Chase makes bold statement with stunning new flagship branch

first_imgIn one morning, Chase Bank made its ambitious plans for building more branches around the country more concrete than ever by unveiling its “flagship branch,” reemphasized the importance of face-to-face banker-to-customer contact, and sent Bank of America fair warning it was going to put boots on the ground on its home turf.As the bank unveiled its 12,500 square-foot high tech/high touch branch, Gordon Smith, Co-President and Co-Chief Operating Officer, and Consumer & Community Banking CEO, gave a powerful endorsement to physical banking. His words came not long after the termination of the megabank’s Finn mobile bank brand.“Branches are the heart of the company,” said Smith, speaking to a crowd of Chase employees and media. “Whenever we move into a new location, it’s the branch that drives all of the business we do.”“We hear an awful lot about, ‘Will branches exist in the future?’,” continued Smith. “The answer is a very resounding ‘Yes’. We have more than 5,000 branches and more than a million people go through those branches in a day.” continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Area Girls Basketball Scores (11-18)

first_imgArea Girls Basketball Scores.Saturday  (11-18)Batesville  50     South Dearborn  27Batesville JV won 40-34Batesville C team lost to SW Shelby 26-14East Central  44     Mt. Vernon  26Franklin County  61     Switz. County  37Greensburg  69     Jennings County  38North Decatur  62     South Decatur  39Rising Sun  40     Waldron  38Plainfield  53     Rushville  30Anderson  75     Connersville  36New Washington  75     Shawe Memorial  42Salem  51     Madison  44last_img read more

Ex-players sue NFL over use of painkillers

first_imgIn this Oct. 7, 2011 file photo, President Barack Obama, left, looks towards quarterback Jim McMahon, wearing headband, as he honors the 1985 Super Bowl XX Champion Chicago Bears football team during a ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. A group of retired NFL players, including McMahon, says in a lawsuit filed Tuesday, May 20, 2014, that the league illegally supplied them with risky painkillers that numbed their injuries and led to medical complications. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — Opening another legal attack on the NFL over the long-term health of its athletes, a group of retired players accused the league in a lawsuit Tuesday of cynically supplying them with powerful painkillers and other drugs that kept them in the game but led to serious complications later in life.The lawsuit, which seeks unspecified damages on behalf of more than 500 ex-athletes, charges the NFL with putting profits ahead of players’ health.To speed injured athletes’ return to the field, team doctors and trainers dispensed drugs illegally, without obtaining prescriptions or warning of the possible side effects, the plaintiffs contend.Some football players said they were never told they had broken bones and were instead fed pills to mask the pain. One said that instead of surgery, he was given anti-inflammatory drugs and excused from practices so he could play in games. Others said that after years of free pills from the NFL, they retired addicted to painkillers.NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, in Atlanta for the league’s spring meetings, said, “Our attorneys have not seen the lawsuit and obviously I have been in meetings all day.”The case comes less than a year after the NFL agreed to pay $765 million to settle lawsuits from thousands of retired players who accused it of concealing the risks of concussions. A federal judge has yet to approve the settlement, expressing concern the amount is too small.The athletes in the concussion case blamed dementia and other health problems on the bone-crushing hits that helped lift pro football to new heights of popularity.The new lawsuit was filed in federal court in San Francisco and names eight players as plaintiffs, including three members of the NFL champion 1985 Chicago Bears: quarterback Jim McMahon, Hall of Fame defensive end Richard Dent and offensive lineman Keith Van Horne.More than 500 other former players have signed on, according to lawyers, who are seeking class-action status for the case. Six of the plaintiffs also took part in the concussion-related litigation, including McMahon and Van Horne.“The NFL knew of the debilitating effects of these drugs on all of its players and callously ignored the players’ long-term health in its obsession to return them to play,” said Steven Silverman, an attorney for the players.As a result of masking their pain with drugs, players developed heart, lung and nerve ailments; kidney failure; and chronic injuries to muscles, bones and ligaments, the lawsuit alleges.According to the lawsuit, players were routinely given drugs that included narcotic painkillers Percodan, Percocet and Vicodin, anti-inflammatories such as Toradol, and sleep aids such as Ambien.Toradol, which can be injected, was described as “the current game-day drug of choice of the NFL.” The medication may raise the risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney failure or intestinal bleeding.After receiving numbing injections and pills before kickoff, players got more drugs and sleep aids after games, “to be washed down by beer,” the lawsuit says.Kyle Turley, who played for three teams in his eight-year career, said drugs were “handed out to us like candy.”“There was a room set up near the locker room and you got in line,” Turley said. “Obviously, we were grown adults and we had a choice. But when a team doctor is saying this will take the pain away, you trust them.”McMahon said he suffered a broken neck and ankle during his career, but instead of sitting out, he received medication and was pushed back onto the field. Team doctors and trainers never told him about the injuries, according to the lawsuit.McMahon also became addicted to painkillers, at one point taking more than 100 Percocet pills per month, even in the offseason, the lawsuit says.Van Horne played an entire season on a broken leg and wasn’t told about the injury for five years, “during which time he was fed a constant diet of pills to deal with the pain,” according to the lawsuit.Former offensive lineman Jeremy Newberry retired in 2009 and said that because of the drugs he took while playing, he suffers from kidney failure, high blood pressure and violent headaches.On game days, Newberry said, he and up to 25 of his San Francisco 49ers teammates would retreat to the locker room to receive Toradol injections in the buttocks 10 minutes before kickoff. The drug numbed the pain almost instantaneously.“The stuff works. It works like crazy. It really does. There were whole seasons when I was in a walking boot and crutches,” Newberry said in an interview. “I would literally crutch into the facility and sprint out of the tunnel to go play.”Newberry said he never considered not taking the drugs because he knew he’d be out of a job if he didn’t play hurt, and the only side effect he was warned about was bruising. He said he could tell which players on the opposing team had used Toradol because of the bloodstains on their pants.After he retired, Newberry said, he saw a specialist who reviewed his medical records and found that for years, the protein levels in his urine had been elevated, a precursor to kidney problems. Newberry said he got blood work during a team-sponsored physical every year but was never told about any problems.“They said, ‘You’re good to go, you passed another one. You’re cleared to play,’” Newberry said.___Associated Press sports writers Barry Wilner in Atlanta and Larry Lage in Detroit contributed to this report.___Follow Ben Nuckols on Twitter at https://twitter.com/APBenNuckolslast_img read more

Mallard’s Team of the Week — Team Nelson Street Hockey

first_imgStaff and management at Mallard’s Source for Sports took to the streets of Kelowna to find the latest recipients of Team of the Week. A group of local hockey players made their way to the Central Okanagan earlier this month to compete in Hockey Night in Canada’s Play On! 4 on 4 Street Hockey Tournament outside Prospera Place — home of the WHL’s Rockets — in Kelowna. Team Nelson looked very strong in the preliminary round, finishing with a 2-1 record. However, Team Nelson was upset during the semi finals by a squad the Heritage City players had defeated in the round robin. Still a great showing by Team Nelson, pictured L-R, Coleton Dachwitz, captain Sam Weber, Justin Podgorenko, Tyler Podgorenko, Adam Maida and Brody Bueller.last_img read more

SANTA ANITA WINTER MEET WAGERING MENU INCLUDES ENHANCED PICK SIX, LOW TAKEOUT WIN, PLACE & SHOW WAGERING AS WELL AS POPULAR 50 CENT PLAYERS PICK FIVE BEGINNING OPENING DAY, DEC. 26

first_imgSanta Anita will offer a $1 million guaranteed all-stakes Late Pick 4 on Opening Day, Dec. 26. ARCADIA, Calif. (Dec. 23, 2016)–Santa Anita’s Winter Meet, which opens Monday, Dec. 26, will offer fans a comprehensive pari-mutuel betting menu that will include an enhanced Pick Six with a Single Ticket Jackpot component. Seventy percent of the pool will continue to be paid out to those with six winners, and the same 70 percent will be carried over in the event there are no tickets with six winners. Consolation tickets will now be paid with 15 percent of the remaining pool, while the remaining 15 percent will be allocated for a separate “jackpot,” which will be paid in the event of a single winning ticket. On a mandatory payout day, consolation payoffs will be made just as they ordinarily would on any other racing day.   Santa Anita will also continue to offer the nation’s lowest major track takeout of 15.43 percent on win, place and show wagers, as well as the popular 50 cent Players Pick Five, one dollar exactas, one dollar trifectas, two dollar rolling Daily Doubles, one dollar rolling Pick Threes, an early and late 50 cent Pick Four, a one dollar Super High Five and 10 cent Superfectas.Santa Anita’s 2016-17 Winter Meet Wagering Menu will offer the following:-$500,000 guaranteed Late Pick 4 each weekend (excluding Sun. Feb. 5)                -$300,000 guaranteed Late Pick 4 each weekday                -$100,000 guaranteed Pick 6 each weekend                -The 50 cent Players Pick 5. Comprised of races one through five, the Pick Five features a low takeout of 14 percent. If no one correctly selects all five winners, 100 percent of the net pool is carried over to the next racing day.                -Two dollar Win, Place & Show wagering on each race, featuring the lowest takeout (15.43 percent) of any major racetrack in the nation.                -One dollar Trifectas on each race (minimum of four runners required).                -10 cent Superfectas will be offered on all races (minimum of six horses scheduled to start).                -One dollar Exactas are offered on each race.                -The newly enhanced two dollar Pick Six will be offered on the final six races each day.                 -The 50 cent early Pick 4 will cover races two, three, four and five, each day. The Late Pick 4 will cover the final four races on each card.                -Rolling two dollar Daily Doubles, which feature a 20 percent takeout.                -One dollar rolling Pick Threes will be offered beginning with the first race each day.                -One dollar Super High Five, which requires bettors to correctly select the first five finishers in each day’s final race (minimum of eight runners) will again be offered. If no one selects the top five horses in exact finish order, 100 percent of the net pool carries over to the next day.                For more information on Santa Anita’s upcoming Winter Meet, please visit santaanita.com or call (626) 574-RACE.last_img read more

Indian businessman says he bought Barbados Tridents for $100

first_imgNEW DELHI, India (CMC): Indian businessman Vijay Mallya says he has paid only $100 for the Barbados Tridents, a franchise in the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) T20 tournament. Mallya’s revelation comes roughly two months after he made the purchase, ending weeks of speculation about the sale. Tridents is one of six franchises participation in the CPL, which is set to bowl off from June 29 and run until August 7. “Everyone made a big drama about me acquiring the CPL team Barbados Tridents,” said Mallya. “It was an acquisition that was not made for any cash. The acquisition was made for just $100.” Mallya has been described as a troubled businessman who left India last month amid attempts by creditors to recover US$ 1.5 billion owed by the long-grounded Kingfisher Airlines. He bought the CPL team in February just before stepping down as chairman of United Spirits and subsequently also lost control over IPL franchise Royal Challengers Bangalore. “By buying the team, me and the other shareholders assumed the obligation to participate in the tournament,” said Mallya. “Now, participation in CPL cost money. So I went to the Barbados government saying ‘I need your support’. I met the prime minister and the government agreed to support, but I paid $100 only to buy the team.” Mallya says the cost of running the franchise is estimated to be around $2 million. “The Barbados government is granting subsidies to the franchise. People don’t get it, and jump to conclusions without knowing the facts,” said Mallya, who is reportedly living in the United Kingdom. “There is a cost of participation, such as players’ salaries and franchise fee. So I worked out all the numbers, studied the model and went to the government asking for help. They were keen to help me.”last_img read more

More South Africans getting educated

first_img30 October 2012 South Africans are becoming increasingly better educated, according to the country’s latest census, with the proportion of children at school showing a marked increase, as well as the percentage of people who have completed their secondary schooling. Statistics South Africa released the results of census 2011, the country’s third population count since democratic elections were first held in 1994, in Pretoria on Tuesday. The previous censuses took place in 2001 and 1996. There has been a general increase in the percentage of South Africans from the ages of five up to 15 attending school, the census 2011 results show. Enrolment for the five-year-old age group increased from 22.5% in 1996 to 45.6% in 2001 to 81.2% in 2011. For the six-year-old age group, these figures were at 49.1% in 1996, 70.3% in 2001 and 92.7% in 2011, while for the seven-year-old group they were at 73.1% in 1996, 88.4% in 2001 and 96.1% in 2011. “The vast majority of students in South Africa attend public educational institutions. Only 5% of those aged 5 to 24 years, who were attending educational institutions in 2001, attended private institutions as opposed to the 7.3% in 2011,” the census report states.Increase in private school attendance There was a general increase in private school attendance across all the provinces, with the highest in Gauteng at 16.7%, followed by the Western Cape at 7.5% and the Free State at 6.4%. All other provinces had private institution attendance rates of less than 5%. An increase in black Africans aged between 5 and 24 years attending educational institutions was also recorded. Figures for this population group increased steadily from 70.7% in 1996 to 72.1% in 2001, to 73.9% in 2011. Attendance rates among coloured, Indian/Asian and white population groups also increased. The results also showed that the proportion of individuals aged 20 who have no schooling, halved from 19.1% in 1996 to 8.6% in 2011. “There is a significant decrease in persons with no schooling over the 10 years,” the report states. In addition, the percentage of South Africans aged 20 years and older that have received no formal education has decreased steadily between 1996 and 2011. In 1996, 17% of males in this age group had no formal education. This decreased to 15.5% in 2001 and further to 7.2% in 2011. Among females, the percentage with no formal education declined from 20.9% in 1996, to 20% in 2001 and 9.9% in 2011. A notable improvement was also recorded in the number of people who had completed their education. “The proportion of persons who completed secondary education (matric) or higher increased from 23.4% in 1996 to 40.5% in 2011,” the report states. Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

Six tips for finding a geocache in an environmentally friendly way

first_img SharePrint RelatedGeocaching in Harmony with Nature (Part 2)November 23, 2013In “Community”Geocaching in Harmony with Nature (Part 1)October 26, 2013In “Cache In Trash Out”5 Tips to Achieve Geocaching StardomFebruary 4, 2013In “Community” Geocaching is a great reason to get outside, enjoy a breath of fresh air, and reconnect with nature. If you are like most geocachers, you want to be respectful to your surroundings—especially plants and wildlife! To give you some pointers, we compiled six tips to show your love for Mother Earth when geocaching.1. Come preparedWhen planning a geocaching trip, make sure to read the geocache description carefully. This way you’ll be informed about the seasonal changes in your area. Do not visit caves in which bears or bats hibernate during autumn and winter and educate yourself as not to disturb breeding habitats. Before searching for a night cache in the woods, check in with park rangers or land management to make sure that this is safe for you and for the natural area.2. Stay on trackStick to designated trails and don’t cut across switchbacks when navigating to the geocache. Doing so might disturb flora and fauna along the way.3. Bring garbage bagsGeocacher Cindi Lee G. says: “We cache in and trash out every time we go geocaching or hiking.” We think that’s grand! Next time you go geocaching, include a few garbage bags with your geocaching gear. This way you can pick up litter on the way to and from the geocache. Some geocaches even have an extra compartment for trash bags that geocachers can use to Cache In Trash Out® (CITO) on their way back.4. Leave the car at home If possible, bike or walk to the geocache location. This is not only great for your health and good for the environment, the slower pace might even make you notice things along the way you would have never seen speeding by in your car.5. Respect wildlife and plantsObserve wild animals from afar. Never feed or try to touch them. Be conscious where you are stepping so you don’t destroy fragile plants and mushrooms. Pro-Tip from Geocacher Sarah H.: “Please clean your footwear and gear when hiking in various places. Footwear caked in mud and plant material is a good way to spread invasive species.”6. It is OK to DNFYou have searched in all the obvious places. You took a good look at the geocache description and the hint, but you still couldn’t find it. Log your DNF (Did Not Find) online to let the geocache owner know that you did not find the geocache. Don’t keep on searching, turning over every stone, and potentially ravaging the area. Keep in mind: A DNF is not admission to failure, it is just honest communication.We hope these tips will help you sharpen your nature senses and become a skilled environmentally friendly geocacher. Do you have another tip for environmentally friendly geocaching? Let us know in the comments below!Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Why the Offshore Wind Industry Is About to Take Off

first_imgThere are only five wind turbines operating in U.S. waters today. But that will likely soon change, partly because of states with ambitious offshore wind targets.Off the Massachusetts coastline, for example, Vineyard Wind aims to build one of the nation’s first commercial-scale offshore wind farms. This planned 800-megawatt offshore wind farm will be capable of generating enough electricity to power at least 400,000 homes. And Rhode Island has given the company Deepwater Wind a green light to build a 400-megawatt offshore wind farm as well. These turbines, all of which are slated to be located near the island of Martha’s Vineyard, would be among several big offshore wind projects that could transform the grid.We lead an offshore wind energy graduate program at the University of Massachusetts that brings together engineering, wildlife ecology, public engagement and political science students. Through this work, we have come to believe offshore will become a major new source of domestic renewable energy for the nation.Momentum from the market and the statesThe Massachusetts and Rhode Island ventures are planned to be built only a few miles away from the site that had been slated for Cape Wind, which was supposed to be the first commercial-scale offshore wind project ever built in the U.S. What changed after those plans collapsed in 2015 following a 13-year effort?Perhaps the biggest momentum is coming from market forces, which have improved. Cape Wind’s troubles stemmed from a mix of high costs and public and political opposition that doomed the project. But the pace of nuclear and coal-fired plant closures has picked up since then.Meanwhile, the cost of generating electricity through wind off the coast of Europe, the one region where the industry has gained critical mass, has decreased sharply.Here in the U.S, the Trump administration is approving new leases for offshore wind development. And the industry is gaining state-level support, especially in an East Coast corridor that runs as far south as North Carolina.Despite Cape Wind’s demise, Massachusetts became the first state to set offshore wind goals in 2016. It aims to install at least 1,600 megawatts of electricity — enough to power over 600,000 homes — by 2027.Soon after, New York released an even more ambitious master plan, which aims to install 2,400 megawatts of electricity by 2030. Then, New Jersey went further, committing to a 3,500-megawatt goal by 2030.Besides these three states, another five — Maryland, Virginia, Rhode Island, North Carolina and Delaware — are also moving forward, with federally approved leases to develop offshore windfarms. One in 5 Americans lives in these eight states. The 600,000 jobs the Energy Department predicts that onshore and offshore wind energy will create by 2050 help explain their interest.Meanwhile, things are moving forward in other states as well. Hawaii plans to rely heavily on offshore wind as part of its goal of getting all its power from renewable sources by 2045. Like states on the West Coast, Hawaii has not gotten federal approval yet for any leases.An energy gapWhen you flip a switch, you expect the lights to turn on. Yet few Americans are aware of the delicate balance between supply and demand that makes it possible for the nation’s lights, appliances and factories to keep humming.Grid operators ensure different sources of generation, primarily coal, natural gas, nuclear, and renewable energy like wind, hydropower, and solar, meet demand. This mix varies by region, time of day and season, and the balance between these different electricity sources has changed significantly in the past two decades.The biggest transformations are the rising share of power derived from natural gas and wind and the decline in coal. As recently as 2000, coal produced more than half of the nation’s electricity, while natural gas contributed only 13%, and a combination of wind, solar, and geothermal energy powered less than 1% percent of the grid. By 2017, the share of coal-fired power had fallen to 30% and natural gas had jumped to 32%. The share of electricity from renewable sources aside from hydropower — primarily wind — had hit 8% and was growing rapidly.The share of nuclear power has remained steady at about 20% of the national grid, but that will change as many old nuclear reactors are decommissioned.In New England, for example, the Pilgrim nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts, will shut down in 2019. Four nuclear plants serving customers in Ohio and Pennsylvania are now scheduled to close as well.Meanwhile, the Brayton Point coal plant, the last in New England, also stopped operating in 2017. All told, utilities and state power authorities are retiring about 16% percent of the region’s generating capacity between 2013 and 2021, including coal-fired plant and nuclear reactor closures.With all the coal and nuclear closures across the country, experts anticipate that the U.S. will need approximately 3 terawatt hours of new capacity by 2050. This projection, which is based on historical trends at a time when the grid is being transformed, is a massive amount of electricity, equal to about three-fourths of all the power Americans consumed in 2017. Filling that gap may be daunting, but it also creates a chance to upgrade the nation’s power infrastructure while helping to tackle climate change.Lower offshore wind pricesEven with an impending burst of demand for new power sources, the offshore wind industry would not be nearly as promising if not for the plunging prices seen in Europe, where the industry has already taken off.In 2010, electricity generated through offshore wind off the European coastline cost around 17 cents per kilowatt hour, more than twice what utilities were paying for power derived from burning gas and coal. The price fell to around 13 cents by 2017. But when Germany and the Netherlands recently awarded some of the first unsubsidized offshore wind contracts, bids had fallen to as little as 6 cents.What’s driving this decline? A number of factors. Wind turbine blades keep getting longer, doubling in length since 2000. These blades are now nearly as long as football fields – about 270 feet – on 8-megawatt turbines. The extra length means they capture more power, generating more revenue from every turbine.In addition, offshore wind turbines have grown more reliable, and government subsidies and mandates have incubated and sped the development of Europe’s industry. While electricity from U.S. offshore wind farms will initially cost system operators more in the U.S. than in Europe — as is common with any breakthrough projects — we predict that prices will fall once the market gets bigger here.The Energy Department projects that there will be a total 86 gigawatts of U.S. installed offshore wind capacity by 2050, about 7% of the capacity of today’s grid and only 4% of the vast potential to harness this kind of energy. Given the speed with which prices are falling in Europe, we believe that offshore wind could ultimately play an even bigger role than that, especially should the federal government again make fighting climate change a top priority. Matthew Lackner is associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Erin Baker is professor of industrial engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.last_img read more

David Goffin Beats Denis Shapovalov to Advance to Japan Open Quarters

first_img atpDavid GoffinDenis Shapovalovjapan open First Published: October 3, 2019, 6:10 PM IST Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time. Tokyo: David Goffin of Belgium advanced to the Japan Open quarterfinals after squeezing by Canada’s Denis Shapovalov 7-6(5), 7-6(2) Thursday.Both men kept all of their service games — with Shapovalov nailing 10 aces against third-seed Goffin’s four — in the close match that lasted nearly two hours. Goffin, winner here in 2017, used his footwork to survive two break points while the big-serving Canadian kept up the pressure.Goffin will now face either sixth-seed Marin Cilic of Croatia or South Korea’s Chung Hyeon.”It was tough. We were both really solid on our service games,” Goffin said.Goffin goes on at the @rakutenopen 👊 🇧🇪 @David__Goffin defeats Shapovalov 7-6(5), 7-6(2) to reach the quarters in Tokyo 👏 pic.twitter.com/AAKXr350DM— ATP Tour (@atptour) October 3, 2019 “But he (Shapovalov) was serving so well. A lefty, serving everywhere. Great second serves as well. So it was tough to break him today. So I had to fight.”Match data, however, provided proof that Goffin kept an edge above his opponent, landing 70 percent of his first serves, against 52 percent by Shapovalov.In the rest of the tournament, Japanese wild card Taro Daniel defeated Australian rival Jordan Thompson 6-4, 7-6(3). He will next face Australian qualifier John Millman, who defeated South African Lloyd Harris 6-3, 6-2.World number one Novak Djokovic, returning from a shoulder injury, is scheduled to play French fifth-seed Lucas Pouille on Friday. last_img read more