Limerick house prices drop by 13 per cent

first_imgWhatsApp Facebook Advertisement Linkedin Previous articleShock at church robberyNext article40 jobs on way at Bunratty admin NewsLocal NewsLimerick house prices drop by 13 per centBy admin – January 4, 2013 554 center_img Email ASKING prices for Limerick properties plunged by a further 13 per cent in 2012, according to the latest report from property website myhome.ie. Figures from the myhome.ie report for the last quarter in 2012 show that the average asking price in the city now stands at €155,000, the lowest of the five cities in Ireland. Asking prices in Waterford stood at €160,000, Galway at €185,000, Cork at €195,000 and Dublin at €236,000. On a more positive note, the average asking price for a three-bedroom semi-detached home in Limerick fell by 35 per cent from peak prices, the lowest price drop in the country as most counties saw prices fall by between 45 and 55 per cent. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Geraldine Leddin of GL Auctioneers in Limerick city believes that the property market may see some light at the end of the tunnel in 2013.She told Limerick Post: “We found that the back end of 2012 was good in terms of sales, people were buying. Maybe this was partly due to the mortgage interest relief being abolished, but there was definitely a buoyancy there that will hopefully continue in 2013. I think sometimes daft.ie and myhome.ie can tend to portray the negative sides when there are some green shoots.”According to the daft.ie 2012 report, asking prices in both Limerick city and county are down by over 45 per cent from peak Celtic tiger prices, with the average asking price in the county currently at about €154,000.The Daft report also revealed that 32 per cent of properties in Munster sell within four months.Overall, myhome.ie revealed that asking prices across the country fell by an average of 14.8 per cent, however the number of transactions increased by over 15 per cent.The average asking price nationally was €201,000 in 2012, down 51.5 per cent from peak boom prices.Angela Keegan, managing director of myHome.ie, noted that the moderation in the pace of decline, the increase in the number of transactions during 2012 and the establishment of the Property Price Register were all positives which could be built on.She added: “The varying ‘sale agreed’ times show that a two tier market is emerging, with times equivalent to three months in Limerick, four months in Dublin and 5.5 months in Galway. However the corresponding ‘sale agreed’ times elsewhere are 10.5 months in Munster, nine months in Ulster and Connacht and seven months in Leinster excluding Dublin.”Daft.ie reported that on average, four in ten properties across the country sell within four months, while the total stock of properties on the market nationwide is at 47,000, the lowest level since November 2007. Print Twitterlast_img read more

DNA machine developed which could cure HIV

first_imgAn Oxford firm has developed two machines that can sequence the human genome in just hours.One of the machines, called the MinION, is the size of a USB drive and the firm hopes that it will change the face of DNA sequencing and make it “universally accessible” by vastly reducing the time it takes to sequence DNA. The other, known as the GridION, is the size of a DVD-player and can stack onto itself, linking the devices to increase computation speed. Current machines, which are mainframe-sized, take days to decode the genome. The technology has a large range of potential applications, and may assist in helping to treat diseases such as malaria and HIV by sequencing their rapidly mutating DNA. It could also help in preventing genetic defects through prenatal screening, as well as preventing genetic mutations in plants. The firm also expects the technology to find uses in agriculture. The technology has been developed under wraps over the past three years, in collusion with scientists at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California Santa Cruz, and was revealed at a press conference in Florida on Friday 17th. The CEO of Oxford Nanopore, Dr Gordon Sanghera, explained that ‘The exquisite science behind nanopore sensing has taken nearly two decades to reach this point; a truly disruptive single molecule analysis technique, designed alongside new electronics to be a universal sequencing system.  GridION and MinION are poised to deliver a completely new range of benefits to researchers and clinicians.’The firm has developed a new technique, known as ‘strand sequencing’, which is markedly different to that which came before, exonuclease sequencing. In strand sequencing  an entire string of DNA is threaded through a hole created in a cell membrane by an engineered protein, known as a nanopore, allowing the DNA to be continuously read. Previously, the sections of DNA were separated by an enzyme and dropped in fragments through the hole. Many students expressed excitement and admiration, with Sophie Avery, a third year physiologist at Balliol, saying “This device is especially exciting because of the speed at which it can resolve the genome. Clinically, there are a number of situations where time is of the essence – for example in prenatal testing where genetic defects need to be identified in time for termination of the pregnancy to be an option. The low cost is also very attractive – meaning more and more clinics could be using this kind of technology”. Raphael Chow, a second year biochemist, was equally positive, “I think that Oxford Nanopore’s novel DNA sequencing devices are absolutely mind-blowing. I was definitely very excited to find out that what scientists had been aiming to achieve – to make genome sequencing more ubiquitous by lowering the cost and sequencing time – culminated in such an awesome piece of technology. As a student, the brilliant academic and entrepreneurial minds behind the project will serve as a great source of inspiration for years to come”. Other students also expressed their delight and amazement, with David Ding, a biochemist at Univ, explaining “this helps a lot especially in research, but also allows for personalised medicine (ie. certain cancer therapies can be adjusted according to certain mutations, leading to much more effective chemotherapies)”.An Oxford firm has developed two machines that can sequence the human genome in just hours.One of the machines, called the MinION, is the size of a USB drive and the firm hopes that it will change the face of DNA sequencing and make it “universally accessible” by vastly reducing the time it takes to sequence DNA. The other, known as the GridION, is the size of a DVD-player and can stack onto itself, linking the devices to increase computation speed.Current machines, which are mainframe-sized, take days to decode the genome. The technology has a large range of potential applications, and may assist in helping to treat diseases such as malaria and HIV by sequencing their rapidly mutating DNA. It could also help in preventing genetic defects through prenatal screening, as well as preventing genetic mutations in plants.The firm also expects the technology to find uses in agriculture. The technology has been developed under wraps over the past three years, in collusion with scientists at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California Santa Cruz, and was revealed at a press conference in Florida on Friday 17th.The CEO of Oxford Nanopore, Dr Gordon Sanghera, explained that ‘The exquisite science behind nanopore sensing has taken nearly two decades to reach this point; a truly disruptive single molecule analysis technique, designed alongside new electronics to be a universal sequencing system. GridION and MinION are poised to deliver a completely new range of benefits to researchers and clinicians.’The firm has developed a new technique, known as ‘strand sequencing’, which is markedly different to that which came before, exonuclease sequencing. In strand sequencing  an entire string of DNA is threaded through a hole created in a cell membrane by an engineered protein, known as a nanopore, allowing the DNA to be continuously read. Previously, the sections of DNA were separated by an enzyme and dropped in fragments through the hole.Many students expressed excitement and admiration, with Sophie Avery, a third year physiologist at Balliol, saying “This device is especially exciting because of the speed at which it can resolve the genome. Clinically, there are a number of situations where time is of the essence – for example in prenatal testing where genetic defects need to be identified in time for termination of the pregnancy to be an option. The low cost is also very attractive – meaning more and more clinics could be using this kind of technology”. Raphael Chow, a second year biochemist, was equally positive, “I think that Oxford Nanopore’s novel DNA sequencing devices are absolutely mind-blowing. I was definitely very excited to find out that what scientists had been aiming to achieve – to make genome sequencing more ubiquitous by lowering the cost and sequencing time – culminated in such an awesome piece of technology. As a student, the brilliant academic and entrepreneurial minds behind the project will serve as a great source of inspiration for years to come”.Other students also expressed their delight and amazement, with David Ding, a biochemist at Univ, explaining “this helps a lot especially in research, but also allows for personalised medicine (ie. certain cancer therapies can be adjusted according to certain mutations, leading to much more effective chemotherapies)”.last_img read more

Syracuse field hockey falls 3 spots to No. 6 in coaches poll

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ UPDATED: Sept. 19, 2017 at 2:46 p.m.Syracuse (8-1, 1-1 Atlantic Coast) fell to No. 6 this week in the National Field Hockey Coaches Association Coaches Poll. The Orange ranked as high as third in the country during its seven-game shutout streak.That streak ended with a 2-1 home loss to Wake Forest last Saturday. SU still ranks first in the country in goals allowed (two). The next closest team is Cornell, with four.With losses last week from SU, Penn State and Duke, Connecticut remains the only undefeated team in the country and tops the coaches poll. All seven ACC teams rank inside the top 15 and five are in the Top 10.Syracuse did not receive a first-place vote, but No. 7 North Carolina did. Despite its 6-2 record, the Tar Heels received one vote. The teams play Saturday afternoon in Syracuse. In one matchup last year, North Carolina won, 3-2, in Chapel Hill.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe story has been updated for appropriate style. Comments Published on September 19, 2017 at 12:41 pm Contact Matt: [email protected]last_img read more

Churchill odds-on to achieve Classic double in the Curragh

first_imgRacing gets underway with the Fillies Maiden at ten-to-two and the going is good to firm. Photo: © pixabay.com Churchill is long odds-on to achieve a Classic double in the Tattersalls Irish 2,000 Guineas at the Curragh today.The Aidan O’Brien-trained colt took the British version of the Classic at Newmarket at the beginning of the month, on what was his first outing of the year.A field of five go to post for the supporting Group 2 Lanwades Stud Stakes at a quarter-to-five where Jim Bolger’s recent course Group 3 heroine Turret Rocks will be fancied to hold off Opal Tiara.last_img read more