, a form of rust. Credit: ISRO/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Brown University/USGSScientists were recently surprised to find evidence that our airless moon has rust on it.A recent paper published in Science Advances reviews data uncovered by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument, or M3, built by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena.M3 was onboard the Indian Space Research Organization’s Chandrayaan-1 orbiter when it discovered water ice and mapped out a variety of minerals while surveying the Moon’s surface in 2009.Water interacts with rock to produce a diversity of minerals, and on that mission M3 detected spectra – or light reflected off surfaces – that revealed the Moon’s poles had a very different composition than the rest of it.Lead paper author Shuai Li of the University of Hawaii has studied that water extensively in data from M3.Li homed in on the polar spectra. While the Moon’s surface is littered with iron-rich rocks, he was surprised to find a close match with the spectral signature of hematite, a form of iron oxide, or rust, produced when iron is exposed to oxygen and water.But the Moon isn’t supposed to have oxygen or liquid water, so how can it be rusting?The mystery starts with the solar wind, a stream of charged particles that flows out from the Sun, bombarding Earth and the Moon with hydrogen. Hydrogen makes it harder for hematite to form. It’s what is known as a reducer, meaning it adds electrons to the materials it interacts with. That’s the opposite of what is needed to make hematite: For iron to rust, it requires an oxidizer, which removes electrons. And while the Earth has a magnetic field shielding it from this hydrogen, the Moon does not.“It’s very puzzling,” Li said. “The Moon is a terrible environment for hematite to form in.” So he turned to JPL scientists Abigail Fraeman and Vivian Sun to help poke at M3’s data and confirm his discovery of hematite.“At first, I totally didn’t believe it. It shouldn’t exist based on the conditions present on the Moon,” Fraeman said. “But since we discovered water on the Moon, people have been speculating that there could be a greater variety of minerals than we realize if that water had reacted with rocks.”After taking a close look, Fraeman and Sun became convinced M3’s data does indeed indicate the presence of hematite at the lunar poles. “In the end, the spectra were convincingly hematite-bearing, and there needed to be an explanation for why it’s on the Moon,” Sun said.JPL is presently building a new version of M3 for an orbiter called Lunar Trailblazer. One of its instruments, the High-resolution Volatiles and Minerals Moon Mapper (HVM3), will be mapping water ice in permanently shadowed craters on the Moon, and may be able to reveal new details about hematite as well.Li’s paper offers a three-pronged model to explain how rust might form in such an environment. For starters, while the Moon lacks an atmosphere, it is in fact home to trace amounts of oxygen. The source of that oxygen is our planet. Earth’s magnetic field trails behind the planet like a windsock. In 2007, Japan’s Kaguya orbiter discovered that oxygen from Earth’s upper atmosphere can hitch a ride on this trailing magnetotail, as it’s officially known, traveling the 239,000 miles (385,00 kilometers) to the Moon.That discovery fits with data from M3, which found more hematite on the Moon’s Earth-facing near side than on its far side. “This suggested that Earth’s oxygen could be driving the formation of hematite,” Li said. The Moon has been inching away from Earth for billions of years, so it’s also possible that more oxygen hopped across this rift when the two were closer in the ancient past.Then there’s the matter of all that hydrogen being delivered by the solar wind. As a reducer, hydrogen should prevent oxidation from occurring. But Earth’s magnetotail has a mediating effect. Besides ferrying oxygen to the Moon from our home planet, it also blocks over 99 percent of the solar wind during certain periods of the Moon’s orbit (specifically, whenever it’s in the full Moon phase). That opens occasional windows during the lunar cycle when rust can form.The third piece of the puzzle is water. While most of the Moon is bone dry, water ice can be found in shadowed lunar craters on the Moon’s far side. But the hematite was detected far from that ice.The paper instead focuses on water molecules found in the lunar surface. Li proposes that fast-moving dust particles that regularly pelt the Moon could release these surface-borne water molecules, mixing them with iron in the lunar soil. Heat from these impacts could increase the oxidation rate; the dust particles themselves may also be carrying water molecules, implanting them into the surface so that they mix with iron. During just the right moments – namely, when the Moon is shielded from the solar wind and oxygen is present – a rust-inducing chemical reaction could occur.More data is needed to determine exactly how the water is interacting with rock. That data could also help explain another mystery: why smaller quantities of hematite are also forming on the far side of the Moon, where the Earth’s oxygen shouldn’t be able to reach it.Fraeman said this model may also explain hematite found on other airless bodies like asteroids. “It could be that little bits of water and the impact of dust particles are allowing iron in these bodies to rust,” she said.Li noted that it’s an exciting time for lunar science. Almost 50 years since the last Apollo landing, the Moon is a major destination again. NASA plans to send dozens of new instruments and technology experiments to study the Moon beginning next year, followed by human missions beginning in 2024 all as part of the Artemis program.“I think these results indicate that there are more complex chemical processes happening in our solar system than have been previously recognized,” Sun said.“We can understand them better by sending future missions to the Moon to test these hypotheses.” More Cool Stuff STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy 77 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. 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Required fields are marked * Business Newscenter_img STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Make a comment Community News Subscribe CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Science and Technology JPL Plays Key Role Solving Rusty Moon Mystery STAFF REPORT Published on Monday, September 7, 2020 | 5:43 pmlast_img read more

Ireland’s PM returns to medical practice to help in coronavirus crisis

first_img“Many of his family and friends are working in the health service. He wanted to help out even in a small way,” the spokesman added.Last month, health minister Simon Harris launched a recruitment drive for the country’s struggling health service to tackle the coronavirus outbreak with a stark message: “Your country needs you”.The HSE said it had spoken to thousands of healthcare professionals who may be eligible to return after it received more than 70,000 responses for its “Be on call for Ireland” initiative.According to a report in the Irish Times, Varadkar is helping out with phone assessments. Anybody who may have been exposed to the virus is initially assessed over the phone.Varadkar comes from a medical family. He is the son of a doctor and a nurse and, according to the Irish Times, his partner, two sisters and their husbands all work in healthcare. Ireland’s prime minister Leo Varadkar has re-registered as a medical practitioner and will work one shift a week to help out during the coronavirus crisis, his office said on Sunday.Varadkar worked as a doctor for seven years before leaving the profession to become a politician and was removed from the medical register in 2013.He rejoined the medical register in March, and offered his services to the country’s Health Service Executive (HSE) for one session a week in areas that are within his scope of practice, a spokesman for his office said. Topics :last_img read more

Ronaldo ready to play for Portugal despite Juve concerns – Santos

first_imgRelatedPosts Ronaldo strikes 90th Europe goal, sets record of scoring against 40 Nations Pope warns nations against defining power as military strength 2018 World Cup qualifier: Defoe scores on England return Portugal’s Juventus forward, Cristiano Ronaldo, is ready to play in their Euro 2020 qualifiers against Lithuania and Luxembourg despite concerns over his fitness which came to the fore last weekend, coach Fernando Santos said on Wednesday.Ronaldo was substituted in the 55th minute of Juventus’ win over AC Milan in Serie A on Sunday, the earliest he has been taken off by the Italian champions, and he was visibly furious with coach Maurizio Sarri as he stormed down the tunnel.Sarri said after the game that Ronaldo has been managing a knee problem for the last month without missing matches and has also been dealing with thigh and calf muscle problems.However, Santos said there was no issue with the country’s most capped player and record scorer, who has scored 95 international goals and could reach a century in Portugal’s Group B games against Lithuania and Luxemburg.Portugal will seal a place at Euro 2020 if they beat Lithuania and Serbia fail to beat Luxembourg.“If he wasn’t fit we wouldn’t have called him up. Everyone likes to talk and speculate about Cristiano Ronaldo because he is the best player in the world,” he told a news conference ahead of Thursday’s game at home to Lithuania.He added: “If it was any other player there would be no such fuss. He is fit and he’s going to play.”Santos, who led Portugal to glory at Euro 2016, became more irritated as he was further pressed about the Juve forward, declaring: “This conference is not about Cristiano Ronaldo, it’s about Portugal and the game with Lithuania”. Tags: LIthuanialast_img read more