Dooradoyle resident pens history novel

first_imgCelebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick Previous articleGearóid hoping to pull his weight in marathonNext articleDelta take off Guest Writerhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launch Twitter TAGSKieran GintyMusic Limericknovel #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Print WhatsApp Linkedin Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up NewsCommunityDooradoyle resident pens history novelBy Guest Writer – May 2, 2013 1076 Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Advertisement Kieran GintyA NOVEL dealing with one of the most dramatic periods in Irish history has been penned by a Dooradoyle resident.  Kieran Ginty wrote  ‘The Boys of Ballycroy’ – a story of how seven friends cope with the arrival of three conflicts – World War I, the Irish War of Independence and The Irish Civil War. Limerick is featured in the book citing some of the events that occurred in the city during the ‘Black and Tan’ period. Originally from Mayo, Kieran took up writing as a hobby. The father of two is works as a full-time public servant.  The 42-year-old first came to Limerick in 1989 to study public administration in UL. ‘The Boys of Ballycroy’ is now available in O’Mahonys book shop. Email New Music: 40Hurtzlast_img read more

DNA machine developed which could cure HIV

first_imgAn Oxford firm has developed two machines that can sequence the human genome in just hours.One of the machines, called the MinION, is the size of a USB drive and the firm hopes that it will change the face of DNA sequencing and make it “universally accessible” by vastly reducing the time it takes to sequence DNA. The other, known as the GridION, is the size of a DVD-player and can stack onto itself, linking the devices to increase computation speed. Current machines, which are mainframe-sized, take days to decode the genome. The technology has a large range of potential applications, and may assist in helping to treat diseases such as malaria and HIV by sequencing their rapidly mutating DNA. It could also help in preventing genetic defects through prenatal screening, as well as preventing genetic mutations in plants. The firm also expects the technology to find uses in agriculture. The technology has been developed under wraps over the past three years, in collusion with scientists at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California Santa Cruz, and was revealed at a press conference in Florida on Friday 17th. The CEO of Oxford Nanopore, Dr Gordon Sanghera, explained that ‘The exquisite science behind nanopore sensing has taken nearly two decades to reach this point; a truly disruptive single molecule analysis technique, designed alongside new electronics to be a universal sequencing system.  GridION and MinION are poised to deliver a completely new range of benefits to researchers and clinicians.’The firm has developed a new technique, known as ‘strand sequencing’, which is markedly different to that which came before, exonuclease sequencing. In strand sequencing  an entire string of DNA is threaded through a hole created in a cell membrane by an engineered protein, known as a nanopore, allowing the DNA to be continuously read. Previously, the sections of DNA were separated by an enzyme and dropped in fragments through the hole. Many students expressed excitement and admiration, with Sophie Avery, a third year physiologist at Balliol, saying “This device is especially exciting because of the speed at which it can resolve the genome. Clinically, there are a number of situations where time is of the essence – for example in prenatal testing where genetic defects need to be identified in time for termination of the pregnancy to be an option. The low cost is also very attractive – meaning more and more clinics could be using this kind of technology”. Raphael Chow, a second year biochemist, was equally positive, “I think that Oxford Nanopore’s novel DNA sequencing devices are absolutely mind-blowing. I was definitely very excited to find out that what scientists had been aiming to achieve – to make genome sequencing more ubiquitous by lowering the cost and sequencing time – culminated in such an awesome piece of technology. As a student, the brilliant academic and entrepreneurial minds behind the project will serve as a great source of inspiration for years to come”. Other students also expressed their delight and amazement, with David Ding, a biochemist at Univ, explaining “this helps a lot especially in research, but also allows for personalised medicine (ie. certain cancer therapies can be adjusted according to certain mutations, leading to much more effective chemotherapies)”.An Oxford firm has developed two machines that can sequence the human genome in just hours.One of the machines, called the MinION, is the size of a USB drive and the firm hopes that it will change the face of DNA sequencing and make it “universally accessible” by vastly reducing the time it takes to sequence DNA. The other, known as the GridION, is the size of a DVD-player and can stack onto itself, linking the devices to increase computation speed.Current machines, which are mainframe-sized, take days to decode the genome. The technology has a large range of potential applications, and may assist in helping to treat diseases such as malaria and HIV by sequencing their rapidly mutating DNA. It could also help in preventing genetic defects through prenatal screening, as well as preventing genetic mutations in plants.The firm also expects the technology to find uses in agriculture. The technology has been developed under wraps over the past three years, in collusion with scientists at Harvard, Oxford and the University of California Santa Cruz, and was revealed at a press conference in Florida on Friday 17th.The CEO of Oxford Nanopore, Dr Gordon Sanghera, explained that ‘The exquisite science behind nanopore sensing has taken nearly two decades to reach this point; a truly disruptive single molecule analysis technique, designed alongside new electronics to be a universal sequencing system. GridION and MinION are poised to deliver a completely new range of benefits to researchers and clinicians.’The firm has developed a new technique, known as ‘strand sequencing’, which is markedly different to that which came before, exonuclease sequencing. In strand sequencing  an entire string of DNA is threaded through a hole created in a cell membrane by an engineered protein, known as a nanopore, allowing the DNA to be continuously read. Previously, the sections of DNA were separated by an enzyme and dropped in fragments through the hole.Many students expressed excitement and admiration, with Sophie Avery, a third year physiologist at Balliol, saying “This device is especially exciting because of the speed at which it can resolve the genome. Clinically, there are a number of situations where time is of the essence – for example in prenatal testing where genetic defects need to be identified in time for termination of the pregnancy to be an option. The low cost is also very attractive – meaning more and more clinics could be using this kind of technology”. Raphael Chow, a second year biochemist, was equally positive, “I think that Oxford Nanopore’s novel DNA sequencing devices are absolutely mind-blowing. I was definitely very excited to find out that what scientists had been aiming to achieve – to make genome sequencing more ubiquitous by lowering the cost and sequencing time – culminated in such an awesome piece of technology. As a student, the brilliant academic and entrepreneurial minds behind the project will serve as a great source of inspiration for years to come”.Other students also expressed their delight and amazement, with David Ding, a biochemist at Univ, explaining “this helps a lot especially in research, but also allows for personalised medicine (ie. certain cancer therapies can be adjusted according to certain mutations, leading to much more effective chemotherapies)”.last_img read more

Charlie Wiggins Historic Marker Placed In Evansville

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Charlie Wiggins Historic Marker Placed In EvansvilleJUNE 23RD, 2018 TOWNSEND OUTLAW EVANSVILLE, INDIANAState Rep. Ryan Hatfield, the Indiana Racing Memorial Association, and the Evansville African-American Museum have announced that a race-themed historic marker honoring legendary mechanic and race driver Charlie Wiggins will be placed at The African American Museum in EvansvilleThe Wiggins marker will be unveiled during a ceremony starting at 10 a.m. Saturday in front of the African-American Museum.“Charlie Wiggins was the star of the African-American racing circuit in the 1920s and 1930s, capturing four ‘Gold and Glory’ races,” said Hatfield. “Wiggins was one of the foremost African-American drivers in an era when racing was still new, safety was minimal, and it took someone without fear to compete.”Ashley Jordan, Director of the Evansville African-American Museum, added, “Evansville is proud to honor one of our ‘Favorite Sons’ who brought fame to our city and state and to the world of early American auto racing. His dedication to a dangerous sport made him the most successful driver in the history of the ‘Gold and Glory’ race.”Wiggins is the latest subject to be honored by the Indiana Racing Memorial Association (IRMA), an organization founded by Brian Hasler and Mark Eutsler to memorialize the contributions made by drivers, mechanics, manufacturers, short tracks, and events that made Indiana the “Racing Capital of the World.”“With the addition of Charlie Wiggins, IRMA will have placed 36 markers across the State of Indiana,” Hasler said. “Our markers and the unveiling events that take place with them have helped educate the public about these contributions to building the sport of auto racing in Indiana, the country, and around the world.”Hatfield noted, “As a life-long race fan, I am pleased that Charlie Wiggins will receive the recognition he is due with the addition of this historic marker in Evansville.”“This marker will be a constant reminder of an Evansville resident whose determination and talent made a significant contribution to the sport he loved,” added Jordan.last_img read more

Housatonic River Dredging Program Wrapped Up

first_imgMaintenance dredging of the lower portion of the Housatonic River Federal Navigation Channel in Stratford and Milford, Connecticut, is now completed, The Connecticut Post (ctpost.com) reports.The $9.3 million contract was undertaken by Cashman Dredging and Marine Contracting Company, LLC of Quincy, Mass.During the last couple of months, the contractor removed over 270,000 cubic yards of clean fine-grain sand from the channel, placing it directly onto the Hammonasset Beach State Park in Madison.“We hope to maintain steady progress with similar projects going forward,” said Scott Bates, chairman of the Connecticut Port Authority. “The Connecticut Port Authority, in its first year of operation, has established a thoughtful system to identify and complete dredging and maintenance projects that enhance navigation and improve the use of Connecticut’s shoreline and inland waterways.”The dredging window in these areas, due to environmental constraints, is October 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018, although the lowest portion may be dredged until February 28, 2018 and the beach may be graded into March 2018.[mappress mapid=”24670″]last_img read more